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Asylum Seekers in Spain 37
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, arrives at home in Barcelona, Spain, with her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 39
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, arrives at home in Barcelona, Spain, with her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 40
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, does her laundry at home in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 41
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, walks in Barcelona city center, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 38
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, wait to start a music concert in Centre Civic Drassanes, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 42
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, wait for the start of a music concert in Centre Civic Drassanes, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 43
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, meets her brother Ivan at his bar in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura
Bujumbura, Burundi
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday, May 10  to protest the decision by the Burundi Constitutional Court to allow President Pierre Nkurunziza to seek a third term in the presidential elections in June.

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 01
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 02
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 03
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 04
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 05
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 06
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 07
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 08
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza. This mother with a child on her back raises her hands as policemen wanted to harass her during this demonstration

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 09
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza. This mother with a child on her back resisted policemen who wanted to harass her as she was protesting against the 3rd term bid of Pierre Nkurunziza

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 10
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Women's Protest in Bujumbura 11
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Women in Bujumbura took to the streets on Sunday May 10 to say no to the 3rd term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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WWII: Women of the Red Army 70 Years ...
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

This collection features portraits of women veterans of WWII who volunteered and were conscripted to serve in the Soviet Red Army. As Moscow filled up on May 9, 2015 to celebrate 70 years since Victory in what the Soviets called, and some Russians today call the Great Patriotic War, TTM contributor Jonathan Alpeyrie was able to meet and interview nine of these women, most of them grandmothers today, donning their military decorations for the festivities.

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Born in 1925, 90 year-old Nina has two children, five grand children, and 5 great grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in 1943 on the 4th Ukrainian front. At 16 years-old Nina was incorporated into a battalion following the army’s move Westward towards Prague, where she took part in the battle to retake the capital of Czechoslovakia in early 1945. During her time on the front she was in charge of various traffic regulation duties. 

“I took care of traffic regulations on the road leading to the front lines where vehicles and troops were passing," she recalls. She remembers also being afraid of the intense fighting going on around her at the time, especially in Western Ukraine where the fighting was very hard. "We fought for the unity of the Ukraine, and what is happening now is incomprehensible," she says sharply when asked about the current situation in Ukraine. "It is bad for everyone."

Born in 1924, 90 year-old Alexandra has two children and five grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in the town of Kalatch in the Voronezh region of central Russia, she was transferred to the front lines in December 1941, only 17 years old. 

“I was a nurse in a train hospital which moved along the front lines," she recalls. The hospital train would pick up the wounded and carry them back away from the fighting to field hospitals. “Some days, there were so many wounded soldiers that we were forced to travel on top of the train cars!” Alexandra remembers. In 1943, she fell ill and was sent to Tbilisi Georgia to recuperate. It is there that she met her future husband. “My most vivid memory was the day of our victory on May 9th 1945. We danced so much that day..."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

 

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Women of the Red Army 05
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1924, 90 year-old Alexandra has two children and five grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in the town of Kalatch in the Voronezh region of central Russia, she was transferred to the front lines in December 1941, only 17 years old.

“I was a nurse in a train hospital which moved along the front lines," she recalls. The hospital train would pick up the wounded and carry them back away from the fighting to field hospitals. “Some days, there were so many wounded soldiers that we were forced to travel on top of the train cars!” Alexandra remembers. In 1943, she fell ill and was sent to Tbilisi Georgia to recuperate. It is there that she met her future husband. “My most vivid memory was the day of our victory on May 9th 1945. We danced so much that day..."

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Women of the Red Army 06
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1924, 90 year-old Alexandra has two children and five grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in the town of Kalatch in the Voronezh region of central Russia, she was transferred to the front lines in December 1941, only 17 years old.

“I was a nurse in a train hospital which moved along the front lines," she recalls. The hospital train would pick up the wounded and carry them back away from the fighting to field hospitals. “Some days, there were so many wounded soldiers that we were forced to travel on top of the train cars!” Alexandra remembers. In 1943, she fell ill and was sent to Tbilisi Georgia to recuperate. It is there that she met her future husband. “My most vivid memory was the day of our victory on May 9th 1945. We danced so much that day..."

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Women of the Red Army 07
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1931, 85 year-old Zinaida has one child, and one grand child. She was drafted in to the Red Army as part of a Ukrainian partisan outfit near the town of Hmelnick in Western Ukraine.

“I was 12 years-old when German soldiers took over our house. We fled to the forest with my brother Maxime. There, we managed to join a Communist partisan group," she recalls. “I would cook for the soldiers as well as provide important information for them by spying on German troops' movement. I remained with the same partisan unit for the entire war." By the end of the war, the group was hiding in the Carpathian Mountains. Her greatest memory of the war is the ‘Katioucha' song Red Army soldier sang when they liberated her native village, she tells us.

Zinaida left Ukraine in 2008 in order to join her only daughter in Russia to live together. When asked about the current conflict in Ukraine, she says, “I miss Ukraine a lot. We left some family there, and we are afraid of this new conflict."

"We will not return until the war ends," she says sadly.

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Women of the Red Army 08
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1931, 85 year-old Zinaida has one child, and one grand child. She was drafted in to the Red Army as part of a Ukrainian partisan outfit near the town of Hmelnick in Western Ukraine.

“I was 12 years-old when German soldiers took over our house. We fled to the forest with my brother Maxime. There, we managed to join a Communist partisan group," she recalls. “I would cook for the soldiers as well as provide important information for them by spying on German troops' movement. I remained with the same partisan unit for the entire war." By the end of the war, the group was hiding in the Carpathian Mountains. Her greatest memory of the war is the ‘Katioucha' song Red Army soldier sang when they liberated her native village, she tells us.

Zinaida left Ukraine in 2008 in order to join her only daughter in Russia to live together. When asked about the current conflict in Ukraine, she says, “I miss Ukraine a lot. We left some family there, and we are afraid of this new conflict."

"We will not return until the war ends," she says sadly.

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Women of the Red Army 09
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1930, 84 year-old Nakia has five children, and one grand child. During the war, she was forced to work in a factory, which produced spare parts for the war effort in Tirsa, Tartastan. Working in a factory as an 11 year-old for the war effort was a sacrifice for many reasons. Each day she had to walk 30 kilometers to “go to the factory from my village, and walk each night back the same way," she recalls. Some nights she had to work nights as the heavy losses incurred on the front lines required constant work. Her most difficult memory of the war was the lack of food.

“We had nothing to eat," she remembers. "We had to scrape the earth in a near by field in order to find roots and vegetables. I was scared, scared all the time," she admits. But when victory day arrived on May 9th, she felt this was the best gift one could have given her.

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Women of the Red Army 10
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1930, 84 year-old Nakia has five children, and one grand child. During the war, she was forced to work in a factory, which produced spare parts for the war effort in Tirsa, Tartastan. Working in a factory as an 11 year-old for the war effort was a sacrifice for many reasons. Each day she had to walk 30 kilometers to “go to the factory from my village, and walk each night back the same way," she recalls. Some nights she had to work nights as the heavy losses incurred on the front lines required constant work. Her most difficult memory of the war was the lack of food.

“We had nothing to eat," she remembers. "We had to scrape the earth in a near by field in order to find roots and vegetables. I was scared, scared all the time," she admits. But when victory day arrived on May 9th, she felt this was the best gift one could have given her.

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Women of the Red Army 11
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1927, 88 year-old Ivannikova has five children, 12 grand children, and 8 great grand children. During the war she was a military train conductor in Saratov in South East Russia.

“I was in a technical high school to learn how to drive trains when the war began," she remembers. She started to drive military trains in 1943. “Most of the time we would transport ammunitions to the front lines. But sometimes, we did not know what the cargo contained, as it was secret."

Though German planes never attacked her train, she remembers being scared all the time. “I used to have nightmares each night,” she recalls. She also remembers the day of victory. She cried a lot remembering the death of so many people, but said, “it was a great day for me, because we won, and the war was finally over.”

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Women of the Red Army 13
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1925, 90 year-old Nina has two children, five grand children, and 5 great grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in 1943 on the 4th Ukrainian front. At 16 years-old Nina was incorporated into a battalion following the army’s move Westward towards Prague, where she took part in the battle to retake the capital of Czechoslovakia in early 1945. During her time on the front she was in charge of various traffic regulation duties.

“I took care of traffic regulations on the road leading to the front lines where vehicles and troops were passing," she recalls. She remembers also being afraid of the intense fighting going on around her at the time, especially in Western Ukraine where the fighting was very hard. "We fought for the unity of the Ukraine, and what is happening now is incomprehensible," she says sharply when asked about the current situation in Ukraine. "It is bad for everyone."

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Women of the Red Army 14
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1925, 90 year-old Nina has two children, five grand children, and 5 great grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in 1943 on the 4th Ukrainian front. At 16 years-old Nina was incorporated into a battalion following the army’s move Westward towards Prague, where she took part in the battle to retake the capital of Czechoslovakia in early 1945. During her time on the front she was in charge of various traffic regulation duties.

“I took care of traffic regulations on the road leading to the front lines where vehicles and troops were passing," she recalls. She remembers also being afraid of the intense fighting going on around her at the time, especially in Western Ukraine where the fighting was very hard. "We fought for the unity of the Ukraine, and what is happening now is incomprehensible," she says sharply when asked about the current situation in Ukraine. "It is bad for everyone."

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Women of the Red Army 15
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1920, 94 year-old Nagaieva has one child, two grand children, and three great grand children. Nagaieva was drafted into the Red Army and sent to the front lines near Kursk where the Soviets were battling the German army in 1943. She contributed to the war effort as a dentist, following the Soviet army’s advance through Ukraine, Eastern Europe and finally into Germany where she took part of the fall of the Reichstadt in late April 1945.

When asked how she felt about the final victory on May 9th 1945, she smiles and says, “This May 9th, I had the impression of being 19 years-old again."

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Women of the Red Army 16
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1920, 94 year-old Nagaieva has one child, two grand children, and three great grand children. Nagaieva was drafted into the Red Army and sent to the front lines near Kursk where the Soviets were battling the German army in 1943. She contributed to the war effort as a dentist, following the Soviet army’s advance through Ukraine, Eastern Europe and finally into Germany where she took part of the fall of the Reichstadt in late April 1945.

When asked how she felt about the final victory on May 9th 1945, she smiles and says, “This May 9th, I had the impression of being 19 years-old again."

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Women of the Red Army 17
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1924, 90 year-old Maria was a volunteer nurse, treating Red Army soldiers on the front lines.

“When I learned about the German invasion of my country in 1941, I volunteered as a nurse in the 847th infantry regiment. Soon after joining the regiment, the entire unit was ordered to the front lines at Lipetsk in central Russia," she explains.

During the trip the regiment was attacked many times by German airplanes. Though out 1942 and 1943, she fought with the regiment into Ukraine and took part in the liberation of Kharkov, Kiev and Lviv. She continued her progress with the regiment into Germany in 1945 before being ordered towards Czechoslovakia to take part in the battle of Prague in early 1945.

“I have saved many lives as a nurse, but I was myself wounded twice," explains the veteran. “What is the hardest for me, is all the people I could not save. But I am very proud of my service to my country, defending it.”

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Women of the Red Army 18
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

Born in 1924, 90 year-old Maria was a volunteer nurse, treating Red Army soldiers on the front lines.

“When I learned about the German invasion of my country in 1941, I volunteered as a nurse in the 847th infantry regiment. Soon after joining the regiment, the entire unit was ordered to the front lines at Lipetsk in central Russia," she explains.

During the trip the regiment was attacked many times by German airplanes. Though out 1942 and 1943, she fought with the regiment into Ukraine and took part in the liberation of Kharkov, Kiev and Lviv. She continued her progress with the regiment into Germany in 1945 before being ordered towards Czechoslovakia to take part in the battle of Prague in early 1945.

“I have saved many lives as a nurse, but I was myself wounded twice," explains the veteran. “What is the hardest for me, is all the people I could not save. But I am very proud of my service to my country, defending it.”

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Women of the Red Army 12
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 May 2015

Born in 1927, 88 year-old Ivannikova has five children, 12 grand children, and 8 great grand children. During the war she was a military train conductor in Saratov in South East Russia.

“I was in a technical high school to learn how to drive trains when the war began," she remembers. She started to drive military trains in 1943. “Most of the time we would transport ammunitions to the front lines. But sometimes, we did not know what the cargo contained, as it was secret."

Though German planes never attacked her train, she remembers being scared all the time. “I used to have nightmares each night,” she recalls. She also remembers the day of victory. She cried a lot remembering the death of so many people, but said, “it was a great day for me, because we won, and the war was finally over.”

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Nepal portfolio final 18
Bhaktapur
By Taylor Weidman
02 May 2015

Nepali women react to a call from their neighbor as they work to clear rubble from their home in Bhaktapur, Nepal on May 2, 2015. On April 25, 2015, Nepal suffered a magnitude 7.8 earthquake killing over 6,000 people and injuring thousands more.

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Sum Dany 01
Phnom Penh
By Ana Salvá
20 Apr 2015

Sum Dany is part of a three-woman team developing a first-of-its-kind mobile application to raise awareness and report cases of domestic abuse in Cambodia.

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Sum Dany 02
Phnom Penh
By Ana Salvá
20 Apr 2015

Sum Dany and Phat Sreytouch talk at a conference dedicated to women's rights and social media about their application. The two are part of a three-woman team developing a first-of-its-kind mobile application to raise awareness and report cases of domestic abuse in Cambodia.

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User Testing
Phnom Penh
By Ana Salvá
20 Apr 2015

Phat Sreytouch conducts a user test on an application she and two other women are developing, dedicated to improving the social situation of women in her country.

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Europe-bound Migrants Held in Libyan ...
Misrata
By Mohamed Lagha
20 Apr 2015

Misrata, Libya
April 21, 2015

Dozens of men, women and children are held in deplorable conditions in a jail in Misrata, controlled by the security forces loyal to the Islamist Libyan government in Tripoli. The detainees who appear in this video, most of whom come from east African countries, were caught in Libya on their way to try to reach Europe. An office that controls immigration is deporting the detainees to their countries through their countries’ embassies in Tunisia. However, Somalian and Eritrean detainees cannot return because of the instability plaguing their countries. Some of them have been in this prison for five months.

An interviewed female detainee from Eritrea, who introduced herself as Yodit, said that she was arrested with her cousin and other immigrants in the Libyan desert as they were heading to Europe. The group had started their clandestine journey in Khartoum, Sudan. Yodit said that they spent one month on the road before being arrested. By the time of the interview, she had spent two weeks in custody and was worried that her family back home might think that she was dead. The woman, who appears to be in her twenties, also complained that the detention center is overcrowded and lacks proper ventilation.

Various shots of detainees.

TRANSCRIPT
Soundbite (Arabic/English, Woman) Yodit, Female Eritrean detainee

00:48 – 04:14

"Q: What is your name? [Arabic]

A: What? [Arabic]

Q: Your name. [Arabic]

A: Yodit.

Q: How long have you been here?

A: Just one week.

Q: One week?

A: Yeah.

Q: Where are you from?

A: From Eritrea.

Q: You came by… the desert?

A: Yeah, the desert.

Q: How exactly? Through which country?

A: By the Khartoum to the Libya desert. [UNINTELLIGIBLE] When [we] came here, they catch us.

Q: Where?

A: In the desert of Libya.

Q: Where?

A: In Libya, but the place exactly, what it’s called…. I don’t know.

Q: In the desert, or a gate?

A: Desert, desert.

Q: The desert?

A: Yeah.

Q: Is it near from here?

A: I think [it is] far.

Q: One hour? Two hours? How much time?

A: Four hours from here.

Q: And then what are you doing here? What did they tell you?

A: We want to travel to Europe. So they catch us, they arrest us… even before here, just one week another place, the place which kept us. We came also here one week. That means two weeks under arrest. So they… you see they are stand up all night here. The [UNINTELLIGIBLE] is bad It smells bad all night. There is no air. The place is bad, really. [UNINTELLIGIBLE]The condition is bad, seriously.

Q: What did they tell you? Did they tell you that they are going out? Did they call your embassy?

A: No. No phone. We families don’t know where we are.

Q: They didn’t call your families?

A: Yeah. Because we don’t have a phone here. So no one knows where they are. I don’t know. Maybe our families they think [we] die or something.

Q: You are here alone? You don’t have any family here?

A: She’s my cousin. So we are two.

Q: Now you are here for one week.

A: Here. But another place also one week. The way…. but one month is in the way in the desert. We are hungry, there is no water, there is no anything. We were about to die. But that is good, they save us and keep us here. But I don’t know [UNINTELLIGIBLE] about time I don’t know anything.

Q: Thank you.

A: You’re welcome. Thank you, too.”

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Animation 04
Tbong Khmum
By Ana Salvá
08 Apr 2015

The mobile app uses simple animations to illustrate situations in the everyday lives of women.