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Trash Collectors
Manila
By Ralf Falbe
13 Jun 2016

Men carry bags of trash along the shoreline of Manila Bay, Philippines

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Fishermen
Roxas
By Ralf Falbe
02 Jun 2016

Fishermen with their raft passing the river in Roxas, Panay, Philippines.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are carrying freshly cut grass to feed the animals. The embankment is too steep and too intricate to be worked with mowers and cars. Even the donkeys wait for their burden on the top of the slope; women have to cut the grass by hand and carry it to the top themselves. Some, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. Strings of fluffy wool slide between their fingers and obediently lie down on swiftly turned spools, which are not unlike integral parts of their hands.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. She constantly spins wool, whenever her hands are free.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) is walking back to the village with a donkey loaded with freshly cut weed. She constantly spins wool, whenever her hands are free.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. Strings of fluffy wool slide between their fingers and obediently lie down on swiftly turned spools, which are not unlike integral parts of their hands.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. Strings of fluffy wool slide between their fingers and obediently lie down on swiftly turned spools, which are not unlike integral parts of their hands.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50)is walking back to the village with the donkey loaded with freshly cut weed.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is feeding her animals with freshly cut weed, Salasaca, Ecuador.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and a kitten in her land, Salasaca, Ecuador.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Tools that sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) use to cut, bind and carry the weed.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

one of the tools that sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) use to bind and carry the weed.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is picking the corn for dinner after feeding her animals in Salasaca, Ecuador.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are picking the corn for dinner after feeding her animals in Salasaca, Ecuador.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cooking dinner in the kitchen of her house, in Salasaca, Ecuador.

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Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) is walking down to the river to grass grass and spinning wooly ran on the way.

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Siquijor Island
Siquijor Island
By Ralf Falbe
05 Mar 2016

Paddling a Banca Boat at sunset, Siquijor Island, Philippines.

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Child Labour in Our World
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

It may sound like old news to some, but one of the scary realities of our world is that some of the biggest problems facing humanity occur without explosions, protests, or big news headlines. Often, those who suffer the most suffer in silence, far away from the eyes of news cameras and the international community.

Child Labour is one of those problems that passes largely unnoticed. All over the world, across cultural, social, and religious divides, child labour persists. Sometimes it occurs as the simple act of a well-intended parent taking their child to work in the farm fields by their side. Other times, it is malicious factory owners using children as cheap labour in their factory, where they are abused and underpaid.

What makes the issue more complicated is that child labour can occur in front of our eyes, without us noticing. Sometimes understanding child labour is understanding what is not visible to us. It is understanding that a working child is not attending school, that a working child is malnourished, and that a working child is physically and psychologically abused. The difference between a child helping their mother in the family shop and child exploitation could be the simple question of whether or not the child’s work is preventing them from attending school. The line can sometimes be fine and other times glaring.

At Transterra Media, our contributors have documented child labour around the world for years, from the brick factories of Bangladesh, to the garbage piles of Cambodia, and the car repair shops of Syria. Our contributors have shed a small amount of light on a massive issue that the world is still trying to address.

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Jamdani Weaving: Ancestral Tradition ...
South Rupshi, Bangladesh
By Karim + Jenny
29 May 2015

Text by Jenny Gustafsson and Photos by Karim Mostafa
At first glance, South Rupshi looks like any other village in the Bangladeshi countryside. Tea stalls line the roads, kids play in the mid-day heat. Rickshaw-drivers pedal their decorated bikes. But something sets it out from other villages. Everywhere, bundles of yarn are left to dry in the sun. People on their porches spin threads onto spindles, scarves flow in the wind. South Rupshi is the ancestral home of a proud tradition in Bangladesh: the age-old jamdani weaving.

These days the village weavers are busy. The demand for saris is growing, the handmade fabrics are sold to customers all over Bangladesh and India, and exported abroad. Last year, UNESCO declared jamdani an intangible cultural heritage, stating its importance in Bangladesh as “a symbol of identity, dignity and self-recognition”. But things used to be different. Only a few decades ago, traditional weaving was a forgotten heritage.

Until sari entrepreneur Monira Emdad came and brought it back to memory. “In the early 80’s when traveling in rural Bangladesh, I came across hand-woven saris, more beautiful than I had seen anywhere else. I started bringing them to Dhaka, selling them from a small tin shed,” she says. Her efforts started a jamdani revival, which has meant the craft is now passed down to the next generation – providing an alternative to a rural workforce which otherwise is pushed into low-paying jobs with unsafe conditions. “This is much better for us. We can stay in the village and work nearby our families. And it’s not dangerous, we only use our brains here,” says weaver Mohammad Azim.
FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Mauritian Youth
Port Louis
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
13 May 2015

This collection features photos of young people in Mauritius: in class at the university and organizing an awareness campaign on campus, and using computers at the inauguration of a community internet access point.

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Mauritius Youth 01
Port Louis
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A young person uses a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 02
Port Louis
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A man is helped to use a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 03
Port Louis
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A young person helps community members use a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.