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Tunisians and Foreigners Rally Agains...
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
19 Mar 2015

Protests erupted outside the National Bardo Museum in Tunis where an attack left 23 people dead the day before. Citizens and visitors speak out against the attacks.

Tunisian authorities have taken nine suspects into custody amid an ongoing search for the perpetrators of the attack.

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Tunisia Museum Attackers Lay Dead
Rue de Bayrouth,Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
18 Mar 2015

***DISCLAIMER: HIGHLY GRAPHIC IMAGES, LOW QUALITY IMAGES***

March 18, 2015

Tunis, Tunisia

Two of the gunmen responsible for the attack on the Bardo museum lay dead after being shot down by Tunisian security forces during a raid on the museum.

The attack on the Bardo museum killed 20 people and wounded 44, most of them foreign tourists. Two gunmen responsible for the shooting have been identified Yassine Laabidi and Hatem Khachnaoui. It is believed that other gunmen are still at large. 

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Tunsia: French Hostage in Museum Attack
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
18 Mar 2015

Interview with a French woman taken hostage during the terrorist attack on the Bardo Museum in Tunis, Tunisia. Declining to give her family name, she identified only as José Marie.

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Hezbollah War Museum
Mleeta, Lebanon
By Cherine Yazbeck
14 Dec 2014

Where "Earth Speaks to Heaven": A Day at Hezbollah’s War Museum

Text by Cherine Yazbeck

A scenic hill in South Lebanon that Hezbollah fighters once used to launch attacks against Israeli troops is now a museum to commemorate martyrdom and victory.

This is the Mleeta war museum. Built in 2010, it stands as a reminder of Hezbollah’s main source of popular legitimacy – the liberation of southern Lebanon from Israeli occupation. Hezbollah fought against Israeli troops during their occupation between 1982 and 2000. In 2006, Hezbollah also fought a bloody war against Israel that lasted for 33 days.

The museum stretches over more than 65,000 square meters and includes an outdoor exhibition as well as a projection hall and indoor cafés.

On display are military equipment, fatigues and weapons of different calibers abandoned by Israeli troops as well as equipment used by Hezbollah fighters.

This project is still under development. Once completed, it will include a luxury hotel, a paintball arena and a cable car station that offers visitors a scenic view of the area.

While Hezbollah has been discreet about the project’s cost and source of funding, it is estimated that the museum has so far cost several million dollars.
The Lebanese Ministry of Tourism recognized the “Tourist Resistance Landmark”, as Hezbollah names the Mleeta museum it, as an official Lebanese tourist site.

The main gate has a college campus feel. At the entrance there is a café, a souvenir shop and snack bars. After climbing long stairs, the visitor reaches a circular observation area in the middle of which there is a memorial plaque honoring fallen fighters.

One is free to either walk around alone or join a complimentary guided tour in different languages. Guides are former militants who generously share their experience with curious visitors that flock to Mleeta from the Persian Gulf, Hezbollah’s Lebanese supporters, in addition to a few Westerners.

The guide suggests that Hezbollah is not a terrorist group and aims only at defending its country. In its war to defend Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime, the party has tried to distinguish itself from Sunni militias it is fighting, which it labels as “terrorist”. Hezbollah says the purpose of its involvement in the Syrian quagmire is only meant to deter extremist groups from threatening Lebanon.

A tour of “victory”

The tour starts with a short documentary film extoling the militia’s victories, accompanied by a soundtrack of explosions, military music and religious chants. The film features footage of Hezbollah’s battles against Israel and the group’s leader Hassan Nasrallah giving a speech, claiming that Israel “has fallen.”

The indoor exhibition hall showcases a variety of captured Israeli arms and equipment displayed in glass cases and galleries beneath ground level.

On the wall, a large panel with aerial photos maps out the destruction and casualties which Hezbollah claims were inflicted on the civilian population during the last Israeli incursion into Lebanese territories in 2006. Other giant panels offer a detailed anatomy of Israel's military machine and show satellite pictures and map coordinates of potential Hezbollah targets in the Jewish state.

Across the main square is the “Abyss” – a construction that symbolizes Israel’s defeat and withdrawal from Lebanese territory. It consists of a two 20-metre wide hollows that contain mangled Israeli tanks amidst giant Hebrew letters and scattered ammunition. Inside the round sunken arena lies a model of an Israeli Merkava tank with its gun barrel tied in a knot – this is a mockery of Israeli forces, portrayed as weak and defeated.

Scattered around the outdoor arena, Israeli military hardware and empty vehicles carcasses lie belly-up to underline the victory of the Party of God over “the Zionist enemy”. The labyrinth of walkways allows a 360-degree view of this dramatic “art” installation.

The combination of reality and artistic narrative continues as the path leads into the woods, where networks of waist-high trenches, camouflaged by small oak trees, lead to a tunnel; these are the rugged tracks that battle-hardened fighters used during the occupation to monitor enemy positions and hide from war planes and drones. The reconstitution seems unrealistic at times; however, the life-size models of resistance fighters planted in “daily-life” poses fuel some realism.

The details of the constructed setting are important as they display the nitty-gritty reality of a Hezbollah guerrilla fighter. Resistance against the enemy and martyrdom are the two major themes of this outdoor exhibition.

This former hideout was part of the militia’s trench-line. The pathway links up with the “Cave”, the “Outlook”, and the ‘Tunnels”, all of which formed part of the defensive complex used by the fighters. A field hospital and a camouflaged rocket launching site portrait the experience of “fierce mujahideen” who patiently endured all kind of hardships.

"The Cave" was once used secret as a secret bunker. Hezbollah fighters dug it over the span of several years and had to work in discretion, day and night.

A large part of the network lies underground, dug deep into the rocky hillside. Hezbollah built a legend around its tunnel digging skills. According to the tour guides, it took the fighters over three years to hack out the limestone. Under occupation, this underground complex housed hundreds of fighters and was equipped with a kitchen, a prayer room, a field hospital, a dormitory, a command room and living space for up to 30 fighters.

The passage takes visitors to a lookout point high above villages perched in rolling hills. The spectacular green and peaceful scenery contrasts the exhibition’s military ambiance.

For Hezbollah supporters, Mleeta is revered as a symbol of courage, commitment and sacrifice.
Unlike official war museums in Western countries, in Mleeta, the party has added a religious militancy as well as an emphasis on martyrdom. The exhibition’s cryptic slogan "Earth Speaks to Heaven" sounds like a philosophic statement that summarizes Hezbollah’s reliance on religion as a source of political legitimacy.

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Visualizing the Past at the Moesgaard...
Aarhus
By Nehal El-Sherif
11 Oct 2014

At the recently opened Moesgaard Museum, set in an idyllic Danish landscape outside Aarhus, Denmark, visitors are put face-to-face with the ancestors of the human race. The museum set out with some of the industry's most advanced technology to display artifacts and bones from archaeological digs around Denmark and around the world. The museum's directors hope to entertain their young and adult visitors by using narratives and settings with light, sound and animations.

“The ambition behind the new building and the new exhibitions is to tell stories for man about man, and to create culture-historical exhibitions which are experienced through the use of the senses rather than understood by the mind,” says curator and head of the new exhibitions at Moesgaard Museum, Pauline Asingh.

“Cultural history is often perceived as something for nerds or for people with a specific professional interest. We want to change that perception and give the audience an opportunity to encounter the people of the past as well as the present by telling stories in settings that speak to the senses and to the emotions.”

The museum's permanent collection includes objects and archeological remains from all over the world, and their public offering also features numerous objects on loan through UNESCO. Part of the current inaugural exhibition in the museum focuses on death and highlights contemporary and historical approaches to death in cultures around the world. A multi-sensory installation on Mexico's 'Santa Muerte,' and a video installation featuring people from different cultures speaking about death and the future are two prominent components of the current offering.

Run jointly by the faculties of Archeology and Anthropology at Aarhus University, the cutting-edge, 393 million Danish Kroner Moesgaard museum campus designed by the Danish firm Henning Larson Architects also features university facilities and houses Aarhus University's Visual Anthropology department.

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Witches Compass
New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
10 Oct 2014

Brooklyn, 10/14
The season of the witch is back. From American Horror Story: Coven to a new exhibit at the British Museum called “Witches and Wicked Bodies,” witches are once again ascendant. The current neo-pagan revival is less evocative of the cutest witches we met in 1990’s – it is distinctly feminist. The new witch culture blends a kind of radical eroticism with metaphysical liberation — and it aims to change the world.
On the weekend of October 10th, we attended and shot the first anniversary of the Witches Compass, a monthly gathering of appropriately attired occultists at Kateland, a bookstore in Bushwick, Brooklyn that is at the epicenter of the local pagan universe. Katelan Foisy (also a painter, model, and tarot card reader) lead attendees through an immersive ritual cleansing to honor the Hunter’s Moon — with massive paper moons on display. Katelan and her witch-colleague Damon Stang are pioneers of the occult revival happening in this hipster enclave. A few days after the Witches Compass, I sat down for an interview with Katelan and Fred Jennings, the co-owner of Kateland. They explained what makes the third contemporary resurgence of the occult so different than the ones that have come before. Intrinsically feminist, LGBT-friendly, and politically active by nature, the new witches are in it for far more than just love spells.

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Sanya: China's Hawaii
By Biel Calderon
25 Mar 2014

Sanya is the only tropical beach destination in China. It is located at South of the tropical island of Hainan, on the coast on the South China Sea. This tropical destination has become the favorite beach paradise for many Chinese looking to enjoy the sun, coconuts, good vibes and Hawaiian shirts.

As the country industrializes, tourism will become one of its primary and fastest growing economic sectors. The emergence of a newly wealthy middle class and an easing of restrictions on movement by the Chinese authorities are both fueling this travel boom. Therefore, nowadays China has become one of the world's top destinations. According to the WTO, in 2020, China is expected to become the world's most visited country by 2020.

In the past few years, the Chinese government has strongly promoted the Hainan Island as a world-class beach destination in an attempt to compete with other very popular touristic destinations like Indonesia and Thailand. In the year 2011, more than 30 million tourists, mostly from mainland China,
visited Hainan.

Unlike Europe, the United States, Central and South American, Australia and even Asian countries like Thailand, the beach culture in China is nearly undeveloped. Therefore, Hainan has developed a unique feel-good beach culture with an informal uniform of Hawaiian and duck floatation devices, a sight sure to make anyone smile.

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Khiam Detention Center
Khiam, Lebanon
By lukas.goga
08 Oct 2013

Khiam Detention Center was a prison camp during Lebanese civil war in 80´s and 90´s. After withdrawal of Israeli army from Southern Lebanon in May 2000 the camp was preserved in the condition it was abandoned. It became a museum of Lebanese resistance. During the 2006 summer conflict between Israel and Lebanon it was destroyed by Israeli Air Force.

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Khiam Detention Center
Khiam, Lebanon
By lukas.goga
08 Oct 2013

Poster of released Lebanese prisoners after withdrawal of Israel from Southern Lebanon

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THE FIGHT AGAINST MALARIA: DR ALBERT ...
Lambarene, Gabon
By serengeti1 serengeti1
10 May 2013

100 years ago te Albert Schweitzer Hospital was established on the banks of the Ogooue River, in Lambarene, Gabon. Today its Medical Research Unit leads the charge to discover an antidote against a scourge that kills hundreds of thousands of people - many of them children - in Africa each year. That scourge is called malaria, carried by Anopheles mosquitos.

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6th International Hornbill Conference...
Makati, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
24 Apr 2013

Different photographs and paintings of hornbills that are endemic to the Philippines are exhibited at the second floor of Ayala Museum in Makati.

6th International Hornbill Conference was held in the Philippines for the first time. The conference aims to bring together people studying or interested in hornbills to present and share studies, information and conservation techniques.
Delagates from Asia and Europe participated this conference on hornbill conservation which happens every four years.

It is discussed during the conference that Philippines is home to 16% of world's hornbills. Philippines has the most endemic hornbills in the world but ironically, Philippines has the most number of endangered species of hornbills.

According to Dr. Mundita Lim, Director of Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau in the Philippines, the Philippines spent 10 million pesos every year to rehabilitate and reforest a bald mountain but the government doesn't realize that hornbills play a vital role in propagating seeds and reforesting our forest....

After the conference, exhibit of photos and paintings of hornbills that are endemic to the Philippines are showcased.

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6th International Hornbill Conference...
Makati, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
24 Apr 2013

Different photographs and paintings of hornbills that are endemic to the Philippines are exhibited at the second floor of Ayala Museum in Makati.

6th International Hornbill Conference was held in the Philippines for the first time. The conference aims to bring together people studying or interested in hornbills to present and share studies, information and conservation techniques.
Delagates from Asia and Europe participated this conference on hornbill conservation which happens every four years.

It is discussed during the conference that Philippines is home to 16% of world's hornbills. Philippines has the most endemic hornbills in the world but ironically, Philippines has the most number of endangered species of hornbills.

According to Dr. Mundita Lim, Director of Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau in the Philippines, the Philippines spent 10 million pesos every year to rehabilitate and reforest a bald mountain but the government doesn't realize that hornbills play a vital role in propagating seeds and reforesting our forest....

After the conference, exhibit of photos and paintings of hornbills that are endemic to the Philippines are showcased.

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6th International Hornbill Conference...
Makati, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
24 Apr 2013

Different photographs and paintings of hornbills that are endemic to the Philippines are exhibited at the second floor of Ayala Museum in Makati.

6th International Hornbill Conference was held in the Philippines for the first time. The conference aims to bring together people studying or interested in hornbills to present and share studies, information and conservation techniques.
Delagates from Asia and Europe participated this conference on hornbill conservation which happens every four years.

It is discussed during the conference that Philippines is home to 16% of world's hornbills. Philippines has the most endemic hornbills in the world but ironically, Philippines has the most number of endangered species of hornbills.

According to Dr. Mundita Lim, Director of Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau in the Philippines, the Philippines spent 10 million pesos every year to rehabilitate and reforest a bald mountain but the government doesn't realize that hornbills play a vital role in propagating seeds and reforesting our forest....

After the conference, exhibit of photos and paintings of hornbills that are endemic to the Philippines are showcased.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

On the last strip of the Tuscan Region, overlooking Lazio, is Etruscan land. This is charming Maremma, standing out of Pitigliano cliff. An ancient village with perched houses, Pitiglian is also known as “little Jerusalem”. The resemblance with the Holy City is noticeable, as it can be seen observed arriving from the sea.

The narrow and steep alleys leading to the ancient Jewish quarter are another mark of the connection between Pitigliano and Jerusalem. In the 800s the ghetto of Pitigliano was inhabited by hundreds of Jews, and for this reason the village took the name of “Small Jerusalem”. Jewish migration towards Maremma started four centuries ago, and the Synagogue was built in 1598. It collapsed due to a landslide in the 60's, but was was re-built by the Municipality in 1995. Today the Synagogue, the Kasher butchery, the Milkvè bath, the bakery of the “Azzime” and the winery, are all part of a touristic itinerary. There is also a Museum managed by the "Small Jerusalem" association,“ that gives 20% of its revenue to the Municipality.

Every day tourists visit the Jewish complex to buy kosher products in the souvenir shops of the hamlet. The kosher wine is produced in the local wine factory, and is on sale in every shop of Pitigliano. The shops also sell kosher olive oil, azzimo bread and traditional Jewish “sfratto”cake.

The cake is made in the shape of a cane, and was prepared in the past to remember the 17th century tradition of knocking on doors intimating the edict of the Grand Duke Cosimo II, and announcing to Hebrew people that they were obliged to leave their homes and move to the ghetto of Pitigliano. It is now considered a Christmas cake. During the summer, “bollo” cakes of the Sephardic tradition are prepared, made with lemon and anise.

Pitigliano is the historic location of the cultural meeting between the Christian and Jewish populations. This kinship was sealed in 1799 when the population of Pitigliano embraced pitchforks and compelled the soldiers to flee instead of pillaging the ghetto. Years later during the Holocaust, Pitigliano again defended its Jewish dwellers.

Cava and Servi are common names of the Jewish families that were restrained in the Roccatederighi's camp, sent to Fossoli camp, and from there shipped to Auschwitz. Other Jewish families living in Pitigliano hid themselves in the countryside avoiding the endless Nazi roundups, thanks to the solidarity network of dwellers and farmers living nearby. In 2002, the Dainelli, Perugini, Bisogno, Simonelli and Sonno families were awarded with the honor of “right” amongst nations bestowed by the Institute Yad Vashem of Jerusalem.

“A human chain of solidarity preserved us. I remember the people who brought us foods. We lived in a cave me, my father, my mother, and mine of two sisters. To let us know that we were in peril we had a special sign agreed before. The farmer riding a black horse was the alarm sign”.

These are the words of Elena Servi, founder and chief executive officer of the Small Jerusalem association. She is 83 years old, and lived through Nazi occupation. She is cheerful, hearty, with a very clear memories of those youthful days when Fascists and Nazis constrained her to a bitter life.

Jewish inhabitants of the town have unique and extraordinary testimonials. Another is the story of Carlo Frischumann, a dentist in Pitigliano's during the war. A Jew from Eastern Europe, he arrived in Italy with his real identity concealed under the name of Carlo Schemmari. He never disclosed his real Jewish origin to the people of Pitigliano. He was killed by the American bombing on the 7th of June 1944 that hit the crowded old town and destroyed part of it. The tradition tells that he was killed in his medical study while he was curing a German soldier.

Another tradition tells that his assistant was wrongly brought his medicine bag to the office of Carlo Schemmari in Pitigliano and so the doctor was obliged to go to his office to recollect his bag. When the war was over, the population of Pitigliano was left astonished when the girlfriend of Carlo Frischumann, alias Carlo Schemmari asked to exhume the body of Carlo from the Christian cemetery and then she revealed this real identity.

Elena Servi is at the core of the Jewish community of Pitigliano, nowadays made up only by three people.

"My son Enrico is 50 years old and he is the latest Jewish people born in Pitigliano. There is no Rabbi in Pitigliano and the community goes to the Synagogue of Livorno, managed by the Rabbi Yair Didi. "

Elena was in Israel during the first Gulf war. She lived in the Holy Land from 1986 until 1995. She decided to live in a typical Israelis allocation. She lived in the kibbuts named to the memory of Sereni. In the kibbutz Elena was also in charge of managing the laundry service, amongst other duties. From that experience of life she affirms: “frankly if the kibbutz was not real, it should be surely invented”.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (1 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

Pitigliano, Italy. Pitigliano is known as "Little Jerusalem." During the 19th Century 10 per cent of the Pitigliano population was Jewish. Today there are only three remaining Jewish residents.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (19 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

The entrance to "Little Jerusalem", today a visitor center, in the past the Jewish Ghetto.
On the right wall explanations about the Hebrew calender and about Jewish Holidays.
Also on the right an entrance to the Mikveh(a bath used for ritual immersion in Judaism).
Pitigliano, Italy.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (18 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

The entrance to "Little Jerusalem",today visitor center, in the past the Jewish Ghetto.
On the left wall explanations about Jewish holidays and about the destruction of the Holy Temple.
In front is the entrance to the winery.
Pitigliano, Italy.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (17 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

The entrance to the wine cellar in the winery of the Jewish community of Pitigliano.
Today is part of "Little Jerusalem" visitor center, in the past the Jewish Ghetto.
On the sign on right it's written "winery" in Hebrew ("Yekev").
Pitigliano, Italy.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (16 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

The entrance to the old winery in "Little Jerusalem" , today a visitor center, in the past the Jewish Ghetto.
On the wall (on left) part of The Declaration of Independence of the state of Israel is posted.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (15 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

A small presentation of Passover (Seder) table - Seder plate containing different symbolic foods that represent ideas related to Passover and the Exodus , Haggadah, Kiddush cup.
This Passover collection is presented in the Jewish museum of Pitigliano, Italy.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (14 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

Pitigliano,Italy.
The Jewish museum.
Part of "Little Jerusalem", today a visitor center, in the past the Jewish Ghetto.
Among the small collection there are candlesticks, Kippah, Plates for Passover and more.

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The Jewish Community in Livorno Article
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
16 Apr 2013

Livorno is considered the most modern of all the towns of the Tuscany region. It has the biggest port of the region and it is the most populated coastal town. The emblem of the town is the monument of the four “mori” - pirates - a famous sculpture that represents dark-skinned pirates constricted by chains at
the feet of the Grand Duke Ferdinando I. The artwork has been realized during the time in which the town was enhanced itself as cosmopolitan town, through establishment of rules that allows the town to welcome with open arms Jewish people banished from Spain and Portugal. The story of Jewish people living in Livorno starts since that moment. Historical tradition of Livorno and Jewish culture are merged permanently until nowadays and Livorno is defined as the town of Judaism. It was held by Jew family the memorable bookshop and the publishing house named Belforte. Typical dishes the “roschette”,
caucciucco(fish stew) and the Livorno-style mullet are of the Sephardic tradition.

Like the typical words as “sciagattato” – ruined, and “gadollo” - fat or “gavinoso” – funny, which are picked up from the Bagitto and Hebrew dialect and still in use today . Jew was the Mayor of the prefascist town of Livorno, the Socialist Umberto Mondolfi. The list is including religious citizens like Rabbis Elia Benamozegh – was the Rabbi of Livorno for 50 years, Rabbi Sabato Morais and Alfredo Toaff, famous people like the philanthropist Moses Montefiore, sages and intellectuals like Attias, D'Ancona and Enriques, famous painters like Tivoli, Corcos and of course Amedeo Modigliani. These are only few
famous names of the entire Jewish community of Livorno. Livorno is housing of an old Sephardic Synagogue, considered one of the biggest and beautiful Synagogue around the world, it was built in 1591 but seriously damaged by the American bombing in 1945, then it became the goal of several raids during
the last time of second WW, and this led to a complete destruction of the Synagogue itself. The works for the new Synagogue committed to the architect Mr. Angelo di Castro started at the beginning of the sixties, a building of reinforced concrete inspired by the tabernacle (sanctuary tent) that accompanied the Jewish along the desert during the exodus- the new Synagogue has a modern style that it is not well accepted among the Jewish community of Livorno. Whatever, the young Rav Yair Didi religious leader of the community and well known and respected personality in the city is suggesting to not look the outside but the inside of the Synagogue. next to the synagogue is the center or the house of the Jewish community, there is the archive of the community,400 years of documents written in Portuguese, Italian or Hebrew. But the real oral memory is Gabriele Bedarida. He is keeping memories of what was the Jewish Livorno in the past. In the 1938, during the fascism period, before that the King enacted racial laws more than 1500 Jewish people lived in Livorno. More than 120 Jewish people of Livorno were wiped out in the Nazi concentration camps. Many of the people in the Jewish community of Livorno were rescued in the Nazi search, fleeing to the bush, hiding kids in convents, in religious colleges, or finding shelter by antiNazi friends. By the end of the WW II the Jewish community of Livorno had less than 1000 people.

Today there are around 600 Jewish people registered as Jewish community of Livorno, that leads, the community of Livorno to be considered one of the most important Jewish community in Italy after the one in Rome. But the Jewish community of Livorno is an old and aged community with no turnover. The last migration of Sephardic Jews in Livorno is dated to 1967 when due to the six days war many Jews abandoned Arab countries and part arrived in Livorno. Mainly people from the Bengasi community in Libya decided for moving to Livorno. Today the majority of the Jewish community of Livorno is made up by older people with only few young that rarely participate to the life of the community. There are around 70 Jewish people in Livorno that actively attend Jewish liturgies such as Shabbat and even more than 400 persons during Pesach or Yom Kippur. In the last three years 6 young Jews decided to leave Italy to
flee to Israel for aliyah. In the city center and in the market many shops are still run by Jew families: like the Disegni, Zarrugh, Doha, Modigliani, Bueno and Lombardo are some of the common names. On the other hand the Jewish school closed during the fascism has never been reopened and the same destiny
has occurred to the Jewish hospital and after a while to the old cemetery. There is no any Israeli restaurant in Livorno , the last running was closed four years ago. There is a bakery that works under Jewish rules producing bread without milk or animal fat/lard. There is also a kosher batcher that supplies
kosher meet to members of the Jewish community of Livorno. There is a Jewish museum, located in Villa Marini belonged to Marini family until 1867,was used as a synagogue until the new synagogue was open and on 1992 opened as a museum. the small collection is including a Hechal(temple) of the XVI
century,shofar,tallit on the wall are old marriage agreements.

There is an old cemetery closed and in a state of completely decay. The new cemetery is in use and located in the north of the city and it is near the general cemetery. In the new cemetery are the grave of Modeliani family and two memory boards one perpetuates the Jewish people that died during First World War and the other perpetuates the victims of the holocaust.

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The Jewish Community in Livorno
Livorno, Italy
By Mais Istanbuli
16 Apr 2013

The town of Livorno once welcomed with open arms Jews banished from Spain and Portugal. The historical traditions of Livorno and Jewish cultures are still merged to this day, evident by typical dishes such as the “roschette”, “caucciucco” (fish stew) and the Livorno-style mullet, all of which are of the Sephardi tradition.

Livorno is home to an old Sephardi Synagogue that was built in 1591 but seriously damaged by American bombing in 1945. The construction of a new Synagogue was initiated by architect Angelo di Castro at the beginning of the 1960s. The original building was comprised of reinforced concrete inspired by the tabernacle (sanctuary tent) that accompanied the Jewish peoples along the desert during the exodus. The new Synagogue has a modern style that it is not accepted by all the Jewish community of Livorno. Although externally modern, inside the synagogue and the center of the Jewish community adjacent to it is a dedication to the Jewish history of Italy. Both buildings host over 400 years worth of documents written in Portuguese, Italian or Hebrew.

Today there are around 600 Jewish people registered as residents in Livorno. During the Arab-Israeli war the Jews of Libya’s second largest city of Benghazi also headed to find sanctuary in the Italian province. There has also been an exodus of young Jews leaving Livorno for Israel.

To Read Full Article Go to: http://transterramedia.com/media/17635#
Article Written by : Enrico Catassi & Raffaele Palumbo

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The Jewish community in Livorno (1 of...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
16 Apr 2013

In Livorno, Italy, of the four Jewish cemeteries only this one is still active and has been since 1939.
In this cemetery there are plaques commemorating the Jewish who perished in WWI and the Holocaust.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (6 of...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
16 Apr 2013

The Jewish museum, Livorno,Italy.
Among the small collection there are candlesticks, tefillin, mezuzah.
In this photograph one can see (in the center) the hechal (a closet which contains the Torah scrolls) which date back to the 16 century. On both sides are displays of Jewish artifacts.
The museum is located in Villa Marini and has been open to the public since 1992.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (4 of...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

The Jewish museum in Livorno,Italy.
Among the small collection, there are Jewish artifacts which include candlesticks, tefillin, mezuzah, and the hechal(a closet which contains the Torah scrolls) and more.
The museum is located in Villa Marini and which has been open to the public since 1992.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (2 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

Saleh's Mont Blanc belt which he was wearing when he was blown up.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (3 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

The Patek Phillipe watch which Yemen's leader was wearing when he was blown up is on display. Yemen has the second highest rate of child malnutrition in the world, due to chronic poverty.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (5 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

Some of the gifts on display are slightly strange. These health food products from Sweden have inexplicably made the exhibition.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (6 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

A mosaic of the man people call "Al-Zaeem" or "The Leader"

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (7 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

Ali Abdullah Saleh pictured with Saddam Hussein, who is still very popular in Yemen.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (8 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

Ali Abdullah Saleh's trousers which he was blown up in in 2011 in an attempted assasination.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (9 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

A christmas card from Princess Anne to Ali Abdullah Saleh. Inexplicably displayed alongside memrobilia from "Spain, Portugal and Hungari” [sic]

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (10 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

Ali Abdullah sailing the Yemeni people through troubled waters. By an Unknown artist. Oil on Canvas.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (11 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

Not all the signage in the museum has been through a spell check.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (12 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

The museum takes up two large rooms, on the second floor of the immaculate Ali Abdullah Saleh mosque.

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Ali Abdullah Saleh museum (13 of 16)
Sana'a, Yemen
By Joe Sheffer
04 Mar 2013

Not all the signage in the museum has been through a spell check.