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The Rise Of The Anonymous (2 of 13)
Tehran, Iran
By Hanif
09 Feb 2013

2 January 2013 – SHAHIN, addicted to drug comes near the circle and the volunteer members welcome her. She decided to go to the camp to get healthy.

There are no official statistics of the number of homelesses in Tehran, but unofficial statistics show that they are about 12,000 people.

Some, though not all, of Iran's homeless are addicted to Crystal (Methamphetamine). The homeless are supported by an organization that is also made up of young men and women that cook for them and then distribute the food. They offer advice and counseling to the drug addicts.

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The Rise Of The Anonymous (1 of 13)
Tehran, Iran
By Hanif
09 Feb 2013

1 January 2013 – Darwish (center), a homeless and addicted to drug stands in circle of Toloo. In circle people talk about their senses and experiences and Darwish sometimes reads a poem.

The main causes of these people homelessing are their mental illnesses, addiction,family weakness in livelihoods and suffering from Infectious Diseases. Some of these families have no news of the fate of their children whereas most of these missing people can't remember their past because of their mental illnesses.

Some, though not all, of Iran's homeless are addicted to Crystal (Methamphetamine). The homeless are supported by an organization that is also made up of young men and women that cook for them and then distribute the food. They offer advice and counseling to the drug addicts.

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The Rise Of The Anonymous
Tehran, Iran
By U.S. Editor
08 Feb 2013

"Toloo Institute" in Persian means "The Rise Of The Anonymous" is the name of a charity organization. Every week its members salute the homeless people of south Tehran with warm home made meals, chat with them and introduce them to this institution. People who suffer from addiction are treated in the rehabilitation centers with the institute's sponsorship and for the ones that have nowhere to live, they provide shelter. Some of those who take part in these events were once suffering from the same complications however, they have now overcome those hardships with the aid of this institution and are now trying to help in kind.

Some, though not all, of Iran's homeless are addicted to hashish which they smoke in water pipes (nargileh). The homeless are supported by an organization that is also made up of young men and women that cook for them and then distribute the food. They offer advice and counseling to the drug addicts.

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Homeless persons in Athens (1 of 14)
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
27 Jan 2013

A homeless man with a handamde sign that reads "Please help me I have been homeless for many months"

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New York's Poorest Ignored by Politic...
Bronx, New York, US
By mcseaniew
11 Jan 2013

The community of Highbridge in the South Bronx has never been an affluent part of the United States, much of which was created in the 1940's to accommodate a huge incline in immigration to the city. Today it is home to over 35,000 people, the majority of whom are first- or second-generation immigrants from Dominica, Puerto Rico or Africa. The buildings that were created to house thousands who couldn't afford townhouses and brownstones, are now crumbling. Crime and drug abuse are sky-high. Income disparity in the US is at an all-time high. New York City is home to the most millionaires in the country. But it's also facing a food crisis. Nowhere is this starker than the South Bronx, America's poorest district, where over a quarter of a million people live below the poverty line. No wonder more folks than ever are relying on the Highbridge Community Church food pantry, run by local nonprofit the Muslim Women's Institute for Research and Development (MWIRD). But the pantry faces a closure that would plunge over 2,500 locals into an even-deeper plight.

Welfare is dwindling, and those who need it most find the labyrinthine processes almost impossible to navigate. Many don't speak English as their first language, making the system impenetrable. People who lost their jobs in the recession are struggling to make ends meet. Organisations like the Muslim Women's Institute are many folks' first - and last - resort if they want to eat well. But with the economy the way it is private funds are slipping away, and the pantry the MWI provides could go out of business at any moment. America's philosophies have always made it difficult to allot public funds to society's poorest. But now they face a crisis like never before.

Ibrahim Ramey is a long-time human rights advocate. A Washington DC resident, he has been involved in educating Muslims and Americans about political action in countries as far-flung as Tanzania and Afghanistan. Ibrahim is on the board of the Muslim Women's Institute, the Temple of Understanding (which aims to promote religious coexistence) and the Climate Crisis Coalition. He is also vice president of the Steering Committees of the Religious NGO Community at the UN. Ibrahim is increasingly worried about the lack of political dialogue concerning New York's poor, and the plight of those maligned by the current economic meltdown.

The extreme poor's lifelines are being pulled from them, creating a forgotten underclass no-one is addressing. This 4-6min video reveals the vital role the pantry plays in its neighbourhood, the Bronxites who are being marginalized and the stoic folks who run the pantry, despite the specter of closure remaining ever-present.

Additional footage:

  • Interview with local mother. Discusses how the local govt does nothing, but that the way the pantry is run (because they have no cash) makes her feel as if she is begging.

  • Interview with an older lady about the state of New York City now, compared to decades gone. She complains that 'we don't help others' in this country, mentioning how people have struggled through times like this for years.

  • Interview with a Spanish-speaking middle-aged man, about New York and how difficult it is for people to navigate welfare.

  • Much additional b-roll and OTF footage of the pantry, people cooking fresh food and queuing to get supplies.

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Friends in Low Places 17
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
19 Dec 2012

Fisherman walks out of his the underpass where he lives, carrying "Mr Happy," his homemade whip.

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HOMELESSNESS IN ATHENS
Athens, Greece
By Mais Istanbuli
17 Dec 2012

The deep economic crisis that grabbed the Greek society for over 4 years causing a huge impact on Greek Citizens.

The Greek government, with the IMF's help, officially states that the unemployment have reached 28 percent, which many people find unbelievable. A big increase in taxes, public transport fees, and salaries, along with the reduction of public spending in social welfare cost many of people loose their homes, their jobs, and in some cases their lives.

Before the crisis, most of the homeless population in Greece consisted of either alcoholics, illegal drug users, or former prisoners.

Now-a-days, the homeless population consists of people with diplomas and foreign language speakers, who in a very few months have seen their lives change forever.

NGOs such as the Medicines san Frontier officially stated that Greece looks more like a war zone than a peaceful country, due to the humanitarian crisis it's facing.

Immigrants and local citizens are overcrowding the NGOs' offices and clinics asking for the simplest medicine and food. There are public cases of cancer patients who are unable to get treatment due to the government's decision to impose a 25 Euro fee as hospital entry for all patients.

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Friends in Low Places 9
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Frog and Fred, Gulf war veterans, sit in the park near downtown.

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Friends in Low Places 10
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Fisherman sits down to dinner in the cave that he shares with other vets, an HIV positive security guard, a circus worker, and his twenty cats.

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Friends in Low Places 11
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Fisherman, Gulf War veteran, stands in the park he uses to rest in the day time.

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Friends in Low Places 14
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

A catfish, caught by Fisherman, flounders on a rope in the Bayou.

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Friends in Low Places 13
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Fisherman lights his way in his cave with a head lamp. He has no source of heat or light.

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Friends in Low Places 12
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Frog, Gulf War veteran, sits in the cave he sleeps in beneath downtown Houston.

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Friends in Low Places 18
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

A bottle of vodka left by the bayou, beneath a veteran's temporary home.

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Friends in Low Places 5
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Fisherman fries the catfish he caught in Buffalo Bayou in oil.

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Friends in Low Places 6
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Laundry drying outside on the edge of Buffalo Bayou, beneath "the caves."

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Friends in Low Places 7
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Fisherman feeds the twenty cats that he's raised from kittens. They live with him in his cave.

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Friends in Low Places 8
Houston, Texas
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Beneath a bayou overpass, the entrance to a cave.

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Friends in Low Places
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Houston, Texas, 2013. Buffalo Bayou, many homeless live along this stretch of water that runs through Houston's downtown.

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Friends in Low Places
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Houston, Texas, 2012. Fisherman shows his personal possessions hidden in his cave. He has cooking supplies, fruit, fishing rods, clothing.

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Friends in Low Places
By Spike Johnson
13 Dec 2012

Houston, Texas, 2012. Frog shows scars from conflict. A bullet entered and lodged in his shoulder while serving as a Marine in the Gulf War. Without access to healthcare, he self medicates buying Hydrocodone illegally on the streets. He now admits he's addicted to the painkiller.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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SYRIA - THE FORGOTTEN OF CAMP AZAZ
Azaz, Syria
By Mais Istanbuli
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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TYPHOON BOPHA POUNDS SOUTHERN PHILIPP...
Southern Philippines
By Editor's Picks
05 Dec 2012

Hundreds were killed and thousands evacuated as super typhoon Bopha raged in the Southern Philippines, leaving homeless survivors to seek shelter and deal with the aftermath

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FINANCIAL CRISIS IN SPAIN - Beirut Ed...
Barcelona, Spain
By Beirut Editor's Picks
29 Oct 2012

Thousands of workers took to the streets in Barcelona, in the eighth general strike to protest against labor reform. The educational community protest against cuts and the rising ratio of students per classroom in schools and colleges.

Each day in Spain more than 500 families are evicted from their homes. 22 percent of Spanish households are living in poverty and nearly 600,000 have no income. It is expected that in the coming months this situation will worsen.

The CGT and CNT anarchist labor unions called a 24 hour strike. The day of action is in defense of public services and a protest against social cuts and unemployment. They also complain that salaries in Spain are the lowest in Europe while the unemployment rate is the highest: it is over the 25% of the population

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Spanish crisis (4 of 20)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
26 Oct 2012

Woman begging.
Barcelona, Spain. The economic crisis is creating a bag of marginality. Faced with the alternative of not finding work people are in the need of begging on the street. Women and children are the most vulnerable in crisis situations.

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Mali Walls
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
30 Sep 2012

A displaced man from Tessit looks out to a brewing storm on the northern edges of Bamako where he has found shelter. Since the MNLA takeover of the north earlier this year, the U.N. Refugee agency estimates 450,000 people have left the region.