Frame 0004
The Amazonian Rain Forest: Farming an...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
20 Sep 2016

This collection highlights the deforestation of the Amazon due to cattle farming and corn farming. Various shots provide a look at the rain forest in its virgin state; workers felling trees to clear the land; a fire at night from slash and burn agriculture; a cattle ranch on cleared rain forest and a corn farm on cleared rain forest land. 

Frame 0004
Fire in the Amazonian Rain Forest (Sl...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain Forest using the slash and burn technique.

Frame 0004
Cattle Ranch in the Amazonian Rain Fo...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a cattle ranch in the Amazonian Rain Forest built on cleared Amazonian Rain Forest.

Frame 0004
Corn Farm in the Amazonian Rain Forest
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a corn farm featuring wide, sweeping vistas of corn and irrigation equipment in the Brazilian province of Minas Gerais. The corn farm was built on cleared rain forest land.

Frame 0004
Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain F...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of workers clearing and moving trees in the Amazonian Rain Forest using heavy equipment, bulldozers and front-loaders.

Thumb sm
COP21 Demonstrations in Paris
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
16 Dec 2015

Thousands of people gathered in Paris to participate in the Red Lines protest, near the Arc de Triomphe, and the D12 rally at the Champs de Mars. In a peaceful manner they demanded for Climate Justice and a fruitful agreement at COP 21.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 01
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Red Lines protest in paris. In the Background the Arch of Triumph.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 02
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Members of communities affected by climate change speak out against abuse of the governments and the oil companies destroying their ancestral lands.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 03
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Members of communities affected by climate change speak out against abuse of the governments and the oil companies destroying their ancestral lands.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 04
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Members of organizations conduct demonstrations in front of the media at the protest 'Red Lines'.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 05
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Members of organizations conduct demonstrations in front of the media at the protest 'Red Lines'.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 07
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Members of the Global Alliance for Incineration Alternatives (GAIA) pose for a photo at the Eiffel Tower.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 08
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Thousands of people form a S.O.S. Champs de Mars, Paris. In the background, Eiffel Tower.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 09
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Activist makes a protest, which simulates eat dollars.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 10
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

A person raises his hands after protest 'D12' in Champs de Mars, Paris.

Thumb sm
COP21 Protests 11
Paris, France
By Bruno Giambelluca
12 Dec 2015

Thousands of people form a S.O.S. Champs de Mars, Paris. In the background, Eiffel Tower.

Frame 0004
Global Climate March - Madrid, Spain ...
Madrid
By Daniel Stemler
29 Nov 2015

Thousands of protesters marched through the center of Madrid (Spain) during the Global Climate March on Sunday. The protest aimed to draw attention to climate change and force world leaders to implement serious actions against climate change on the '2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference' (COP21) in Paris.
In Spain, the protests were organized by Alliance for the Climate, a coalition of more than 400 organizations including Greenpeace. The coalition organized several climate change marches in different Spanish cities. Apart from Madrid, there were protests in Barcelona, Valencia, Bilbao, Zaragoza, Valladolid, A Coruña, Pamplona, Murcia etc.
Worldwild there were more than 2000 Climate Marches on 29 November.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 3
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
13 Apr 2015

Mohammad Razzaque Miah sleeps inside his temporary tent in Mymensing. He migrated from Kurigram to Mymensing after losing his house in a flood.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature: Bangladesh's Climate ...
Dhaka
By Anik Rahman
31 Mar 2015

Sept-Oct, 2014

Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a country of rivers and waterways on which large swaths of its population live. River bank erosion and flooding are common and continuous process due to global warming and rising sea levels. This continuous natural hazard is destroying homes and livelihoods and turning millions of Bangladeshis into homeless climate refugees.

The factors controlling river and stream formation are complex and interrelated. These factors include the amount and rate of water supply from rain and upstream activity, sediment deposited into the stream systems, catchment geology, and the type and extent of vegetation in the catchment. As these factors change over time, river systems respond by altering their shape and course. Unpredictable weather patterns also make flooding a common problem as the course of the rivers shift.

As a result of riverbank erosion and flooding, millions of people are losing their homes and fertile land every year. Most people who lose their homes or land become climate refugees, often pouring into the country’s overpopulated cities penniless and looking for new opportunities.  However, due to overpopulation, migrating climate refugees often arrive in the cities only to find themselves scrounging for food, work and accommodation. Thus, Bangladesh’s most vulnerable citizens are losing their battle against nature and are only made poorer and more desperate.  

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 1
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
19 Nov 2014

A homeless climate refugee sleeps in a park at Dhaka. The Bangladeshi capital is one of the most densely populated cities on earth. One of the major contributing factors to this swell in population is the mass migration of people from the impoverished countryside into the city. Many of those leaving the countryside fled after losing homes, crops, and livelihoods to natural catastrophes.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 6
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Rashid Miah cut down all of the trees around his house on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Having already lost his house to the river, Mr. Miah is salvaging his trees in order to sell them and save enough money to move to Dhaka.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 8
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rubel stands in front of his uprooted coconut trees on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. After loosing his cow to river bank erosion, these coconut trees were his last source of livelihood. However, these trees have now also fallen victim to the river.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 12
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rabeya Khatun mourns her lost husband and son on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Her husband and son lost their lives when their house was swallowed by the river as they slept. Rabeya was at her mother's house when the incident occurred and thus survived.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Ikram stands in front of the Meghna river, near Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. He has seen his neighbors migrating and even dying because of water related disasters. Despite strong signals that it is best to leave the area, he does not know what to do because his land is all he has.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 2
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
03 Oct 2014

Sadarghat Launch Terminal, situated on the bank of the river Buriganga in Dhaka, is one of the busiest places in Bangladesh. Most people migrating from the countryside pass through this port to migrate to Dhaka. Many of those migrating are climate refugees.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 4
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Shahjahan transports tin sheets and other materials from his house. Some families actually migrate before disaster strikes so they do not lose all of their belongings in an impending disaster. Mohammad deconstructed his entire house and moved it elsewhere before it was destroyed by the water.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 5
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Mamun stands over his submerged house in the Padma River in Dohar, Dhaka. Mr. Mamun's house was swallowed by the Padma after river bank erosion resulted in a land implosion.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 7
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Romjal Ali takes a selfie with his destroyed house. Mr. Ali's house was destroyed by the eroding river bank. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 9
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Rabeya Begum stands over the roof of her house which she salvaged after it was destroyed by river bank erosion. She is going to use the salvaged materials to build her new home. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Khadija Akhter was only able to save this cabinet and some bricks from her house after river bank erosion resulted in her house being destroyed and submerged. Dohar, Dhaka.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Hashmot Ali's house sits tilted and half submerged in the Padma river after the bank on which his house was built gave way. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Thumb sm
Shadows on Silk - 02
Surin, Thailand
By Gloria Kurnik
30 Apr 2013

Isaan, Thailand. Houses around Surin in Thailand were once a hub of cottage silk production. A housewife was taking care of each step, from rearing worms to weaving.

Thumb sm
Shadows on Silk - 03
Surin, Thailand
By Gloria Kurnik
30 Apr 2013

Isaan, Thailand. Pimnipa chats with her aunt about global warming. This is a really “hot” topic in the village nowadays. Both women once used to rear silkworms.

Thumb sm
Shadows on Silk - 04
Surin, Thailand
By Gloria Kurnik
30 Apr 2013

Isaan, Thailand. A woman shows off her sericulture. Traditionally, the threshing floor is wetted to keep the temperature down. Modern appliances like AC had been installed to fight the rising temperatures.

Thumb sm
Shadows on Silk - 06
Surin, Thailand
By Gloria Kurnik
30 Apr 2013

Isaan, Thailand. As silkworms feed only on the fresh leaves, some are growing them as a side business. With caterpillars eating 3 times a day, this bag won’t last for long.

Thumb sm
Esplin120711_2385.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
11 Jul 2012

The rate of ocean acidification is expected to accelerate in the near future. Since the industrial revolution, ocean acidification has increased by 30%. Scientists believe that this rate is faster than anything previously experienced over the last 55 million years.

The problem is that even a mild change in PH levels has significant impact on animals with calcium carbonate shells or skeletons. They literally dissolve. Affected animals include krill and plankton as well as coral. This means that the bottom of the food web could potentially become extinct, and in turn so could fish, according to Zoologist Kent Carpenter: "If corals themselves are at risk of extinction and do in fact go extinct, that will most probably lead to a cascade effect where we will lose thousands and thousands of other species that depend on coral reefs.”

Thumb sm
Esplin120710_2336.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
10 Jul 2012

A fisherman wades through the shallows carrying a handful of possessions after a mornings fishing trip.

Attempts to educate fishermen have been made by the environmental community, and attitudes are slowly changing. The Coral Triangle Initiative announced that it saw a decrease in the use of destructive fishing methods in 2012. Although, they stated that other threats such as Population increase, pollution and sedimentation have increased considerably.

Thumb sm
Esplin120710_2384.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
10 Jul 2012

A fisherman on Palawan Island in the Philippines prepares for a fishing voyage out to sea.

Scientists have predicted that by 2100, global temperature rise could result in the extinction of coral in the Coral Triangle. This would lead to an 80% reduction in regional food production.