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Settlement Interview Part 7
Jerusalem, Israel
By Andrew Beale
06 Dec 2012

Part 2 of interview with Burhan Kashour, a Palestinian, concerning the 3,000 new settlement buildings approved to be built in the West Bank.

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People With Special Needs Against Con...
Cairo, egypt
By Transterra Egypt
04 Dec 2012

Dozens of people with special needs against the articles of the constitution that tend their rights as citizens

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Egypt's Top Courts Suspend Work In Pr...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
28 Nov 2012

Egypt's Cassation and Appeal courts suspended their work nationwide on Wednesday, November 28, in protest against the constitutional declaration issued recently by President Mohamed Morsi. The decree, issued last Thursday, gave President Morsi powers to take any measures to protect the revolution, and stated that no court could overturn his decisions.

The decrees also protect the Constituent Assembly and Egypt's upper house of the parliament, known as the "Shura Council" from dissolution. The assembly and the council are mainly dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamists.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Cassation Judge:
‘‘Suspending all settings includes settings of cassation court of Cairo. Except sittings of remanded in custody, or lawsuits of killed demonstrators that already have scheduled sittings, until the constitutional declaration been canceled”

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Saleh El-derbashy, Lawyer:
"All lawyers are backing the fair judicial institution of Egypt. We are supporting the decision issued by general assemblies of cassation and appeals courts today, which suspending all their work until the constitutional declaration been cancelled".

Earlier on Saturday, Egypt's judge's Club announced suspension of work, condemning the recent decrees issued by Morsi that expand his powers. Morsi's backers say that the decree was needed to protect the gains of the revolution against a judiciary with deep ties to the ousted regime of Hosni Mubarak.

Egypt's Supreme Administrative Court (SAC) will look into twelve lawsuits filed against President Morsi's recent constitutional declaration on December 4.

Story: Egypt's Top Courts Suspend Work in Protest against Constitutional Declaration
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: November 23, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: November 23, 2012
Length: 0:01:23
Video Size: 86.6 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Wide shot of people gathering outside the Court of Appeal
  2. Close up shot of the logo of the Court of Appeal
  3. Various shots of people outside the court of Appeal
  4. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Cassation Judge:
  5. ‘‘Suspending all settings includes settings of cassation court of Cairo. Except sittings of remanded in custody, or lawsuits of killed demonstrators that already have scheduled sittings, until the constitutional declaration been canceled”
  6. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Saleh El-derbashy, Lawyer:
    "All lawyers are backing the fair judicial institution of Egypt. We are supporting the decision issued by general assemblies of cassation and appeals courts today, which suspending all their work until the constitutional declaration been cancelled".
  7. Various shots of people outside the Court of Appeal
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Somali journalists in Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya
By Ruud Elmendorp
23 Nov 2012

25-years old Amina Ismail is one of the students on the Somali Journalist School in Kenya’s capital Nairobi. Amina came to Nairobi many years ago with her parents when they fled neighboring Somalia for the civil conflict that started in 1991. As a refugee Amina was raised in Kenya and lives in the Somali neighborhood Eastleigh in Nairobi.
The area nicknamed Little Mogadishu is thriving with high rise offices and apartments, shops, restaurants, hotels, markets, music stores, artists, and a stark contrast with Somalia’s capital Mogadishu that remains destroyed after so many years of war. For journalists there it is very dangerous. This year only 16 journalists were killed. The Somali Exiled Journalists Association in Nairobi who organizes the journalist training commemorates these journalists with ceremonies in its office in Eastleigh. For Amina the violence against journalists is one of the topics she studies during her classes. She also goes out in Eastleigh to practice reporting, and it is very interesting because of its liveliness, economic activity, association with Somali pirates and even the extremists of Al Shabaab. Everything an aspiring journalist would hope for. Still Amina wants to return to Somalia as a journalist.

Soundbite 1: In the name of Allah, the most merciful and the most gracious, let peace be with you.

Soundbite 2: Later as a journalist, I want to interview any person in politics. Whether he is president, vice president or weather he is a parliamentarian. I want to interview them.

Soundbite 3: I know that one day, I will die anyway. So I am not afraid to be next to the ones who are killed. I have my ambitions, and if I die, it means it was my time.

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Thousands Protest Around Interior Min...
Cairo, Egypt
By CJSwansen
19 Nov 2012

Thousands of protestors including Cairo University students headed on Monday evening, November 19, to Mohamed Mahmoud Street near Tahrir Square and Interior Ministry headquarters to commemorate the victims of last year's clashes between protestors and security men at the same place.

The protestors raised signs and shouted statements against the Muslim Brotherhood and President Mohamed Morsi, demanding him to step down. They also showed symbolic coffins of revolution victims enshrouded in Egypt flags, and raised posters of them.

The protestors came close to the Interior Ministry building which made security think they were going to break into the complex, prompting police to cut electricity in the area, while protestors continued in the dark.

The protestors went on shouting the famous slogan of the anti-Mubarak uprising, but this time changing the name from Mubarak to Morsi, repeating “The people want the fall of regime!” and “Leave, Leave, Morsi!”

Stone throwing was reported between security and protestors, injuring 36 according to Egypt’s Health Ministry.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: November 19, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: November 19, 2012
Length: 0:02:01
Video Size: 99.5 MB
Language:
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Various shots of protestors raising banners and heading to Mohamed Mahmoud Street
  2. Medium shot, A large sign at the entrance of Mohamed Mahmoud Street reading “Muslim Brotherhood Not Allowed to Enter”
  3. Various shots of thousands of protestors at Mohamed Mahmoud Street
  4. Various shots of the graffiti portraits at Mohamed Mahmoud Street walls
  5. Various shots of symbolic coffins of martyrs covered with flag of Egypt, and a large black sign reading in white “Retaliation”
  6. Various shots of protestors shouting anti Muslim Brotherhood statements and shouting “Leave, Leave, Morsi!” and “The people want the fall of the regime”
  7. Various shots of protestors at dark Mohamed Mahmoud Street after Interior Ministry cut electricity at the area to disperse protestors
  8. Various shots of thousands of protestors in the dark
  9. Various shots of protestors putting fire on some wood sticks to get light
  10. Various shots of protestors raising a dozen of white banners with photos of victims
  11. Medium shot, a protestor showing a poster of last year’s army crackdown on protestors and a statement reading “Tantawi, we will not forget!”
  12. Various shots of protestors shouting “The people want the fall of the regime”
  13. Wide shot, an ambulance driving amid the protestors
  14. Various shots of the protest
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New Syrian Opposition Leader Holds Ta...
Cairo, Egypt
By CJSwansen
19 Nov 2012

The new leader of Syrian opposition coalition Moaz al-Khatib held talks on Monday, November 19, with Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr in Cairo, where they discussed the latest development of the Syrian crisis.

Al-Khatib told reporters that the newly formed coalition gained Syrian public recognition and support.

He also renewed his announced position of not visiting Russia and Iran for a solution.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: November 19, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: November 19, 2012
Length: 0:00:55
Video Size: 45.7 MB
Language:
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Pan left, Egyptian Foreign Ministry headquarters in Cairo
  2. Medium shot, a crowd reporters and cameramen
  3. Various shots of the meeting between Egypt’s FM Mohamed Kamel Amr and chief of newly formed Syrian opposition coalition Moaz al-Khatib
  4. Pan right/low angle, Egyptian Foreign Ministry headquarters in Cairo
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Roni Keidar in her living room
Erez, israel
By javiervidela
16 Nov 2012

Roni Keidar in her living room. While we were doing the interview, the sounds of bombing in Gaza made the house shakes every minute, and we heard the israeli alarm "Red Color" sound almost every 20 minutes. When we hear the alarm, we have 15 seconds to hide in the shelter.

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Women in Uttar Pradesh Have a New Har...
Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh (INDIA)
By newspoint
15 Nov 2012

Uttar Pradesh's Chief Minister, Akhilesh Yadav, is scheduled to institute a telephone helpline service in the state for women to report harassment including indecent phone calls, SMSes and MMSes. The service named “Women Power line” will be available by dialling 1090 from 15 November, and will be charged at normal call rates. It offers a security cover for working women and college girls, facing insecurity at public places from eve teasers. The power line will not be an emergency service, but will operate between 8 am and 2 am.

The identity of the caller to the power line will be a kept secret and the caller won’t be summoned to the police station or any government office or the office of the power line. The calls would be attended only by women police officers and the power line office will maintain contact with the aggrieved women till her grievance is redressed.

Women police constables who will run the service have been imparted training and also an orientation programme. The selected personnel have also been trained to answer calls in English. The uniform of the women constables posted in power line will be different from the police uniform. They will be dressed in a sky blue shirt, dark grey trouser and navy blue blazer with the centre's monogram. The power line service would be further expanded after the staff gets familiar with the hi-tech IVRS-based operations. The initial staff strength of the power line would be a total of 45 women constables, 25 male constables, and two women sub-inspectors.

Byte-Akhilesh Yadav , U.P Chef Minister
I want to congratulate police officers, who are involved in Women helpline system. After being launched, this number 1090 will help victims through the police. On this occasion (Bhaiya Dooj) we have given power line to the sisters of Uttar Pradesh. I think, the number 1090 will help those victims who are in trouble. The society is constantly changing due to mobile technology.

Byte-AC Sharma , Director General of Police (DGP)
"Alarming". What it shows, he asserts, is that the police are now in "proactive mode". "See, who attacks a docile police party? It is only because we are issuing challis, raiding criminals and setting things right that we are being attacked. The people doing the attacking will be dealt with strictly,"

Byte -Navneet Sekera, DIG, Lucknow range
“The women power line will not be a toll free service like the emergency police and fire brigade service. The service is at normal, applicable call rates. It is not an emergency service and will help restrict hoax calls made on the number’’, who is also the nodal officer of the project. “Only 10 per cent of the calls made to city police control room dial 100 service are genuine and worth taking cognizance,’’

Byte -Navneet Sekera, DIG, Lucknow range
“Earlier we had planned to run the service 24x7, now it has been decided to run it in three shifts of six hours each, the first shift will be from 8am to 2pm, the second from 2pm to 8pm and the third from 8pm to 2am’’.

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Egyptians Rally in Support of Gaza, P...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
15 Nov 2012

Hundreds of Egyptians marched on Thursday, November 15, from Omar Makram Mosque near Tahrir Square to the Arab League headquarters in Cairo to stage a demonstration against the recent Israeli attacks on Gaza Strip.

Protestors called on the Egyptian government to cut all diplomatic and economic ties with Israel, and to shut down the Israeli embassy in Cairo.

On Wednesday night, President Mohamed Morsi recalled Egypt’s ambassador to Israel following the Israeli attack on Gaza that killed at least 15 Palestinians, including Hamas leading figure Ahmed Al-Jaabari and two young children.

Protestors shouted statements against the attacks on Gaza, raising Egyptian, Palestinian flags and other flags bearing the words “There is no God but Allah, Mohamed is the messenger of Allah.”

They also chanted statements like “Gaza is Symbol of Dignity”, “O Arab Rulers, Open Door for Jihad”.

Protesters also demanded the opening of the Rafah border crossing to allow more Palestinians into Egypt, the provision of political and logistical support to Gaza, and the cancelation of Egypt’s peace treaty with Israel.

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood called on Egyptians to hold a million-man march in Cairo on Friday to denounce recent Israeli attacks on the Gaza Strip and to express solidarity with the Palestinian people in Gaza.

Hamas responded to the attacks by launching rockets into Israel, killing at least three Israelis.

STORY: Egyptians March to Arab League in Cairo against Israeli Attacks on Gaza
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: November 15, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: November 15, 2012
Length: 0:01:39
Video Size: 81.5 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot of protestors outside the Arab League headquarters in Cairo
2. Various shots of protestors raising large banners reading “Save Gaza” and raising Egyptian and Palestinian flags
3. Pan right shot of protestors outside the Arab league headquarters in Cairo
4. Various shots of protestors raising pictures showing injured Palestinians
5. Medium shot of one of the protestors raising the Egyptian flags with the words “ There is no God but Allah, Mohamed is the messenger of Allah”
6. Pan left shot of protestors outside the Arab League headquarters
7. Various shots of protestors
8. Various shots of protestors shouting statements announcing solidarity with Gaza and other statements like “Gaza is the symbol of dignity.
9. Medium shot of a banner reading “Gaza won’t die, the loss to Israel”
10. Various shots of protestors raising banners reading “Gaza won’t die”
11. Wide shot of protestors outside the Arab League headquarters

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"BE A MAN" CAMPAIGN - Editor's Picks ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
08 Nov 2012

Sexual Harassment is on the rise in Egypt and has been a growing issue since several young women were assaulted and stripped of their clothing by a mob in downtown Cairo in 2006.

According to a survey issued by the Egyptian Center for Women's Rights in 2008, 83% of Egyptian women and 98% of foreign women have experienced sexual harassment at least once.

Shirin Badr, a marketing manager at a design company, is working on a campaign called "Be a Man," which she started after documenting incidences of harassment on the metro with her mobile phone and posting them on the internet. The campaign works to educate the Egyptian public and support women's rights.

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Stop The Rise Of Sexual Harassment
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Egypt
06 Nov 2012

Sexual harassment has been dramatically on the rise in Egypt. It peaks during public holidays.

2006 marked the most horrific incident of harassment when several girls were brutally harassed and stripped of their clothes by a mob during Eid El-Fitr celebrations in downtown Cairo. The event played a major role in bringing the issue of harassment in Egypt to light.

According to a survey issued in 2008 by the Egyptian Centre for Women's Rights, 83 per cent of women in Egypt and 98 percent of foreign women have been exposed to sexual harassment at least once.

The complaints office at the National Council for Women has set up the hotline number 08-008-883-888 for receiving complaints about harassment during Eid al-Adha.

A group of Egyptian's pages on Facebook express a mission for monitoring sexual harassment in the Metro, by sharing women's experiences with sexual harassment through photos and videos.

*Interview Transcription:

My name is Shirin Badr, an Egyptian girl, and I work as the marketing manager at "Old Design" company. I also participated in "Yalla 3elm" website for long-distance education. Now I'm working on a campaign called "Be a Man."

"Be a Man" started when I was facing problems at the Metro station. I started taking the women's compartment, but of course there was no security so we had men in the compartment as well. So I started filming the compartment and broadcast the videos on Facebook and Twitter. The campaign was very effective. Once I got a call from a man telling me that I exposed his brother, and that he is afraid of going out and that he shaved his hair. The man was very supportive toward me and he told me that he is glad of what I did to his brother.

The next step was that I tried to get a man out of the compartment, but he refused so I started recording, using my cell phone camera. The result was that he hit me and the women in the compartment asked me to shut my mouth. I tried to stop the Metro and take him to the police, while women at the Metro helped him to run away.

From there, "Be a Man" started and more people wanted to participate in the campaign. As a team we started putting stickers in the women's compartments with the slogans, "Women's compartment, be aware of theft."
This was all in vain...the security officers were embarrassed so they started to check the Metro compartments for an hour or two in one or two stations, but what about the rest of the day? What about the other stations?

Besides the campaign we started to work on another issue, sexual harassment. We began to go down to the street and talk to people about sexual harassment and its causes, cooperating with other movements who also work on the same issue.

Recently we decided to sue both the Interior and the Transportation Minsters for the violations in the Metro. So we contacted some of the Metro employees who have papers that confirm the security breaches in the Metro, but they're absolutely afraid of talking about it because they tried to complain four times, and their complaints were neglected.

For everybody who wants to participate with us in this campaign, they can contact the lawyer Muhammad Othman Ahmad Othman, and he will work according to people complaints.

I am glad for what we've reached. Now I see a girl in the Metro asking men to get out of women's compartment, and some women said that they don't want to get in the women's compartment because of women recording men in the compartment. The negativity is infectious and the positivity as well. We need this infection.
Because the lack of security causes sexual harassment and theft, and this is not civilized at all.
When the Metro was invested in by a French company it was clean, well organized, and always on time. Now if you see a security man he will be smoking a cigarette in the compartment.

A friend of mine was in the Metro and there was a security officer and a man in the women's compartment. She tried to get the man out of the compartment, but the security officer hit her, dragged her, and kicked her. This is a disaster!

As for the sexual harassment, there are many reasons, but some people say that it's because of what girls wear. How about Saudi Arabia, the country with the third highest number of sexual harassment incidents, where women are all veiled and decent?
They blame the victim and give the criminal tens of excuses.
The last major incident was in Assiut with Sahar, the girl who got shot because she refused to be sexually harassed.
Our law is old, and a sexual predator forces girls to be armed. Two weeks ago a boy harassed a girl, and she took a knife out of her purse and cut him. This is a disaster. People should do something and girls should talk.
We should educate our sons that these girls are your sisters, and you have to protect them.

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Egyptians Address Morsi during Eid - ...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
27 Oct 2012

During the first Sacrifice Feast (Eid al-Adha) under the rule of President Mohamed Morsi, Egyptians send their president messages with various demands and issues that they wished would have been settled by the Eid.

The lack of security was the number one demand of Egyptians and the first wish they wanted Morsi to hear on this holy Muslim occasion.

Egyptians also address their new President to focus on the youth and work on providing them with housing and job opportunities, as unemployment in the country has exceeded 12%.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.”

A clean environment is also among the top demands of Egyptians.

President Morsi launched a two-day “Clean Homeland” campaign late July, during which workers, bulldozers, machines and officials could be seen everywhere nationwide. However, piles of garbage gradually returned to fill Egyptian streets.

Some Egyptians also demand retrial of those who killed peaceful protestors during the January 25 Revolution last year, complaining that most of the perpetrators have been acquitted.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.”

President Morsi promised that his first 100-day plan would put an end to five main problems in Egypt: lack of security, garbage in the streets, traffic jams and shortages of bread and fuel. However, monitoring activists say that Morsi achieved only 9.37% of the promises of his first 100 days.

In a previous speech, Morsi gave greater indication of the progress he made in the five major issues than what a lot of Egyptians actually feel.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 27, 2012 (and archive)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 27, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot of the main street in Tahrir Square
2. Long shot of some little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
3. Wide, pan right shot of streets around Tahrir Sq.
4. Long shot of some boys walking around in the square
5. Wide shot of the Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo
6. Medium shot of President Morsi during a press conference at the Presidential Palace (archive)
7. Close shot of a reporter taking notes during President Morsi’s speech (archive)
8. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
9. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” 10. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.” 11. Various, long shots of streets of Cairo
12. Wide shot of President Morsi heading to deliver a speech at the UN during the UN United Nations General Assembly meeting (archive)
13. Medium shot of President Morsi while giving the speech (archive)
14. Medium shot of the attendees during Morsi’s speech (archive)
15. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
16. Wide shot of Talaat Harb Square in downtown Cairo
17. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.” 18. Wide shot of a main street in down town Cairo
19. Long shot of little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
20. Various shots of the streets of Cairo
21. Medium shot of President Morsi during a speech to the nation, that was given in Cairo University (archive)
22. Long, pan right shot of President Morsi greeting the attendees of the meeting in Cairo University, after he finished his speech, and leaving the podium (archive)

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Clashes In Beni Walid
Beni Walid, Libya
By TTM
25 Oct 2012

The Libyan authorities announced on Wednesday that they had seized control of Beni Walid and that the city was almost liberated.
But yesterday, clashes were still going on in the city centre.
Thousands of people left the city in the last few days.

Footage from the road between Tarhouna (80 km north of Bani Walid) and Bani Walid, 2 km outside the town.

People interviewed are all inhabitants from Bani Walid trying to go back to their homes.

Translation:
- Man number 1  : " There are armed militias that belong to the brigade 28"

  • Man number 2 : " They have blocked our streets "

  • Reporter : " Who did? "

  • Man number 2 : " The brigade 28 " 

  • Reporter : " Brigade 28 of Beni Walid right? "

  • Man number 2 : " Yes, yes indeed "

  • Reporter : " And you, what were you doing? "

  • Man number 2 : " I was going home where I sleep... eat... "

  • Reporter : " When did you leave your house? "

  • Man number 2 : "Two days ago"

  • Reporter : " I see.. Two days. And what do you think? Is it possible for you to go back to your house? "

  • Man number 2 : " No, it is not easy to come back to Beni Walid. We were supposed to be allowed to get in by 10 o'clock by the name of the government and when it was 10 o'clock we weren't allowed. It was impossible for us to get back in Beni Walid."

  • Man number 3 : " We have been staying in the desert, and everyone is sick. As you can see, in our country we have the brigade 28 that is stealing our houses ." 

  • Man number 4 : " They have been shooting at us, we just want to know why they are making us leave our houses and our land. They are stealing our houses, our gold and cars. I came here today because I want to go back home, to my house but they are stolen and we are trying to protect our home and houses. Why is the media allowed to get in and not us?? They are not letting me in. "

  • Man number 5 : " Look at us! Where are we going to sleep and eat now? What are we going to do now? Where is the libyan people? Where is the government? Do you think I carry a gun now? I don't. But look at them, pointing weapons and guns at us. What are we supposed to do now? It has been a week today since we have been sleeping in the desert, where do we go now? "

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Concern for Za'atari Camp Refugees Gr...
Za'atari Refugee Camp, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
18 Oct 2012

October 25, 2012 - Za’atari - As Syrians continue to flee their borders, Jordan is hosting more of their neighbors from the north than any other country in the region.

 More than 210,000 Syrians have fled to Jordan since March of last year and according to the UHNCR there are 105,000 either registered or awaiting registration.

However funding requests have not kept pace with the demand for services in the Za'atari refugee camp which as of last week was hosting more than 37,000 Syrians. 

More than 50% of those in the camp are under the age of 18 according to the UNHCR. 

As Amy Hybels reports, concern for the welfare of the refugees continues as winter approaches.

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OCCUPY OAKLAND'S BIRTHDAY; TRANSGENDE...
Oakland, California - Beirut, Lebanon - Caracas, Venezuela - Seremban, Malaysia
By Editor's Picks
11 Oct 2012

Occupy Oakland celebrates its first birthday with cake, music and community.

Malaysian court rejects transgender people's appeal to allow cross-dressing, based on Sharia' law.

Chavez wins Venezuela election.

Hezbollah's Nasrallah claims responsibility for the Iranian-built drone that was shot down over Israel.

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To what extent will Egypt's new const...
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Egypt
10 Oct 2012

As Egypt's Constituent Assembly moves closer to completing the long-awaited constitutional draft, concerns are being raised regarding articles dealing with the status and rights of women. Some commentators predict a reduction in women's rights from those guaranteed in the 1971 constitution, whilst others suggest there will be little change.
Some women fear that even if their rights are protected by the new constitution, an Islamist-dominated state would find ways to violate women's rights them in practice.

Interview with Niveen Ebieed, Campaign Manager, New Woman Foundation
Niveen Ebieed explains the ongoing discussions between women's rights organizations and the Constituent Committee for the writing of the new constitution.

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Interview with Mohammad Mahjoub
Canada, Toronto
By Ali Mustafa
07 Oct 2012

An interview with Canadian security certificate detainee Mohammad Mahjoub. Interview conducted, recorded, and edited by Ali Mustafa.

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FEATURING INDIA; CONTEMPORARY EGYPTIA...
Asia
By Editor's Picks
05 Oct 2012

Kashmir Valley celebrates tourism week with the mesmerizing Shikara festival held at the world famous Lake Dal. Hundreds of boaters took part by giving tours on the lake where the tourism department gave live performances of traditional Kashmiri songs.

Based in the Chitrkoot district of Utter Pradesh, one of the most underdeveloped places in India, a creative small-town tribal woman named Meera launched a local paper "Khabar Laheriya" (Wave News) which began as a way for women to address sexual violence, gender issues and education.

Voodoo Doll: An interpretive dance piece performed at Contemporary Dance Night in Egypt.

Thousands of Jordanians gathered in front of Al Husseini Mosque in downtown Amman to call for electoral reform after Friday prayer on October 5, 2012.

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Rally In Support Of Hugo Chavez In Ca...
Caracas, Venezuela
By @LatAmSight
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of demonstrators marched this Saturday, September 22, 2012 in Caracas, Venezuela, to show their support for socialist president Hugo Chavez, two weeks ahead of a crucial election that could give him another six-year term, after having been in charge since 1999.
Scores of people traveled from distant places of the country to join the march in Caracas, wearing red to show their support of Chavez. Many of these people are benefit recipients of “Misiones,” a popular, government-sponsored social program to fight poverty using oil export revenue.
(interview 1 – Omar Rangel, optometrist: “What Chavez has done is to vindicate us, to include us in all the social programs. That’s what we have now. That’s why here; years and years will pass and we will still be here for Chavez”) In a particularly tight election, on October 7, Chávez will face opposition candidate, Henrique Capriles Radonski, who denies the alleged official government accusations to eliminate “Misiones” if Capriles is elected. (interview 1 – Telandria Castillo, teacher: “He is not friend of the ‘missions’. He has proven that he doesn’t mind the welfare of the mass but only that of one minority”) Chavez, who has remained in power since 1999 and has been treated recently in Cuba for cancer, is leading many polls with more than a 20% advantage over Capriles.

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Editor's Picks 13 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
12 Sep 2012

Demonstrations continue in front of the US Embassy in Cairo, with clashes breaking out between police and protesters including a constant volley of smoking tear gas canisters. Bahraini religious figures protest as well, though keeping their demonstration non-violent. About a hundred Tunisians protested on Wednesday, September 12, in front of the US Embassy, shouting anti-American slogans and burning American flags.

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Editor's Picks 12 September 2012
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
11 Sep 2012

Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in Cairo Tuesday, September 11, 2012, shouting anti-American and anti-Israeli slogans along with "there is no God but Allah," and scaling the US Embassy's walls to pull down the American flag. The protests come in response to an inflammatory trailer to a film called "The Innocence of Islam," posted on youtube, which reportedly depicts the prophet Mohammed as a homosexual pedophile. While people's anger in Egypt propelled them to protest at the US embassy in Cairo, in Libya, enraged mobs attacked the US consulate in Benghazi. The US Ambassador to Libya and three staff members were killed during the attack. In this exclusive video, interviews with local Egyptians and protesters illustrate their religious sentiment, for a full transcription click here.

8:15: "I am Sabir Shartout from Giza, and when I heard about the protest I was one of the first people to confirm my attendance-- it's the least one can do. It is a protest to express the people's anger. This situation is in need of investigation. To those who insulted the prophet: he is the greatest symbol of Islam and he is the root of existence for all Muslims, for all Muslims are alive to love their God and their Prophet. It is really hard and painful for our people and people like us to have to go through those situations. Do we, as people, really deserve this insult? As Muslim, do we really deserve this humiliation? Someone has insulted a symbol, a great symbol that gives meaning to my whole life, and that is the Prophet Mohamed (PBUH). Why are they doing this?"

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.

Massive Demonstration For Independence of Catalonia

Angelina Jolie Meets With PM Mikati & Visits Syrian Refugees In Lebanon

Kandil: Egypt's Budget Deficit Higher Than Anticipated

Discussing Syria:
Arab League Chief Meets With Britain's Hague
& Arab League Chief and Envoy Meet With Qatari PM

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Stateless (Part 2)
Geneva, Chicago, Kampala, New York
By DocuProf
01 Sep 2012

Refugees from Rwanda have been waiting for a change in their country since the Genocide of 1994.
Many more have arrived over the intervening years fleeing persecution and a progressively falling standard of living in the countryside.
The Rwandan government and the UNHCR have been pressuring governments in 12 countries to push the refugees back home.
In many instances, the Rwandan government uses spies and bribes are paid to disrupt and confuse the refugees, making it hard for them to organize.

Stateless gives the overview of the failure of the UNHCR and Rwanda to give a lasting and safe home for the refugees. It also points out failures of the UNHCR in the institution of it's own mandates regarding article 51 on refugees and the "Cessation Clause".
Because of a small group of refugees and dedicated Human Rights defenders, Rwanda and the UNHCR were thwarted in instituting the forced return of refugees in all but 3 of the 12 countries that have been pressured to accept the terms of the UN clause on refugees.
Featuring Paul Rusesabagina of Hotel Rwanda fame, Theogene Rudesingwa, former Rwandan Ambassador to the US (now in exile)
Much of the film was shot by the refugees themselves.

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Interview With Bahraini Activist Prof...
Budaiya, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
31 Aug 2012

31 August 2012
Interview with Professor Mohamed Alibovlash - former detainee and political activist.

Huge crowds gathered for a massive rally on Friday, August 31st, on the Budaiya Highway west of the capital of Manama, Bahrain. The demonstration occurs prior to the Human Rights Council in Geneva, which will take place in mid September, where human rights abuses committed by Bahraini security forces will be addressed. The protesters call for freedom and democracy, the election of a government that represents the will of the people, and immediate release of all prisoners of conscience, human rights activists, and children detained in Bahraini prisons.

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Interview With Bahraini Activist Mr. ...
Budaiya, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
31 Aug 2012

31 August 2012
Interview with Mr. Radhi al-Musawi - Deputy Secretary General of the Association of Democratic Action.

Huge crowds gathered for a massive rally on Friday, August 31st, on the Budaiya Highway west of the capital of Manama, Bahrain. The demonstration occurs prior to the Human Rights Council in Geneva, which will take place in mid September, where human rights abuses committed by Bahraini security forces will be addressed. The protesters call for freedom and democracy, the election of a government that represents the will of the people, and immediate release of all prisoners of conscience, human rights activists, and children detained in Bahraini prisons.

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Saliendo Adelante (Moving Forward)
Bogota, Colombia
By Ben Cheetham
26 Aug 2012

Walking through Bogotá it would be hard to ignore the overwhelming presence of those who call its streets home. Thousands of young people make up this sub-group of society, a legacy of decades of political instability. This Film takes place in one of 26 houses set up by ‘the Institution for the Protection of Childhood and Adolescence’ (IDIPRON) located in the centre of Bogotá.

‘Saliendo Adelante’ explores the life of José who, now in his early 20’s, has lived on the streets since the age of 6. José is now attempting to change his life’s trajectory by talking part in the programme of social rehabilitation offered by the institution. Through the film we are also introduced to the work of Orlando, a teacher at the institution, and his efforts to offer those like José other ways of visualizing the world around them.

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Protests in Egypt against President M...
Cairo, Egypt
By Daniel Crossman
24 Aug 2012

Thousands of protesters gathered on Friday, August 24, around the Presidential Palace area in Cairo, protesting against President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.
The protesters, who included former liberal Parliamentarian Mohamed Abou Hamed, call for an end to the regime of President Morsi, the first freely elected president since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohie al-Manialawi, retired general and one of the protesters:
“President Mohamed Morsi wants to put the Muslim Brotherhood in all positions. We are the only country in the Middle East, or the world, that has a party based on religion. There are Muslims, Copts and many factions in the country. The President must be a president for all.” SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mina Fathy, a Copt activist and one of the protesters:
“We demand that Morsi understands now that the Egyptian people don’t want him. We ask him to leave quietly, without suffering what Hosni Mubarak or other presidents suffered. We want him to leave the country to someone who loves it.” The protesters chanted statements against Morsi and the MB, accusing Morsi of being a traitor who wants to monopolize power in Egypt.

However, a lot of Egyptians are against the protests, believing that the President and his government must be given enough time to work and resolve the country’s issues.
SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Essam Abdel-Malek, a citizen against the protest:
“The U.S. President won elections with a very small number of votes, but they all recognized him as president for all Americans. We should learn this. Morsi made democratic decisions such as releasing journalists from temporary detention during trials. We should wait and give a chance to this government to work in order not to interrupt people’s work and interests, so that the country goes on towards development.” The protesters were shouting slogans like "down with the rule of the Brotherhood”, calling for a civil state not a Brotherhood state.
The protesters were mostly supporters of the military, liberals, Copts and activists calling for an end to the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood, claiming that Morsi only represents the MB not all Egyptians.
No violence was reported during the protests.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: August 24, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: August 24, 2012
Length: 0:03:10
Video Size: 156 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various shots of security men blocking the streets leading to the Presidential Palace with barbed wires
2- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
3- Various shots of former liberal Parliamentarian Mohamed Abou Hamed leading a rally of protestors
4- Various shots of a massive protest around a street leading to the Presidential palace
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohie al-Manialawi, retired general and one of the protestors:
“President Mohamed Morsi wants to put the Muslim Brotherhood in all positions. We are the only country in the Middle East, or the world, that has a party based on religion. There are Muslims, Copts and many factions in the country. The President must be a president of all.” 6- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mina Fathy, a Copt activist and one of the protestors:
“We demand that Morsi understands now that the Egyptian people don’t want him. We ask him to leave quietly, without suffering what Hosni Mubarak or other presidents suffered. We want him to leave the country to someone who loves it.” 7- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
8- Various shots of protestors spreading a huge flag of Egypt and shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
9- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Essam Abdel-Malek, a citizen who is against the protest:
“The U.S. President won elections with a very small number of votes, but they all recognized him as the president for all Americans. We should learn this. Morsi made democratic decisions such as releasing journalists from temporary detention during trials. We should wait and give a chance to this government to work in order not to interrupt people’s work and interests, so that the country goes on towards development.” 10- Various shots of security men blocking the streets leading to the Presidential Palace
11- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
12- Medium shot, a woman at a protest shouting “Down with the Muslim Brotherhood!”
13- Various shots of protestors close to the barbed wires around the Presidential Palace
14- Various shots of protestors raising signs against the Muslim Brotherhood
15- Various shots of protests outside the Presidential Palace

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Editor's Picks 16 Aug 2012
Beirut, Lebanon
By Editor's Picks
15 Aug 2012

Some family members of the 11 abducted Lebanese protested in Riad al Soloh square in Beirut, Lebanon on 9 August 2012.

The large Lebanese Maqdad family then kidnapped 26 Syrians, demanding the return of Hassan Al Maqdad.

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Stateless (Part 1)
Chicago, Kampala, New York, Brussels, Lusaka
By DocuProf
01 Aug 2012

Refugees from Rwanda have been waiting for a change in their country since the Genocide of 1994.
Many more have arrived over the intervening years fleeing persecution and a progressively falling standard of living in the countryside.
The Rwandan government and the UNHCR have been pressuring governments in 12 countries to push the refugees back home.
In many instances, the Rwandan government uses spies and bribes are paid to disrupt and confuse the refugees, making it hard for them to organize.

Stateless gives the overview of the failure of the UNHCR and Rwanda to give a lasting and safe home for the refugees. It also points out failures of the UNHCR in the institution of it's own mandates regarding article 51 on refugees and the "Cessation Clause".
Because of a small group of refugees and dedicated Human Rights defenders, Rwanda and the UNHCR were thwarted in instituting the forced return of refugees in all but 3 of the 12 countries that have been pressured to accept the terms of the UN clause on refugees.
Featuring Paul Rusesabagina (of Hotel Rwanda fame) and Theogene Rudesingwa, former Rwandan Ambassador to the United States (now in exile).
Much of the film was shot by the refugees themselves.

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Kabul's Reaction On Strategic Agreeme...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
03 May 2012

On May second, 2012, during the first anniversary of Osama Bin Laden's death, US President Barack Obama visited Afghanistan to sign a strategic contract between the United States and Afghanistan.

The broadly written agreement outlined US involvement in Afghanistan after 2014, and conveyed the goals and expectations that each nation holds.

After signing the strategic agreement, President Obama, in a speech at Bagram Airbase, stated that the war in Afghanistan has come to an end, raising many questions and concerns among the people of Kabul over the meaning of "end."

SOUNDBITES:
(00:17) - It’s obvious that the effect of this agreement on Afghanistan and its future is that at first it will cut the hands of neighboring countries out of Afghanistan.

(00:27) - And then the interference that the neighboring countries have had in Afghanistan’s affairs in the past thirty years of war will decrease.

(00:38) - That is what we expect as the outcome of this agreement. Hopefully it will be effective.

(00:44) – The presence of foreign forces in Afghanistan is never for the good of Afghanistan.

(00:50) - But signing such an agreement should happen with the awareness of Afghan people; National Assembly should make these kinds of agreements, not only the president and his advisers.

(01:08) - Every single person in this country is part of this decision, and so they should be aware of it. But it is still not clear what this agreement is.

(01:18) - All Afghans, especially civil citizens, need good security, so we really need the forces that have come to Afghanistan because they have come to bring security here.

(01:36) - Before these forces we didn’t have stability in Afghanistan.

(01:39) - So now that they have come here they should bring a permanent security to Afghanistan, because it is very important for Afghans and Afghanistan.

(01:56) - Even if we get into a war, the National Army, the Police, and the Border Police are powerful enough to take care of it.

(02:15) - Like when the attacks happen we see in television, and our national army fights against the insurgents.

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2012 TriBeCa Film Festival - Premiere...
The Metropolitan Opera, New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
26 Apr 2012

2012 TriBeCa Film Festival Premiere of Documentary Film 'Wagner's Dream': Red Carpet Interviews of Metropolitan Operatic Stars, Dramatic Soprano Deborah Voight (Brunnhilde) and Helden Tenor Jay Hunter Morris (Siegfried)

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Fears of Economic Depression Loom in ...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
24 Apr 2012

The international community is going to hand over full responsibility of the security and defense of Afghanistan to Afghan forces by 2014. It has been declared by the international community that the military pullout of the international forces will be accompanied with a reduction in aid money.

This happens at a time when 90 percent of GDP of Afghanistan is dependent on the foreign aid, and within the past ten years, solid measures to help Afghanistan become self sustainable financially have not been taken by the Afghan government and its international benefactors.

Many in Afghanistan believe that the reduction of aid without solid measures will lead to a financial crisis in Afghanistan, which will pave the ground for political instability and pervasive insecurity.

According to the World Bank's recent report TRANSITION IN AFGHANISTAN LOOKING BEYOND 2014, which came out in November 2011, the reduction in aid money will reduce civilian service delivery and will thus lead to economic depression.

The report says, "Aid for Afghanistan in 2010-11 was about $15.7 billion and World Bank's estimation suggests that a $0.5 billion decline in the external budget, which is going to happen, could affect 11,000-18,000 job opportunities in Afghanistan (on a six-month basis.)

Amar Rezayee, who is 23-year-old Afghan and an employee of one of the projects of USAID, which is the biggest donor in Afghanistan, says,

Translation sound bite #1, Amar Rezayee (USAID employee) (00:57- 1:52): "After 2014 the situation in Afghanistan will get worse because America says that they will take their troops out of Afghanistan, so it will effect security and will also have a bad affect on the economic situation in Afghanistan. Now there are a lot of salaries from USAID that are very high and can help me pay for my tuition at the American University of Afghanistan. But when Americans leave this country there will be high salaries for a limited number of people. Personally for me, it will have a very bad effect and I will not be able to attend this university because I won't be able to pay."

The World Bank report also states that In 2010/11, total public spending, including the “core budget” and “external budget,” was $17.1 billion.

Of this total spending, $15.7 billion was financed by international aid and only $1.9 billion of it was Afghanistan's budget.

Some people in Kabul are already scared of Afghanistan's future after 2014.

Vox Populi:

Translation Sound bite #2 Shafiq saighani (Kabul resident) (2:00-2:27) " If the US leaves Afghanistan, the financial support will be cut from Afghanistan, educational scholarships will be cut from Afghanistan, the unemployment will raise up and not only Taliban but also Iran and Pakistan will interfere in Afghanistan's affairs."

Analysts are also pessimistic about Afghanistan's future because of the foreseeable economic crisis after 2014.

Translation Sound bite #3, Candace Rondeaux (Crisis Group’s senior analyst in Kabul)(2:47-4:33) "The impact of the economical transition and the lack of planning will be tremendous. Politically it increases competition between Afghan elites. but more importantly what it does is it creates an environment of instability and insecurity and that I think will create incentives around the accedes of many, many Afghans for major capital flight, and also it will raise competition and rivalry between communities that could become very, very violent.

The impact of the internationals being present here has increased income tenfold for the average Afghan man. It has created opportunities for Afghan women, which weren't there before. Once all of that collapses, first there is the impact on the family life which is going to be tremendous. Where women once had the ability to go out and work and find some sort of independence, I think that will go away quickly, in fact I think that will be the first thing that will go away. For young men, who have been earning a thousand dollars a month or in some case five thousand dollars if they were working on an international organization, for them, they have been in a certain standard of living in the past ten years and have become completely dependent on this type of money. They have cars now, they have got houses to maintain and suddenly that goes away. Imagine the impact on the family; already there is a lot of intentions around money issues in every family, doesn't matter if its Afghan or American but when income starts to shrink that always has an impact."

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2012 TriBeCa Film Festival - Premiere...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
21 Apr 2012

Exclusive Interview with Alina Orlova and Sunsay, major Russian and CIS media stars featured in the documentary 'Russian Winter', premiered at the 2012 Tribeca Film Festival in New York

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2012 Tribeca Film Festival - Premiere...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
21 Apr 2012

Exclusive Russian-language interview of Alina Orlova and Sunsay, Russian Media Stars featured in the documentary 'Russian Winter', premiered at the 2012 TriBeCa Film Festival

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2012 TriBeCa Film Festival - Premiere...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
21 Apr 2012

Exclusive Interview with Peter Ringbom, Director of the Documentary 'Russian Winter' that premiered at the 2012 TriBeCa Film Festival in New York

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Tahrir Protests Against Military Rule...
Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
20 Apr 2012

Cairo, Egypt | April 20, 2012

STOYRLINE:
Tens of thousands of Egyptians marched through Cairo to the iconic Tahrir Square on Friday, April 20, in a protest referred to as the "Friday of Self-Determination.” The rally centered on the opposition of military rule, and the entrance of former regime figures into the presidential election race.

Earlier this week, the Muslim Brotherhood’s Khairat al-Shater and Salafist Hazem Salah Abu Ismail, major Islamist presidential candidates, were disqualified from the presidential race. Both men requested an appeal to the decision, however, the Supreme Presidential Election Commission (SPEC) revoked their request. The decision enraged many of their supporters, and sparked the rally in Tahrir today.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Protester in Tahrir:
“The decision to disqualify presidential candidates was political to begin with. It has many objectives, as the government and SCAF see that Islamists are the suitable mainstream for this stage, and that they were the ones who shouldered the revolution."

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Protester in Tahrir:
“We want freedom and we want termination of article 28 of the constitutional declaration. We reject the former regime figures, and we don’t want election fraud, because if it happens there will be another revolution and it will be bigger and we will not leave anyone.”

Although secularists view the Islamists negatively due to an alleged deal between the Muslim Brotherhood and the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Force (SCAF), Islamists and secularists reunited today in Tahrir in the massive march, voicing similar demands.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Rami Essam, singer and liberal activist:
“Today is special because many calls for protests that happened before failed. Today’s calls succeeded because the Muslim Brotherhood’s actions became clearer, and their alliance with SCAF was revealed.”

SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Muslim Brotherhood supporter:
“If there were mistakes made by Islamists, they could have happened by any faction. It is normal, but what is not normal is to argue and mistrust each other. We are united like one hand. The Egyptian people are one hand regardless of their political affiliation."

The protest seems to have unified both Islamists and secularists against SCAF, yet there were several soapboxes in the Square representing the popular political forces, including Islamists and revolutionary groups like the April 6 Youth Movement, and the National Association for Change.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 20, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: April 20, 2012
Length: 0:02:54
Video Size: 143 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS
SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot of massive numbers of protestors at Tahrir square
2. Various shots of protestors chanting and marching
3. Medium shot of a Muslim Brotherhood banner
4. Medium shot of banner against former regime figures
5. Various shots of protestors raising banners and flags
6. Medium shots of banners
7. Various shots of protestors doing different activities
8. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – One of the protesters in Tahrir:
“The decision to disqualify presidential candidates was political in the first place. It has many objectives, as the government and SCAF see that Islamists are the suitable mainstream for this stage and that they were the ones who shouldered the revolution." 9. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – One of the protesters in Tahrir:
“We want freedom and we want to termination of article 28 of the constitutional declaration. We reject the former regime figures, and we don’t want election fraud because if it happens there will another revolution, and it will be bigger and we will not leave anyone.” 10. Various shots of massive numbers of people at Tahrir Square
11. Medium shots of protestors chanting
12. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Rami Essam, singer and liberal activist:
“Today is special because many calls for protests that happened before failed. Today’s calls succeeded because the Muslim Brotherhood’s actions became clearer and their alliance with SCAF was revealed.” 13. SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – One of the Muslim Brotherhood supporters:
“If there were mistakes made by Islamists, they could have happened by any faction. It is normal, but what is not normal is to argue and mistrust each other. We are united like one hand. The Egyptian people are one hand regardless of their political affiliation." 14. Various medium shots of the protest
15. Various shots of protestors buying umbrellas in the form of Egypt flag
16. Wide pan left, Tahrir Square full of protestors

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2012 Soho International Film Festival...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
20 Apr 2012

Exclusive Interview with Danny Aiello, iconic personality of the American Cinema, recorded at the 2012 Soho International Film Festival on April 19, 2012.

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New Edict Threatens Progress for Afgh...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
19 Apr 2012

Storyline: One of the most significant achievements of the new era in Afghanistan, after the fall of the Taliban, is in new freedoms for Afghan women. They are allowed to work in public, go to school, and participate in the political sphere-- something they were not allowed to do under the Taliban. However, the Afghan Religious Council, composed of hard-line religious leaders, has recently issued a new edict that calls women second-class citizens and prohibits them from traveling without the escort of a Mahram [male family member]. The edict was endorsed by the president, and has the potential of becoming law. Many people believe the Afghan government aims to woo the Taliban into peace talks by crafting and endorsing such a controversial mandate. The law has faced widespread resentment by Afghan women activists and Afghanistan’s civil society, putting pressure on the religious council and Ulema to revoke their edict.

Yalda Samih is young girl, her family lives in Kandahar province but Yalda lives in Kabul because she studies at the American University of Afghanistan.
Soundbite-1 Translation: Yalda Samih Student living in dorm: "it's very difficult for a girl to refrain from traveling unless she has a male chaperon, because not everyone has many brothers, or a father to accompany her everywhere. if it happens (the edict becomes a law), then we will face a lot of difficulties."
According to women activists in Kabul this is an unrealistic and unenforceable law for the citizens of Afghanistan.

Arezo Omid is a young woman activist who works with Young Women for Change, an organization of young women activists who advocate for women's rights. She says the law is unrealistic, and cannot be imposed on women in Afghanistan.
Soundbite-2 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:00-1:17): "I was very disappointed about this edict of Ulema council, because we are not rich people to have a male company accompany us during our trips outside the country. it's very difficult for those people who don't have a Mahram."

Soundbite-3 Translation: Yalda Samih (1:17-1:32): "if this edict becomes a law, I have to leave university. because I don't have anyone to come with me and live in the dorm. my father is responsible for the rest of the family, and I have a younger brother, who is studying school in Kandahar. So I would have to leave university.

Enayatullah Baligh a member of Islamic Ulema Council rejects Yalda's claim about the edict.
Soundbite-4 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh Member of Islamic Ulema councils: "Find a husband. find yourself a Mahram (male chaperon), these are all childish words."

Sounbite-5 Translation: Yalda samih (1:42-1:55): "I think it is impossible, because around 1.5 million widows live in Afghanistan. this edict also questions women's freedom. those who want to study can't get married and study. it is impossible."

Sounbite-6 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:56-2:05): "I personally think the government wants to get Taliban closer. If the Taliban come back to power, we will do the same thing we did last time and leave the country for the Taliban and immigrate to other countries"

Soundbite-7 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:07-2:14): "When they say, 'we got closer to the Taliban because we are scared of the Taliban,' it's totally wrong. We are not scared of the Taliban, it is the issue of religion."

Sounbite-8 Translation: Arezo Omid (2:15-2:21): "the problem is that high ranking government officials support these edicts."

Sounbite-9 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:23-2:44): "This edict does not need to be passed, it's a matter of religion. It is higher than the Constitution of Afghanistan, because the Afghanistan constitution states that no law is above the Islamic law. They must not ignore our edict, if they do, the Ulema Council will take action".

Soundbite-10 Translation: Soraya Kabul resident: "As an Afghan girl, I do not accept this edict, because Afghan men and women had, and must have, equal rights. And women make half of the society."

Soundbite-11 Translation: Sana Kabul resident: "I do not accept this edict, because it states that every woman should be accompanied by a man, and I would like to say that President Karzai's wife is a doctor and Mr. president can't be with his wife everywhere. So I don't accept this edict and will not obey it."

Soundbite-12 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (3:43-4:23): Afghan women are Muslims, so they can never oppose this edict. If they oppose this edict that means they have rejected the religion. If a minister is traveling he takes a body guard with him, so why can't our sisters take someone like their brother, uncle or nephew with them? These women do not understand. It's for their good. If there are widows, the government is responsible to pay for their food, and the government is responsible to pay for the person to travel with her as well. It's all for the good of the women. I don't understand how it is NOT observing women's rights.

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Uprising Preview
Cairo, Egypt
By f.stanton
16 Apr 2012

In January 2011, millions of Egyptians took to the streets in a spontaneous eruption against thirty years of oppression under the regime of Hosni Mubarak. Communicating via Facebook and Twitter, the largely peaceful protesters braved tear gas, beatings, and live bullets in the hope of facing down security forces and overthrowing the government. Over eight hundred lost their lives, and several thousand were arrested and tortured by security forces.
“Uprising” tells the story of the Egyptian revolution from the perspective of those who participated, their struggle for freedom against tremendous odds, their sacrifice, and the courage and ingenuity that allowed them to succeed. Using footage of the revolution as well as interviews with key organizers and participants, “Uprising” provides a behind-the scenes view of one of the most dramatic events of our generation. Many of those profiled were arrested, some were tortured, several were shot. All of them describe it as the most meaningful and rewarding event of their lives. The film explores the frustrations that had built for decades, the role of social media in unleashing the revolution, the youth and courage that changed a nation, and the implications for the future. Their success in forcing the downfall of the regime, one of the most significant foreign policy developments since the fall of the Berlin Wall, has changed the face of the Middle East and provided hope for millions of oppressed people across the world. The Egyptian revolution was unique, in its use of technology, in its youth, and in its scale, and it happened at the heart of a region that is especially important and fragile. Above all, it is a story of profound hope, of courage rewarded, of a people who in a spontaneous, peaceful eruption beat back a police state and threw off the shackles of decades of degradation and oppression.

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Egyptians Have Different Reactions to...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
15 Apr 2012

Cairo, Egypt | April 15, 2012

Security has been tightened around Egypt's Supreme Presidential Election Commission (SPEC) on Sunday, April 15, after the commission's decision of disqualifying ten presidential candidates including former vice president and former intelligent chief Omar Suleiman, the Muslim Brotherhood's Khairat al-Shater, Salafi sheikh Hazem Salah Abu Ismail and the liberal candidate Ayman Nour who was Mubarak's opponent in 2005 elections.

Representatives and attorneys of some of the disqualified candidates appeared at the SPEC headquarters to appeal the decision within the scheduled 48 hours.

While Suleiman's presidential campaign and office manager refused to speak to reporters, the Muslim Brotherhood's attorney said that he was certain of the right legal situation of the group's candidate Khairat al-Shater, hoping that he would rejoin the presidential race after the appeal.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Colonel Hussein Sherif, Omar Suleiman's presidential campaign and office manager:
"I have nothing to say at all! No comment!"

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Abdel Moneim Abdel Maqsoud, Muslim Brotherhood attorney:
"We are completely convinced and 100% sure of the right legal situation of Eng. Khairat al-Shater. Hence, everything contrary to the constitutional principles and the judiciary settled basics I believe will vanish." Egyptians have different reactions to the disqualification decision according to their tendencies and desirable candidates.

Some believe the decision is a conspiracy to exclude Salafi sheikh Abu Ismail, others believe it was made to avoid fierce division over some candidates and some others see the decision is wrong and that it will deprive the presidential race of strong candidates with efficient programs.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian citizen:
"I see that this is a conspiracy against Sheikh Hazem Salah Abu Ismail. Everyone knows that it's a planned international conspiracy. God willing, we would live honorably under Sheikh Hazem Salah Abu Ismail."

SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian citizen:
"This is a right decision that will make the political street smoother and quieter. In addition, there will be no conflict among presidential candidates. That is better … because the country is going through a critical stage."

SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian citizen:
"Among the 10 candidates who were rejected there were some with good qualifications and provided good programs. Even if they had to disqualify them, it is necessary to point out the reasons for disqualification." The decision of disqualifying the ten candidates was made announced Saturday evening, and the commission gave two days for disqualified candidates to appeal.

Observers believe the exclusion decision is expected to add turmoil to Egypt's already chaotic political scene, bearing in mind that Suleiman, Al-Shater and Abu Ismail have a strong base of supporters.

Egypt's presidential elections are scheduled for May 23 and 24.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 15, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: April 15, 2012
Length: 0:02:41
Video Size: 133 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST: (Archive)
1- Medium shot, flag of Egypt on top of the headquarters of Supreme Presidential Election Comission (SPEC) in Cairo
2- Various external of the headquarters of Supreme Presidential Election Comission (SPEC) in Cairo
3- Various shots of Various shots of supporters of Salafi disqualified presidential candidate Hazem Salah Abu Ismail holding his posters
4- Various shots of security men and army men guarding the the headquarters of Supreme Presidential Election Comission (SPEC) in Cairo
5- Medium shot, Colonel Hussein Sherif, Omar Suleiman's presidential campaign and office manager, outside the SPEC headquarters
6- Wide shot, military policemen standing side by side outside the SPEC headquarters
7- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Colonel Hussein Sherif, Omar Suleiman's presidential campaign and office manager:
"I have nothing to say at all! No comment!" 8- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Abdel Moneim Abdel Maqsoud, Muslim Brotherhood attorney:
"We are completely convinced and 100% sure of the right legal situation of Eng. Khairat al-Shater. Hence, everything contrary to the constitutional principles and the judiciary settled basics I believe will vanish." 9- Wide over view of Cairo and the River Nile
10- Various shots of Egyptian streets and people
11- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian citizen:
"I see that this is a conspiracy against Sheikh Hazem Salah Abu Ismail. Everyone knows that it's a planned international conspiracy. God willing, we would live honorably under Sheikh Hazem Salah Abu Ismail." 12- SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian citizen:
"This is a right decision that will make the political street smoother and quieter. In addition, there will be no conflict among presidential candidates. That is better … because the country is going through a critical stage." 13- SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian citizen:
"Among the 10 candidates who were rejected there were some with good qualifications and provided good programs. Even if they had to disqualify them, it is necessary to point out the reasons for disqualification." 14- Various external of the headquarters of Supreme Presidential Election Comission (SPEC) in Cairo
15- Various shots of security men and army men guarding the the headquarters of Supreme Presidential Election Comission (SPEC) in Cairo
16- Various shots of Various shots of supporters of Salafi disqualified presidential candidate Hazem Salah Abu Ismail holding his posters
17- Various external of the SPEC headquarters and security cordon outside it

Frame 0004
2012 Soho International Film Festival...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
15 Apr 2012

Exclusive Interview with Michael Rymer, acclaimed Australian Director of the film, "Face to Face", recorded at the 2012 Soho International Film Festival New York Premiere on April 14, 2012