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Mugabe Portrait 3
Harare
By Davina Jogi
01 Dec 2017

December 2, 2017
In a small act of defiance, the offical portrait of President Robert Mugabe hangs behind a flag where it cannot be seen, at a business in Marlborough, Harare. 

Business owners in Zimbabwe have long been required to hang an official portrait of the former President in their shops and offices. Originally these were supplied by the Ministry of Information, but in 2011 Newsday reported that businesses in downtown Harare were being forced by ZANU-PF youth militia to buy portraits for $US60, or face eviction.

A symbol of Mugabe’s rule, many of the portraits were taken down in the wake of the political events that led to his resignation in November. However, some storeowners were still too nervous to remove them and preferred to wait until they were told to do so. In other places, the portrait was not removed because it had been there so long it had been forgotten.

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Mugabe Portrait 2
Harare
By Davina Jogi
01 Dec 2017

December 2, 2017
The official portrait of President Robert Mugabe hangs in the storeroom at the back of a stationery store in downtown Harare two weeks after Mugabe resigned. 

Business owners in Zimbabwe have long been required to hang an official portrait of the former President in their shops and offices. Originally these were supplied by the Ministry of Information, but in 2011 Newsday reported that businesses in downtown Harare were being forced by ZANU-PF youth militia to buy portraits for USD 60.00, or face eviction.

A symbol of Mugabe’s rule, many of the portraits were taken down in the wake of the political events that led to his resignation in November. However, some storeowners were still too nervous to remove them and preferred to wait until they were told to do so. In other places, the portrait was not removed because it had been there so long it had been forgotten.

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Mugabe Portrait 1
Harare
By Davina Jogi
01 Dec 2017

The official portrait of President Robert Mugabe is placed among car parts at an auto spares kiosk in downtown Harare two weeks after Mugabe resigned.

Business owners in Zimbabwe have long been required to hang an official portrait of the former President in their shops and offices. Originally these were supplied by the Ministry of Information, but in 2011 Newsday reported that businesses in downtown Harare were being forced by ZANU-PF youth militia to buy portraits for USD 60.00, or face eviction.

A symbol of Mugabe’s rule, many of the portraits were taken down in the wake of the political events that led to his resignation in November. However, some storeowners were still too nervous to remove them and preferred to wait until they were told to do so. In other places, the portrait was not removed because it had been there so long it had been forgotten.

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DJogi_Portraits-4
Harare
By Davina Jogi
01 Dec 2017

The spot where President Robert Mugabe's portrait used to hang at the back of a pharmacy in Greencroft, Harare. The shop assistant was too nervous to have the portrait photographed where it had been stashed behind a filing cabinet so he put it back on the wall to show where it had been.

Business owners in Zimbabwe have long been required to hang an offical portrait of the former President in their shops and offices. Originally these were supplied by the Ministry of Information but in 2011 businesses in downtown Harare reported that ZANU-PF youth militia were forcing them to buy portraits for $US60 or face eviction. A symbol of despotic rule, many of the portraits were taken down in the wake of the political events that led to Mugabe's resignation in November. However, some store owners were still too frightened to remove them and others simply did not think to do so because the portrait had been there so long it was not even noticed anymore.

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Mugabe Portrait 4
Harare
By Davina Jogi
30 Nov 2017

December 1, 2017
The official portrait of President Robert Mugabe hangs in the office at a factory in Willowvale, Harare two weeks after Mugabe resigned.

Business owners in Zimbabwe have long been required to hang an official portrait of the former President in their shops and offices. Originally these were supplied by the Ministry of Information, but in 2011 Newsday reported that businesses in downtown Harare were being forced by ZANU-PF youth militia to buy portraits for $US60, or face eviction.

A symbol of Mugabe’s rule, many of the portraits were taken down in the wake of the political events that led to his resignation in November. However, some storeowners were still too nervous to remove them and preferred to wait until they were told to do so. In other places, the portrait was not removed because it had been there so long it had been forgotten.

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Mugabe Portrait 5
Harare
By Davina Jogi
26 Nov 2017

November 27, 2017
The official portrait of President Robert Mugabe is seen behind the reception desk at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Harare on the day it was taken down.

Business owners in Zimbabwe have long been required to hang an official portrait of the former President in their shops and offices. Originally these were supplied by the Ministry of Information, but in 2011 Newsday reported that businesses in downtown Harare were being forced by ZANU-PF youth militia to buy portraits for $US60, or face eviction.

A symbol of Mugabe’s rule, many of the portraits were taken down in the wake of the political events that led to his resignation in November. However, some storeowners were still too nervous to remove them and preferred to wait until they were told to do so. In other places, the portrait was not removed because it had been there so long it had been forgotten.

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Minimal Histories | Patagonia
El Calafate
By Gabriele Orlini
07 Sep 2017

Patagonia is the right place to walk, lose oneself in our own certainties and feel the right to doubt. Minimal Histories is the stage of a journey, a meeting with the Men who breathe the land at the end of the earth. They're stories told with a Mate in our hands, to share the sacred drink of the Argentine hospitality during the long evenings of the Patagonian pampas. Simple men, sometimes anachronistic, but absolutely of today. As a narrative, Minimal Histories tells the story of everyone and each of these stories is the story of all of us. One of our fears that are raised within us and covered with a dark night sky of endless stars. One of our dreams and thoughts about the future that every sunrise lights to hole up behind a new moon.

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TALPAPRIL2017-11
London
By Tom Price
05 Apr 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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AZG0003021
Grosbois, Boissy Saint-lã©ger
By Zahara Gómez
04 Apr 2017

Une jeune fille prépare son trotteur avant de le monter

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Käsmu, Estonia, 2016
Käsmu
By Laura Chiaroni
26 Oct 2016

A representative of the Ukrainian minority visiting the town of Käsmu.

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CornersmithCafe-hr-3868
Sydney
By katherinegriffiths
11 Oct 2016

Cornersmith Cafe, 88 View Street Annandale, Sydney - 12th October 2016. Owner and co-founder of Cornersmith Cafe Alex Elliott-Howery will speak at the next City of Sydney Business 101 Seminar: New Business Concepts. (Model release: ER20161011-Business 101 -00431.jpg)

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EmilyaColliver-hr-3725
Sydney
By katherinegriffiths
11 Oct 2016

Surry Hills, Sydney - 12th October 2016. Founder & Director of Art Pharmacy Emilya Colliver will speak at the next City of Sydney Business 101 Seminar: New Business Concepts. (Model release: ER20161011-Business 101 -00431.jpg)

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EmilyaColliver-hr-3824
Sydney
By katherinegriffiths
11 Oct 2016

Surry Hills, Sydney - 12th October 2016. Founder & Director of Art Pharmacy Emilya Colliver will speak at the next City of Sydney Business 101 Seminar: New Business Concepts. (Model release: ER20161011-Business 101 -00431.jpg)

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Found objects
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Everyday items found in situ belonging to the Soviet period. They show how deep was the process of Russification, started from the 50s, especially within the people's daily lives.

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Narva, Estonia, 2016
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

O ne of the very few statues of Lenin left within the E uropean Union stands today in the courtyard of the Narva castle. The Russian communist revolutionary directs his look to the border, just a few meters away.

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Narva, Estonia, 2016
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Sergej Tjahin came to Narva looking for a job in 1969 from Chuvashia, a region in the center of European Russia.

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Sillamae, Estonia, 2016
sillamae
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Inside the Sillamäe Cultural Centre is hidden a fallout shelter, where today all sorts of items from the Soviet period are kept, together with souvenirs and memorabilia, like this book collecting champions and sport heros of the city.

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Found objects
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Everyday items found in situ belonging to the Soviet period. They show how deep was the process of Russification, started from the 50s, especially within the people's daily lives.

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Narva, Estonia, 2016
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Jelena Shestak is a teacher of Estonian language in the Narva High School. Besides the teaching in the school, Jelena gives lectures and private lessons to Russophones who want to take the language proficiency exam required for Estonian citizenship.

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Narva, Estonia, 2016
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

The Estonian-Russian border from the tower of the Narva castle. In the background the Russian twin city of Ivangorod.

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Sillamae, Estonia, 2016
sillamae
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Overlooking the Baltic Sea, the city of Sillamäe has been an important industrial centre of the former U.S.S.R., producing military hardware and in particular in the uranium processing field. The whole industrial activity was kept under military secret and Sillamäe remained a closed town until the independence of Estonia in 1991: it didn't appear on official maps and its inhabitants weren't able to move outside without a specific authorization.

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Kohtla-Järve, Estonia, 2016
Kohtla-Järve
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Borys Tutuka proudly claims his Ukrainian origin. Ukrainian people were transferred to Estonia during the Soviet period and today they are the second biggest Russophone minority of the country, Kohtla-Järve.

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Narva, Estonia, 2016
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Ljubov Zvereva is the head of the most important association in Narva gathering disabled people and war wounded of the Russian community. The association helps them in finding
an occupation and in the everyday life activities, Narva.

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Sillamae, Estonia, 2016
sillamae
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

The theatre inside the Sillamäe Cultural Centre, one of the brightest and best kept example of the Stalinist architecture of the city.

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Narva, Estonia, 2016
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Alla Matveeva wearing traditional Russian clothes. Alla is the director of Svätogor, one of the slavic cultural centres of Narva, which has the aim of spreading and preserving the Russian traditions in the Ida-Viru county.

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Found objects
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

Everyday items found in situ belonging to the Soviet period. They show how deep was the process of Russification, started from the 50s, especially within the people's daily lives.

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Narva, Estonia, 2016
narva
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2016

One of the few cafés in Narva. Its twin city, Ivangorod , lies seamlessly after the border with Russia.