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October 6th Protests 7
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

Thousands of protestors took to the street on October 6th not only to commemorate the war against Israel, but many were also calling for the ouster of General Sisi.

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October 6th Protests 4
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

The protestors flashed the '4' in solidarity with those killed during the Rabaa al Adeweya sit-in in August.

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October 6th Protests 6
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

Thousands of protestors march through downtown Cairo to commemorate the October 6th war and to protest against military rule.

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October 6th Protests 2
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
06 Oct 2013

Anti military rule protestors, many of them members of the Muslim Brotherhood, gather to march towards Cairo's Tahrir Square.

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October 6th Protests 5
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
06 Oct 2013

Protestors against military rule clash with security forces in Cairo's Dokki district. Heavy gunfire followed the use of tear gas, leading to the deaths of protestors.

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October 6th Protests 8
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
06 Oct 2013

Youth watch as security forces fire tear gas to disperse crowds.

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October 6th Protests 1
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
06 Oct 2013

Protestors in Cairo's Dokki district flee tear gas and birdshot fired by security forces.

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Commercial Port and Politics Clash in...
Sidon, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
05 Oct 2013

There is a new commercial port in construction in Saida, Lebanon. This port has affected the profits of local fishermen and the union they are in has different opinions of how to handle the situation, especially when it comes to the financial distribution of funds.

Photos and Text by Kaylyn Hlavaty

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Cabinet Office Clashes Cairo
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

Protesters start a fire during clashes with army soldiers at the cabinet near Tahrir Square in Cairo December 16, 2011. Stone-throwing demonstrators clashed with troops in central Cairo on Friday, witnesses said, in the worst violence since the start of Egypt's first free election in six decades. Al-Qasr Al-Aini Street, Cairo, Egypt. 16/12/201
By: Jeffrey Bright

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Inconvenient to all, West Bank Bedouins
West Bank, Israel
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements, approved by the last Israeli government even if they are considered illegal by International laws. Following the 1948 conflict, the majority of the Negev Bedouin were forcibly evicted from their ancestral lands in the Negev by the Israeli authorities. Clans from five of the Negev tribes subsequently moved to the West Bank and registered as refugees with UNRWA. Forced to abandon nomadism and become permanent, the Palestinian Bedouin living in the Jerusalem periphery are now in a very poor, dramatic and emergency situation. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.
But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" so-called Nuweimeh Plan, which seeks to solve the ‘Bedouin problem’ by relocating the approximately 2300 Bedouins of the E1-zone to a town named Nuweimeh near Jericho. The lands of Nuweimeh, however is unsuitable for the animals to graze, and in addition there is no job opportunities, which is why the Bedouins who already are settled there live almost solely on UN food parcels. By the other side, the Palestinian Authorities do not provide any significant support to these communities, which are considered as a second class population.

By: Giuliano Camarda

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A New Nakba for Syrian Palestinians
South Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
01 Oct 2013

Out of the 500,000 Palestinian refugees living in Syria, it is estimated that 56,000 have fled their homes because of the war, and taken refuge in Lebanon.

After Ahmed Jibril, leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), announced his support for the Syrian regime, and the Free Syrian army entered the Palestinian refugee camp, Yarmouk, in an angry reaction to Jibril’s statement, 85 percent of the camp’s inhabitants abandoned their homes and took refuge in Bourj el-barajneh Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon.

These refugees feel a nostalgia for their home in Yarmouk, Syria, similar to the one felt for a forbidden Palestine after the 1948, and 1967 Arab-Israeli wars. The Palestinian refugees in Syria were part of the community with good jobs and homes, unlike the refugees in Lebanon who are restricted in terms of professions and live in an environment where the water is not clean and there is a daily 18 hour power cut.

“Oh, Yaramouk was not like Bourj” moans Mohammed, “in Syria the water is clean and pure, you can drink it.” The belief in the ‘right of return’ to Palestine – a principle of International Law - has been the cornerstone of the Palestinian struggle since the creation of Israel in 1948. However, for those Palestinian-Syrians – victims of a second displacement - there is an emerging narrative whose axis is shifting from Palestine to Yaramouk Camp, or wherever they once lived. Accordingly, the ‘right of return’ the recurring motif of the Palestinian narrative is changing its meaning in the new Middle East.

The Syrian Civil War has paved the way for a new ‘Nakba’; a Nakba leading to the return to an imagined Palestine in Syria.

Collette Hogg lives and has spent the last 11 months in Palestinian Refugee camp Bourj el-barajneh in Lebanon.

Article by Collette Hogg
Photographs by Collette Hogg

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Story of Taloozy 2
South Beirut, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
01 Oct 2013

Taloozy holds up a photo of his brother who died in clashes in Yaramouk.

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Story of Taloozy 1
South Beirut, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
01 Oct 2013

Mohammed explains what is written on the blackboard.

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Zeyad, instant smile and a passion fo...
Ar Raqqa, syria
By Hamza Abozeid
01 Oct 2013

Zeyad is an engineering student who couldn't continue his study because of the events in the country and chose to volunteer with the Ahrar Al Sham Islamic movement, he is aiming to continue his education and gain his degree in engineering after the war ends, only God knows when!

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One day it was a class room!
Ar Raqqa, syria
By Hamza Abozeid
01 Oct 2013

The first lesson in the reading class is:
Dad died, mum died, Bassem died, Rabab died.

أول درس في كتاب القراءة : مات بابا ماتت ماما مات باسم ماتت رباب

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One of the headquarters of the politi...
Ar Raqqa, syria
By Hamza Abozeid
01 Oct 2013

The political security was one of the most terrible bodies of the regime where lots of torture used to take place.

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School book cover
Ar Raqqa, syria
By Hamza Abozeid
01 Oct 2013

The photo is taken for a school book cover in the pile of one of the bombed schools in Ar Raqqah

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School books from the pile
Ar Raqqa, syria
By Hamza Abozeid
01 Oct 2013

Photo is taken at one of the bombed schools in Ar Raqqah.

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School remnants
Ar Raqqa, syria
By Hamza Abozeid
01 Oct 2013

The school was destroyed, but the children learned a lesson; to live with dignity and stand for truth, photo is taken at on of the bombed schools in Ar Raqqah.

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School yard
Ar Raqqa, syria
By Hamza Abozeid
01 Oct 2013

One of the bombed schools in Ar Raqqah, the city has several bombed schools, one of them was bombed two days before taking this photo, 15 civilians were killed, 10 boy, 3 girls, an office boy and another civilian who was passing by.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 1
Sarajevo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

War damages in Bosnia & Herzegovina’s capital Sarajevo have mostly been disappeared during the past decade. On August 25th, 1992, due to heavy shelling of the city, the Vijećnica, Sarajevo’s National Library and nearly all of its books burst up in flames. In 2013 the outside restoration has been completed and re-opening is scheduled for 2014.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 2
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Stanusic from Bosnia & Herzegovina Mine Action Center (BHMAC) is clearing in an area near Visoko. Members of the mine squad work alone and scan about five square meters with a metal detector every 30 minutes. Since 1995 nearly 50 mine clearance personnel have been killed, 115 have been seriously wounded

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 3
Sarajevo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Since the outbreak of Bosnia’s three-year war in 1992 nearly 10.000 people have either been killed or badly injured in landmine incidents all over the country.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 4
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Adila Bijelic (62) and her family have been seriously affected by Bosnia’s landmine situation in multiple tragedies. Her husband Fehim got killed by a landmine in 1996. In another incident in late 2012 her son Ibrahim was badly injured while her 6-year-old grandson Tarik was fatally wounded and died in the arms of his father.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 5
Zivinice, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ajka Ibrahimovic (50) was badly injured during an explosion ordnance (UXO) incident in 1995. Until today Ajka has shrapnel pieces inside her body and lungs. Removing them in an operation would be too dangerous. A shrapnel inside her lung can be seen as a white point on this x-ray.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 6
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Nearly 1.250 square kilometers of Bosnia – about 2,5 % of its total land mass – are still profoundly mined. Big vegetation is one of the biggest problems in the act of demining along with the fact that a lot of the soil is contaminated with metal from bullets, cartridge, fragments, shrapnel, barbwire and other metal garbage. Due to safety reasons a deminer has to check every signal, even the smallest, until a depth of 20cm. This makes the job of clearing a mined area slower and more dangerous.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 7
Doboj, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Goranović (40), far right, stepped on a landmine while serving in the army of Republika Srpske in 1992 and suffered a below-knee amputation of his right leg. After the end of the war Goran didn’t receive any financial or psychological support. He is living with his family in a very remote area in Doboj region, Republika Srpska. In 2002 Zoran Panic (far left), who is working for the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) in Doboj, learned about his case and the initiative started to support Goran with a cultivator for agricultural use as well as weekly visits. Here the two are accompanied by Ramiz Bećirović from LSI Tuzla.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 8
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Warning sign at the entrance of a wood land near Olovo.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 9
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ibrahim Bijelic (38) has been badly injured during a landmine incident in late 2012 when the family was collecting firewood in the nearby forest. His 6-year old son Tarik has been fatally wounded in the same incident and died in the arms of his father. Like for many other villagers in such a remote area the only possible way for the Bijelic family to make a living is by seling collected firewood from the forests. Ibrahim and his family have not been supported by the government since the incident. They are in need of financial and psychological support. The Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) supports the family with regular visits and provided an agricultural cultivator so that Ibrahim is able to earn some money.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 11
Doboj region, bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Since she was a little girl collecting firewood has always been essential to Razija Aljić (54). This made her make a living and to weather long and cold winters in remote Bosnian landside.

After the war, following the return to their pre-war house in the village of Lukavica Rijeka in Doboj municipality, the circumstance got very wicked and the family’s tragedy took its course:

In 1996 Razija has lost her 19-year old son Nedzad in a landmine incident near their house. Only two years later her husband got killed in another explosion. In summer 2011 Razija’s second son Yusuf and his brother-in-law were fatally wounded by a landmine explosion and died in the forests. Ruzmir (19) is Razija’s only remaining son.

During the interview he points out that in order to support a living for his family he will soon go back to the forests.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 12
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Stanusic from Bosnia & Herzegovina Mine Action Center (BHMAC) is clearing an area near Visoko. Members of the mine squad work alone and scan about five square meters with a metal detector every 30 minutes. Since 1995 nearly 50 mine clearance personnel have been killed, 115 have been seriously wounded.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 13
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Deminers from BH MAC have successfully cleared a small area near Visoko and withdrawn the security tapes. (from left to right: BH MAC inspector Sinisa, team leader Marko, deminer Nebojsa, operative officer Savo)

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 14
Zivinice, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ajka Ibrahimovic didn’t receive any governmental support since the tragic events in 1995. Back ten,she and her 5-year old son Aldin were seriously wounded due to the explosion of unexploded ordnance (UXO). The incident killed two women and seven children including Ajkas nephew. Until today Ajka has shrapnel pieces inside her body and lungs. Removing them in an operation would be too dangerous.

LSI has supported her with the allocation of a greenhouse. Ajka is now successfully growing vegetables and selling them to neighbors in her hometown Zivinice.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 16
Zivinice, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ajka Ibrahimovic is proudly showing the harvest of her greenhouse. Since the LSI supported her with the allocation of a greenhouse in 2011 she is successfully earning money out of growing vegetables.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 17
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ibrahim Bijelic (38) showing his agricultural cultivator.Itwhich has been provided by the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) with financial support of UNDP and Norwegian Aid.