Thumb sm
Junk Eaters 14
Manila, Philippines
By Javier Triana
05 Nov 2014

Jessica Padilla (R) and her cousin fill plastic bags with 'pagpag' they'll later sell at the Baseco Market, Manila.

Thumb sm
Junk Eaters 15
Manila, Philippines
By Javier Triana
05 Nov 2014

Jessica Padilla (R) and her cousin fill plastic bags with 'pagpag' they'll later sell at the Baseco Market, Manila.

Thumb sm
Junk Eaters 18
Manila, Philippines
By Javier Triana
05 Nov 2014

Ezequiel and Jessica Padilla at their 'pagpag' stall in the Baseco slum market, Manila.

Thumb sm
Junk Eaters 19
Manila, Philippines
By Javier Triana
05 Nov 2014

Ezequiel and Jessica Padilla at their 'pagpag' stall in the Baseco slum market, Manila.

Thumb sm
Junk Eaters 20
Manila, Philippines
By Javier Triana
05 Nov 2014

Ezequiel Padilla grabs a bag filled with 'pagpag' at his stall in the Baseco slum market, Manila.

Thumb sm
Mentally Disabled and Chained in Gaza
Beit Hanoun
By Sanaa Kamal
21 Oct 2014

October 22, 2014
Beit Hanoun, Gaza Strip

21-year-old Jamil Attia Za’anin is one of thousands of Gazans who’s home was destroyed in the 2014 summer war with Israel. However, Jamil’s case is particularly bad as he suffers from a neurological disorder that has left him severely mentally disabled. Jamil now lives in a shack with his family with no access to proper healthcare. In fact, his disability itself is symptomatic of the living conditions in Gaza, as it is a result of substandard healthcare in the coastal enclave.

Jamil now spends his days chained in front of his temporary home because there is nowhere for him to go and his family fears he may run away. His younger brother Mohammad is also mentally disabled, albeit to less severe degree. The family’s situation is particularly desperate as their father Attaya is too old to work. Left with no working age males in the family, they are forced to rely on food handouts from the United Nations. The family now spends their days salvaging the rubble from their destroyed home, struggling to find enough money to eat, and trying to keep their two disabled boys safe and healthy.

Thumb sm
Handicapped in the rubble of gaza 21
Gaza
By Sanaa Kamal
21 Oct 2014

October 22, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Jamil Attia Za'anin with his mother Donia Za'anin. Jamil, 21, developed a spinal condition 16 years ago when he was just a child. Poor healthcare infrastructure in Gaza meant that doctors could not properly treat Jamil, so the disease spread to his brain, leaving him handicapped. Jamil lives with his ten family members in a shack in the town of Beit Hanoun in the north of the Gaza Strip. He has a younger brother Mohammed, 19, who is also handicapped and the family's situation was made even worse after their house was destroyed in the recent war with Israel.

Thumb sm
Evicted: Ivory Coast Mega Highway Dis...
Abidjan
By Patrick
20 Oct 2014

After more than a decade of violence and political unrest, Ivory Coast is experiencing important investments from foreign nations in an attempt to encourage economic growth in the country. But while government projects will allegedly benefit the population, some people suffer from evictions that are pushing many Ivoirians from their homes to make room for high-visibility infrastructure projects.

In October, the country announced a $114 million loan from the Export-Import Bank of China at two-percent interest over 20 years to finance a six-lane motorway construction linking Abidjan to the historical city of Grand-Bassam, 30 km to the east.

Gonzagueville belongs to the Port Bouet commune, in the outskirts of the capital. All of the buildings in the suburb of Abidjan have been demolished to make way for the construction of the Abidjan-Grand Bassam motorway.

According to witnesses, police officers arrived early in the morning in the southern coastal suburb of Gonzagueville and burned down several tents, threatening residents and telling them to leave the premises immediately. “Some of us were woken up at 5 A.M,” they say, “and told we had one hour to leave.”

Residents say the government didn't set an official date for them to leave by. They proposed to start next summer to avoid disrupting the school year, but the government refused.
Several miles of houses in Gonzagueville, among other areas, were taken down as part of a $114 million project aimed at developing the tourist sector along Ivory Coast's south coast and help ease congestion in the capital Abidjan.

The Ivoirian government has planned to pay $6.5 million in compensations to relocate the people living in these areas. However many say they haven’t received the money they were promised and are living among the debris of what used to be their homes.

Isaac is a traditional healer. He has no place to go and is staying with a friend. He hasn't been able to work ever since he was evicted due to the lack of space at his friend’s place.

Another resident evicted, Viviane is moving back to her home country, Ghana. She says she hasn't received any compensation. “And even if I did, it would not be enough to buy a new home.”

People claim that residents living in shanties and tents across the coastline in Gonzagueville are constantly threatened by local authorities to leave the area. Those lucky enough move in with friends, but most of those displaced by the demolitions have no place to go and are forgotten by local authorities.

Assouan Carine says that she and her mother were living in a tent with six more families until local authorities burned it down.

Before being evicted, residents remove literally everything from their homes, including the roof, to use it in their future houses. However, several families have no place to go and are surviving among debris in unhealthy environments. Improvised camps can be found across the coastline in Gonzagueville, often hosting multiple families, who struggle to have access to the most basic needs, like clean water.

Most children can't go back to school and have to stay home in the rubble of their former township with their families and help search for steel and re-sellable metal in abandoned houses.

Hotels, churches and gas stations were also taken down. Some crosses are set by residents in the sand across the coastline to mark the former emplacement of churches.

Many other projects are being undertaken by the government – including roads, housing and infrastructure upgrades - to boost the already high production of rubber and cocoa. Ivory Coast is the largest economy in the West African Economic and Monetary Union, and its economic capital Abidjan is known as Western Africa's Paris.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 6
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Rashid Miah cut down all of the trees around his house on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Having already lost his house to the river, Mr. Miah is salvaging his trees in order to sell them and save enough money to move to Dhaka.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 8
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rubel stands in front of his uprooted coconut trees on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. After loosing his cow to river bank erosion, these coconut trees were his last source of livelihood. However, these trees have now also fallen victim to the river.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 12
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rabeya Khatun mourns her lost husband and son on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Her husband and son lost their lives when their house was swallowed by the river as they slept. Rabeya was at her mother's house when the incident occurred and thus survived.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Ikram stands in front of the Meghna river, near Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. He has seen his neighbors migrating and even dying because of water related disasters. Despite strong signals that it is best to leave the area, he does not know what to do because his land is all he has.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 2
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
03 Oct 2014

Sadarghat Launch Terminal, situated on the bank of the river Buriganga in Dhaka, is one of the busiest places in Bangladesh. Most people migrating from the countryside pass through this port to migrate to Dhaka. Many of those migrating are climate refugees.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Sep 2014

Jogodish Borua, 65, lost his land and his house to river erosion.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Sep 2014

Abdul Aziz, who lost his home to erosion along the banks of the river, takes a bath in the Padma.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Sep 2014

A fisherman and a local villager cross paths on the banks of the river Padma.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 20
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Sep 2014

The situation is especially severe for children. A woman and child have been displaced along with other members of their neighborhood who also lost their homes.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 06
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Sep 2014

A man walks through the ruins of a house damaged by river erosion.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Sep 2014

A boy plays on the banks of the river Padma in a spot where there once sat family homes.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 4
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Shahjahan transports tin sheets and other materials from his house. Some families actually migrate before disaster strikes so they do not lose all of their belongings in an impending disaster. Mohammad deconstructed his entire house and moved it elsewhere before it was destroyed by the water.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 5
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Mamun stands over his submerged house in the Padma River in Dohar, Dhaka. Mr. Mamun's house was swallowed by the Padma after river bank erosion resulted in a land implosion.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 7
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Romjal Ali takes a selfie with his destroyed house. Mr. Ali's house was destroyed by the eroding river bank. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 9
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Rabeya Begum stands over the roof of her house which she salvaged after it was destroyed by river bank erosion. She is going to use the salvaged materials to build her new home. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Khadija Akhter was only able to save this cabinet and some bricks from her house after river bank erosion resulted in her house being destroyed and submerged. Dohar, Dhaka.

Thumb sm
Fleeing Nature 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Hashmot Ali's house sits tilted and half submerged in the Padma river after the bank on which his house was built gave way. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 19
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
24 Aug 2014

People who lost their homes set up makeshift shelters along the river.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
24 Aug 2014

Rising water levels on the river Padma in Bangladesh threaten homes and put inhabitants of the river basin at risk.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 04
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
24 Aug 2014

When the Padma river rises, erosion becomes a serious problem for the community living on the river. At the same time, waste littering the earth pollutes the water.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
24 Aug 2014

Houses sit near the banks of the river Padma in Bangladesh.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 17
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
24 Aug 2014

Flooding and erosion along the Padma river in Bangladesh has resulted in many people losing their homes and their land.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
24 Aug 2014

People are sometimes forces to move their houses to another place out of the path of river erosion.

Thumb sm
Climate change bangladesh 18
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
24 Aug 2014

A family made homeless by erosion and flooding along the Padma River dry cloth on the riverbank.

Thumb sm
Cameroon Gold Mining 04
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Artisanal mining in the village of Bunduru Foro is done with rudimentary tools as tin bowls, plastic buckets, showels, and simple sieves.

Thumb sm
Cameroon Gold Mining 03
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The village of Burundu Foro was built in order to access the mineral rich soil close to the border with the Central African Republic.

Thumb sm
Cameroon Gold Mining 05
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The village of Burundu Foro was built in order to access the mineral rich soil close to the border with the Central African Republic. Many children regularly fail to attend school in order to support join their families from a very young age working in the mines. 18-year-old Pier sold a gram of gold for 10,000 XAF. He might get a better price (up to 14,000) but doesn't want to wait, he said.

Thumb sm
Cameroon's Informal Mines 07
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Artisanal mining in the village of Burundu Foro is done with rudimentary tools as tin bowls, plastic buckets, showels, and simple sieves. Familiy members organize themselves throughout various stations of digging and washing the soil. The physically stronger male members of the community dig up the mineral rich soil in unsecured quarries dozens of meters below the surface.

Thumb sm
Cameroon Gold Mining 09
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Only a few minutes away of the small mining Village of Burundu Foro a Chinese Company (not wanting to be named) started a semi-industrial mine. They praise themselves for not employing children as compared to the artisanal mines in the region. Jean Pierre Ngandu, Chief of Burundu Foro meanwhile criticized their illegal acquisition of the mining ground.
According to the law about 30 percent of the revenue of exporting gold and diamonds should be paid in taxes. But even government officials operating in the mining sector confirmed that theory and praxis are poles apart.