Frame 0004
Drawing Conflict: Cartoon Journalist ...
Bekaa
By travis beard
04 Feb 2015

Bekaa, Lebanon

February 4, 2015

Some say the Charlie Hebdo attack changed the political cartoon world forever and that the threat to cartoonists has never been so strong. However, should this perceived threat prevent cartoonists from still covering sensitive issues? Should all journalistic cartoonists feel threatened?

One cartoon journalist set out to show that cartoonists should not limit themselves. Jules Callis, who comes from the Netherlands, had clear doubts about his decision to travel to Lebanon to document the Syrian refugee crisis just days after the attack. However, Callis was not about to shy away from a subject and determinedly made the decision to travel to the Syrian border to tell the real story of Syria's refugees through comic journalism.

Frame 0004
Peter Greste Interview, Kenyan Electi...
Nairobi
By fahruq
23 Sep 2014

Raw footage of Peter Greste recorded during the Kenyan General election in March 2013. This was recorded before Peter was jailed in Egypt. He was recently released after over one year in prison.

Frame 0004
Safety Course for Syrian Journalists
Istanbul
By TTM Contributor 10
09 Jul 2014

A course has been set up to educate Syrian journalists, inside and outside of Syria, about occupational safety and information protection. Sponsored by al-Doha centre for the Freedom of Press, the course trains the journalists methods of protecting themselves and their information in the dangerous environment of the Syrian uprising. The course was held in Istanbul over a period of five days and was attended by 31 students. Al-Doha Centre paid for the costs of travelling and accommodation for the journalists who received certificates at the end.

Interviews:
1: Ibrahim al-Idilbi, Syrian media activist from Idlib, Cooperates with al-Jazeera
2: Hashem al-Abdullah, freelance journalist
3: Mour Mrtini, freelance journalist and an independent writer
4: Hadi al-Khateeb, trainer of the information safety course
5: Hassan al-Rashidi, trainer of the occupational safety course
Transcript:

Ibrahim al-idelbi:
“We are a group of activists inside Syria who came to Istanbul, in Turkey, to attend a course sponsored by al-Doha centre for the freedom of press. The course is intended to teach us how to protect our information and ourselves. We really needed a course like this and, as you know, the crisis has escalated in Syria, which is why occupational safety was the main aspect for this course. We also benefited a lot from the information they gave us about protecting the information that we obtain.”

Hashem al-Abdullah:
“We, as activists in Syria, started reporting events from Syria, but we lacked the simplest knowledge about protection of ourselves and our devices, that we used to transfer information. Through this course we were introduced to many methods for protecting information and for occupational safety that we did not know before.”

Nour Martini:
“It was announced that al-Doha centre set up a course to teach journalists about occupational and information safety, so I applied for this course. Since I am in constant contact with activists and journalists inside Syria, and since I am a woman spending time near the conflict areas in Syria, I need the training which al-Doha Centre is providing. We need to know these methods, not only for our own safety, but also for the safety of the network of journalists and news agencies that we deal with. The trainers were professionals, not only in terms of being news reporters, but also in digital security.”

Hadi al-Khateeb:
“I am an information safety and digital security trainer and I work with al-Doha Center. We have been training activists and journalists for two days about the issues of information safety and digital security. The training concentrated on the dangers journalists might face, concerning the data they have and the sources they work with. We also worked on the issue of protecting smartphones that are used by the journalists to write reports and to take photos. So we concentrated on the usage of these devices and the different strategies.” Hassan al-Rashidi:
“This course as you can see was set up for the sake of protecting Syrian journalists who work in areas of conflict. We taught them about security precautions that should be applied while on the ground and first aid techniques in case of injury. We also introduced them to the types of mines that are found in some areas and the actions a professional journalist should take if they find themselves in danger or stopped at a checkpoint. The way that a journalist should dress, for their own safety, so they do not look similar to government forces or any other armed group. We also talked about the ethics of the profession and ways in which a journalist should never behave, such as carrying a weapon or becoming a spy. We also taught them how to deliver this information to their colleagues who were not able to attend the course.”

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-003
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

Another man had already been killed by a teargas canister shot during previous protests. In reaction, young people from the Chepesi party rioted for days against the police, yelling slogans and calling them Katil€ (criminals, murderers).

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-005
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

The Popular Republican Pary (Cumhuriyet Halk Partisi, or CHP) is the longest standing party in Turkey. It represents the strongest left-wing political force in the country.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-010
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

Many young boys and men take to the streets. On one side, they throw stones and molotovs, on the other plastic bullets, teargas and Toma.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-011
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

After the Gezi Park riots, many movements emerged to oppose the AKP and its leader, Prime Minister Recip Teyyip Erdogan, who has enforced various restrictions on freedom of speech and the press.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-019
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

The protestors include both young and old people, the former in the front whilst the latter remain in the back to play a supporting role in clashes with the armed forces.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-020
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

In suburbs prone to such clashes, once often encounters strong local support.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-023
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

Since the beginning of the clashes, 9 people have died and more than 8163 have been injured. This does not include the number of arrests; it also makes the violence one of the most tragic events in recent Turkish history.

Thumb sm
Slavyansk 25-29/05 022
Slavyansk, Ukraine
By Andrey Borodulin
25 May 2014

The car in which Italian journalist Andrea Rocchelli, 30 and his Russian interpreter Andrey Mironov were riding before they were killed in eastern Ukraine while covering fighting between government forces and pro-Russia insurgents on May 24, 2014. The two men died when they were hit by mortar fire as they were taking shelter in a roadside ditch in Slavyansk according to French photographer William Roguelon who was travelling with them. Roquelon was wounded in the attack.

Thumb sm
Slavyansk 25-29/05 024
Slavyansk, Ukraine
By Andrey Borodulin
25 May 2014

The personal belongings of Italian journalist Andrea Rocchelli and Russian interpreter Andrey Mironov who were killed on May 24, 2014 while covering fighting between Ukrainian government forces and pro-Russian militia in Slavyansk in eastern Ukraine. The two men died when they were hit by a mortar while taking shelter in a roadside ditch.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
25 May 2014

The number of Turkish security forces deployed in the neighborhood has steadily increased since the first wave of violence. During the clashes, police never entered the heart of the suburb, but are now slowly making deeper forays into the neighborhood.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-007
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
25 May 2014

After weeks of protests following the Soma mine disaster, police resorted to using real ammunition during the most violent clashes. Previously, only rubber bullets were used; the use of live ammunition has since then led to causalities.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
25 May 2014

Neighborhood life only stops in the greatest moments of tension, when vendors close their shops in order to protect themselves and their belongings. Many watch the events from a distance.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
24 May 2014

22 May 2014. News of the shooting death of 30-year old Ugur Kurt was confirmed. He was killed by police in an Alevi mosque, or Cemevi, in the Okmaydani suburb of Istanbul.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-004
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
24 May 2014

Okmaydani is an far-left leaning neighbourhood where Turkish and Kurdish parties coexist. Due to its proximity to Taksim Square, it has been a major force in the protests surrounding the Gezi Park demonstrations.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-009
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
24 May 2014

Young boys and men take to the streets. On one side, they throw stones and molotovs. They are met with plastic bullets, teargas and armored police vehicles with water cannons.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
24 May 2014

A small demonstration of the DHKP/C (Revolutionary People's Liberation Party-Front) waves red flags through the neighborhood and shouting slogans in order to attract people into the streets.

The only signs left of the tension in Okmeydani from the previous days are poles wrecked by the protestors and some statements written on the walls in memory of Berkin Elvan, Urgu Kurt and Ayhan Yilmaz

The response after the arrests was lively.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-018
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
24 May 2014

The streets fill with teargas and barricades.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-021
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
24 May 2014

Once the police leave, people armed with guns and rifles come out to shoot security cameras. They want to prove who is in control of that part of the neighborhood.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-017
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
23 May 2014

For many on the political left in Turkey, conditions in the country are rapidly becoming a reason for social upheaval. The extreme poverty of some suburbs, the deaths of 300 miners in Soma, the marginalization of minorities, the war on the Syrian border, police oppression of protestors and restrictions on the press are exacerbating tensions in an already politically divided society.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-012
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
22 May 2014

The grievances that led to protests are tied to religious and communal issues. A large percentage of the protestors come from the Alevi (Alawite) sect, which has been long aligned with secular leftist parties. The Alevis have traditionally been lower-class and socially disadvantaged and have not benefitted from the prosperity that has taken part in other parts of Istanbul and Turkey. The Alevis and the left-wing movements they support stand in staunch opposition to the conservative, Sunni-Islamist ideology endorsed by Prime Minister Erdogan.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-014
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
22 May 2014

A funeral procession begins at Cem Evi. Starting at 18:00, the procession will continue toward the house where Ugur Kurt used to live. His body was eventually taken for burial to his hometown of Sivas.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-015
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
22 May 2014

After the demonstration in support of Ugur's family, the streets are empty. Around 19:30 a group of youngsters with their faces covered takes to one of Istanbul's main streets of Istanbul and provokes the police by throwing stones. The security forces, armed with Toma and teargas, respond immediately and disperse the crowd.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
22 May 2014

Canisters left by police are collected during the clashes.

Thumb sm
Okmaydani-arianna-pagani-022
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
22 May 2014

Neither the opposition parties nor the media are able to counter the growing power of the conservative ideology of the AKP and the strength of the Turkish state.

Thumb sm
Media Censorship in Venezuela 4
Caracas, Venezuela
By Carlos Hernandez
17 Feb 2014

Journalists marching in Caracas, Venezuela to demand press freedom on 12 February 2014.

Thumb sm
Media Censorship in Venezuela 8
Caracas, Venezuela
By Carlos Hernandez
17 Feb 2014

Journalists protesting against media censorship and oppression in Venezuela.

Thumb sm
Media Censorship in Venezuela 7
Caracas, Venezuela
By Carlos Hernandez
17 Feb 2014

Journalists marching in Caracas, Venezuela to demand press freedom on 12 February 2014.

Thumb sm
Media Censorship in Venezuela 6
Caracas, Venezuela
By Carlos Hernandez
17 Feb 2014

Journalists marching in Caracas, Venezuela to demand press freedom on 12 February 2014.

Thumb sm
Media Censorship in Venezuela 9
Caracas, Venezuela
By Carlos Hernandez
17 Feb 2014

Journalists's protest against the media censorship causing newspapers to close and journalists to lose their jobs in Venezuela.

Thumb sm
Gezi Gets Gassed -Black and White- (1...
Istanbul, Turkey
By umutvedat
19 Jun 2013

Photojournalists witnessed civilians being attacked by water tanks. Demonstrations took place beside Taksim Square as citizens protested against the government after a mall project that would take the place of Gezi Park was established. The protests were initially peaceful but ongoing violence has been taking place for over three weeks and continues to escalate in Istanbul, Turkey. June 2013.

Thumb sm
Gezi Gets Gassed (33 of 46)
Istanbul, Turkey
By umutvedat
19 Jun 2013

A journalist captures the moment with his camera.

Thumb sm
The Battle for Kabul
Kabul, Afghanistan
By johnjournalist
25 May 2013

An Afghan Security Forces soldier holds the line between clashes and journalists in Kabul. Taliban members and Afghan forces fought a six hour gun battle in the city center. Kabul, Afghanistan. May 2013.

Frame 0004
Transition
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 15 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) My name is Wissam and I'm from Syria, I'm a student of Journalism in my final year ...In Moscow The reason why I came to study in a country that lacks freedom of press is that Russia was the only country to give me a visa after I resigned. Oh, I forgot to tell you... I was an officer in the Syrian army

(VO) After the Syrian dictator Hafez al-Assad's death, his son Bashar inherited the power for that, the Constitution was amended, in the world's fastest assembly. The former Constitution demanded that the minimum age for being president should be 40 years of age. They've changed it for 34, the age of Bashar at the time I realized it was about time to write my resignation letter and leave Syria I didn't see my mom for the last 8 years I was afraid of visiting my family in Syria since an old friend from the army told me I was wanted
by the Syrian intelligence they've received a report from the embassy in Moscow saying I was against the regime I remembered my father at that point When I was a kid, he used to say: “The walls have ears” By that time, I didn't understand He lived 79 years in fear. When I was in the army, he advised me not to speak about the regime in front of other officers I used to find it funny, him worried about me, and then he told me: “These people are criminals, you didn't see what I saw” Once, he told me about an event so that I could understand his uncommon fear of the regime He told me how the army came and took one person from each house during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in 1980, in Aleppo They took around 100 people, among them children and elderly. It was a very difficult moment for my father, when he saw his childhood friends lined against the wall and get executed These crimes were called Al Mashariqa Massacre, named after the neighborhood where it occurred That's how Hafez al-Assad controlled the country for 3 decades, committing the worse massacres of these times The most famous of them was the Hama Massacre In this city, he killed dozens of thousands of civilians through shelling and artillery in 1982

(VO) In March 2011, the revolution began in Syria I realized then that the blood series started again The dictator inherited from his father not only the country, but also his criminality The difference this time was the will of the people, which had already changed with the generations The dictator used all means of intimidation, such as executions, torture and rape to eliminate the peaceful protests He counts on the support of loyal states, such as Iran and Russia, which provide him with weapons and hinder international resolutions against him But with the continuous bloodshed, people decided to take up arms and defend themselves After the liberation of wide areas in Aleppo, I decided to go back there where I grew up and from where I was away for a long time

(VO) This is the border of Bab al Salam, the security entrance which leads to Turkey

Bashar’s hired thugs, the “shabihha”, spent a long time in the region stealing The “Shabihha” used these offices to torment civilians A bunch of impolite people who got from the regime the power of making Syrian people’s lives unbearable

(Wissam says) But, thank God for the Free Syrian Army and free militias, we are free!

(Driver shout) Peace be upon you!

(VO) We entered Aleppo during the night to avoid the air strikes and snipers I was afraid, but my fears spread away when I saw the first FSA control station

(Militia) Peace be upon you! Where are you from?
(Driver) Aleppo (Militia) Where in Aleppo? (Driver) Al Jamiliyeh (Militia) Show me your documents (Driver) Here it is (Militia) Brother, could you show me your document as well? There are people trying to infiltrate during the night
(Driver) Ok, ok Did we arrive in Al Mushat already?
(Militia) It's Al Mushat! (Driver) We didn't realize because it's night We are part of your Tawhid Brigade
(Militia) Welcome! Honestly, it's because the regime infiltrated last week and took two of us
(Driver) Really? (Militia) Yes! Take care in Al Sinaa! The regime's snipers killed already 4 people there!

(VO) So much destruction made impossible for me to recognize the streets where I grew up The smell of blood replaced the fragrance of flowers
The sound of shelling took the place of birds singing The birds, just like the Syrian people, either died or ran away Young people lost their limbs in savage shelling I couldn't see any of this on Russian TV in 2 years of revolution World history doesn't know anyone who have killed its own people and destroyed its own country such as Bashar al Assad This fool overcame the madness of Nero burning Rome, and didn't spare women, children or elderly

(Wissam) This is an innocent 2year old child “Mig” bomber planes killed her parents and she was rescued by a civilian who brought her to a temporary hospital

(Wissam) Cluster bombs are still incubated. There it is. Bombs that didn't explode. It's a danger to every civilian who lives in this building, because inside there are dozens of bombs. It's internationally forbidden to use these bombs in populated areas. But this criminal regime doesn't see the difference between civilians and militaries. It points to residential buildings just to force people to leave Syria

(Wissam) This... We can hear the snipers, who’d target anyone that crosses the parallel street. They are based there, to the left. These are residential areas, which were abandoned because of the air strikes. Assad's snipers are on the top of the buildings. Anything that crosses their field of view will be targeted: children, women, and elderly... Even a dog or a cat!

(Wissam) Now we are in a building in Salah al Deen neighborhood and, because of the snipers, we are going to cross trough these wholes that the FSA opened. The fear of snipers forced these people to flee. Even they left their clothes behind. They left everything in the wardrobe. Here is a sniper shot. Looking down... Two more shots. And one here, through the glass. I can't continue, or a sniper will notice us.
This is a kitchen in a residence. They even targeted a kitchen... There are no terrorists here. It's a peaceful people's home.

(FSA soldier) Can you see him? (Wissam) I see! (FSA soldier) Do you want me to open the curtain a little bit? (Wissam) No, no, I see it! (Wissam) That's a mosque’s minaret in front of this house. There it is one, of them... There are many snipers based there. He shoots! He shoots, targeting civilians...

(FSA soldier) I'm an army deserter (Wissam) Why did you desert? (FSA soldier) Because of the injustice we presented (Wissam) Where did you serve? (FSA soldier) In Qatana's 10th platoon (Wissam) Did they order you to kill peaceful protesters? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) Or isn't it true? (FSA soldier) Of course, and they gave us pills... (Wissam) They medicated you? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) And the protesters? (FSA soldier) They'd put us in front of the protesters and told us to open fire. They didn't have permission to pass by. We wanted to protect the people, but we were only protecting a throne.

(VO) After all this, I arrived to my uncle's home. I wanted to surprise him with my visit. But I was the one surprised. The building was already empty. Aleppo is a historical city that the terror of the regime turned into a ghost city. People abandoned
their neighborhoods, leaving behind piles of pain and destruction that tears won't eliminate from
memory.

(Wissam) Did they shoot you in your leg? (Old man) They shot 4 times (Wissam) 4 times! (Old man) Russian shots AK-47 And what happened to you? (Old man) It’s broke! This bone here was shattered as well. Yes, it’s broke. (Wissam) Was it the Syrian army? (Old man) It was Bashar al-Assad's army! (Wissam) May God heal you! Who destroyed all this?

(Old man) It was his bombers and mortars, which invaded the Martyrs' street. We renamed it... (Wissam) Martyr's street? (Old man) We called it this way... (Wissam) Why Martyr's street? (Old man) Because during peaceful protests the regime opened fire and killed 14 civilians in here. The army sacked us, stole us, emptied our homes.

(Wissam) “Bashar's men passed here”... This school was used as a prison and headquarters. It was terrible for this neighborhood’s people.

(Wissam) “Scud” soviet missiles are sent from the capital, about a Km from Aleppo. Artillery and aviation are the means used to terrify the remaining population and force it to obey

(Boy) He attacked us with missiles, cluster bombs, “Mig” and “Shukhoi” airplanes...

(Woman) We came here because of Bashar. May he go to hell!

(Wissam) Why are you in this mosque? (Kid) Because of the bombings (Wissam) did you flee to the mosque because of the bombings?

(Wissam) What's your name? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) What? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) How old are you, Kifaa? (Girl) I'm seven years old (Wissam) Why do you live in the mosque? (Girl) They bombed our house

(VO) Terrifying the local population and destroying their homes, forcing people to flea the homeland: this is the regime's policy to try to eliminate the revolution.

(Refugee) The air force is bombing the Northern villages (Wissam) The air force? (Refugee) Yes (Wissam) Might God protect you! Is your family in Turkey?
(Refugee) Yes

Frame 0004
Transition (Part 1 of 2)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

PART 2: http://transterramedia.com/media/18536

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 26 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) My name is Wissam and I'm from Syria, I'm a student of Journalism in my final year ...In Moscow The reason why I came to study in a country that lacks freedom of press is that Russia was the only country to give me a visa after I resigned. Oh, I forgot to tell you... I was an officer in the Syrian army

(VO) After the Syrian dictator Hafez al-Assad's death, his son Bashar inherited the power for that, the Constitution was amended, in the world's fastest assembly. The former Constitution demanded that the minimum age for being president should be 40 years of age. They've changed it for 34, the age of Bashar at the time I realized it was about time to write my resignation letter and leave Syria I didn't see my mom for the last 8 years I was afraid of visiting my family in Syria since an old friend from the army told me I was wanted by the Syrian intelligence they've received a report from the embassy in Moscow saying I was against the regime I remembered my father at that point When I was a kid, he used to say: “The walls have ears” By that time, I didn't understand He lived 79 years in fear. When I was in the army, he advised me not to speak about the regime in front of other officers I used to find it funny, him worried about me, and then he told me: “These people are criminals, you didn't see what I saw” Once, he told me about an event so that I could understand his uncommon fear of the regime He told me how the army came and took one person from each house during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in 1980, in Aleppo They took around 100 people, among them children and elderly. It was a very difficult moment for my father, when he saw his childhood friends lined against the wall and get executed These crimes were called Al Mashariqa Massacre, named after the neighborhood where it occurred That's how Hafez al-Assad controlled the country for 3 decades, committing the worse massacres of these times The most famous of them was the Hama Massacre In this city, he killed dozens of thousands of civilians through shelling and artillery in 1982

(VO) In March 2011, the revolution began in Syria I realized then that the blood series started again The dictator inherited from his father not only the country, but also his criminality The difference this time was the will of the people, which had already changed with the generations The dictator used all means of intimidation, such as executions, torture and rape to eliminate the peaceful protests He counts on the support of loyal states, such as Iran and Russia, which provide him with weapons and hinder international resolutions against him But with the continuous bloodshed, people decided to take up arms and defend themselves After the liberation of wide areas in Aleppo, I decided to go back there where I grew up and from where I was away for a long time

Frame 0004
Transition (Part 2 of 2)
Syria
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 26 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) This is the border of Bab al Salam, the security entrance which leads to Turkey

Bashar’s hired thugs, the “shabihha”, spent a long time in the region stealing The “Shabihha” used these offices to torment civilians A bunch of impolite people who got from the regime the power of making Syrian people’s lives unbearable

(Wissam says) But, thank God for the Free Syrian Army and free militias, we are free!

(Driver shout) Peace be upon you!

(VO) We entered Aleppo during the night to avoid the air strikes and snipers I was afraid, but my fears spread away when I saw the first FSA control station

(Militia) Peace be upon you! Where are you from? (Driver) Aleppo (Militia) Where in Aleppo? (Driver) Al Jamiliyeh (Militia) Show me your documents (Driver) Here it is (Militia) Brother, could you show me your document as well? There are people trying to infiltrate during the night (Driver) Ok, ok Did we arrive in Al Mushat already? (Militia) It's Al Mushat! (Driver) We didn't realize because it's night We are part of your Tawhid Brigade (Militia) Welcome! Honestly, it's because the regime infiltrated last week and took two of us (Driver) Really? (Militia) Yes! Take care in Al Sinaa! The regime's snipers killed already 4 people there!

(VO) So much destruction made impossible for me to recognize the streets where I grew up The smell of blood replaced the fragrance of flowers The sound of shelling took the place of birds singing The birds, just like the Syrian people, either died or ran away Young people lost their limbs in savage shelling I couldn't see any of this on Russian TV in 2 years of revolution World history doesn't know anyone who have killed its own people and destroyed its own country such as Bashar al Assad This fool overcame the madness of Nero burning Rome, and didn't spare women, children or elderly

(Wissam) This is an innocent 2year old child “Mig” bomber planes killed her parents and she was rescued by a civilian who brought her to a temporary hospital

(Wissam) Cluster bombs are still incubated. There it is. Bombs that didn't explode. It's a danger to every civilian who lives in this building, because inside there are dozens of bombs. It's internationally forbidden to use these bombs in populated areas. But this criminal regime doesn't see the difference between civilians and militaries. It points to residential buildings just to force people to leave Syria

(Wissam) This... We can hear the snipers, who’d target anyone that crosses the parallel street. They are based there, to the left. These are residential areas, which were abandoned because of the air strikes. Assad's snipers are on the top of the buildings. Anything that crosses their field of view will be targeted: children, women, and elderly... Even a dog or a cat!

(Wissam) Now we are in a building in Salah al Deen neighborhood and, because of the snipers, we are going to cross trough these wholes that the FSA opened. The fear of snipers forced these people to flee. Even they left their clothes behind. They left everything in the wardrobe. Here is a sniper shot. Looking down... Two more shots. And one here, through the glass. I can't continue, or a sniper will notice us. This is a kitchen in a residence. They even targeted a kitchen... There are no terrorists here. It's a peaceful people's home.

(FSA soldier) Can you see him? (Wissam) I see! (FSA soldier) Do you want me to open the curtain a little bit? (Wissam) No, no, I see it! (Wissam) That's a mosque’s minaret in front of this house. There it is one, of them... There are many snipers based there. He shoots! He shoots, targeting civilians...

(FSA soldier) I'm an army deserter (Wissam) Why did you desert? (FSA soldier) Because of the injustice we presented (Wissam) Where did you serve? (FSA soldier) In Qatana's 10th platoon (Wissam) Did they order you to kill peaceful protesters? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) Or isn't it true? (FSA soldier) Of course, and they gave us pills... (Wissam) They medicated you? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) And the protesters? (FSA soldier) They'd put us in front of the protesters and told us to open fire. They didn't have permission to pass by. We wanted to protect the people, but we were only protecting a throne.

(VO) After all this, I arrived to my uncle's home. I wanted to surprise him with my visit. But I was the one surprised. The building was already empty. Aleppo is a historical city that the terror of the regime turned into a ghost city. People abandoned their neighborhoods, leaving behind piles of pain and destruction that tears won't eliminate from
memory.

(Wissam) Did they shoot you in your leg? (Old man) They shot 4 times (Wissam) 4 times! (Old man) Russian shots AK-47 And what happened to you? (Old man) It’s broke! This bone here was shattered as well. Yes, it’s broke. (Wissam) Was it the Syrian army? (Old man) It was Bashar al-Assad's army! (Wissam) May God heal you! Who destroyed all this?

(Old man) It was his bombers and mortars, which invaded the Martyrs' street. We renamed it... (Wissam) Martyr's street? (Old man) We called it this way... (Wissam) Why Martyr's street? (Old man) Because during peaceful protests the regime opened fire and killed 14 civilians in here. The army sacked us, stole us, emptied our homes.

(Wissam) “Bashar's men passed here”... This school was used as a prison and headquarters. It was terrible for this neighborhood’s people.

(Wissam) “Scud” soviet missiles are sent from the capital, about a Km from Aleppo. Artillery and aviation are the means used to terrify the remaining population and force it to obey

(Boy) He attacked us with missiles, cluster bombs, “Mig” and “Shukhoi” airplanes...

(Woman) We came here because of Bashar. May he go to hell!

(Wissam) Why are you in this mosque? (Kid) Because of the bombings (Wissam) did you flee to the mosque because of the bombings?

(Wissam) What's your name? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) What? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) How old are you, Kifaa? (Girl) I'm seven years old (Wissam) Why do you live in the mosque? (Girl) They bombed our house

(VO) Terrifying the local population and destroying their homes, forcing people to flea the homeland: this is the regime's policy to try to eliminate the revolution.

(Refugee) The air force is bombing the Northern villages (Wissam) The air force? (Refugee) Yes (Wissam) Might God protect you! Is your family in Turkey? (Refugee) Yes

Thumb sm
Being a gay journalist in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
By Joan Planas
10 Jan 2013

Things are changing in Hong Kong since the city has become a part of China. Josh is a Hong Kong gay journalist who is afraid of what might happen in the future, for now he is a victim of censorship that affects his profession and his privacy. His desire is to scape from Hong Kong.

Thumb sm
Being a gay journalist in Hong Kong
Hong Kong, China
By Serene Yordi
10 Jan 2013

Things are changing in Hong Kong since the city has become a part of China. Josh is a Hong Kong gay journalist who is afraid of what might happen in the future, for now he is a victim of censorship that affects his profession and his privacy. His desire is to scape from Hong Kong.

To view video, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/20731
To view article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/20225