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Veterans Protecting Protesters in Mai...
kiev,ukraine
By lordcob
12 Dec 2013

A team of Afghanistan's vetaran sing the Ukrainian National anthem, which is played time to time on the main stage of Maidan Square.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Ukrainian Protests 11
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

Inside of the tent of the anti-government protesters. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 5
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

A camp of the anti-government protesters in the morning after night snowfall.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 10
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

Inside the tent of the anti-government protesters. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 9
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

Activist helping the medical service inside of tent of the anti-government protesters. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukraine Protests 8
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

Activist inside of the tent of the anti-government protesters warming up cream which is suppose to be used for medical reasons. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 4
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

A camp of the anti-government protesters at Plac Svobody called Lviv Euromaidan. Place is occupied by local students who are against the government policy on EU access.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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After the Spring: Libya Beyond the He...
Libya
By Transterra Editor
06 Dec 2013

As news of violent militias, unchecked powers, rebel uprisings and high profile kidnappings fill the pages, turmoil and discontent fill many minds. Though, it is easy to get caught up in the loudest elements of regime change. We often forget that Libya, is home to many people, many of whom are trying to rebuild and grow after years of hardship.

As this fledgling democracy finds its feet, Libyans enjoy the freedom of daily life. Despite all the hardship Libyans struggle with due to the conflict, there is room for new opportunities because of the war. Booming after the controlling government of the Gadhafi era, many of the spheres he regulated are now wide open. News outlets in Libya expanded from a handful of censored papers to hundreds of newspapers, radio shows, and cable channels. Many presume that the countries new constitution will hold greater rights for women and minorities. Intrepid women have taken to running for elected office and opening small businesses. Libyans feel liberated and can indulge in pastimes banned under the strict Gaddafi regime such as boxing and several media outlets have launched on account of the new freedom of press. Much has changed for the better, shelled stores have been rebuilt and are back in business and the fragile government grows more cohesive every day.

After a year of civil war, life has begun to move beyond the revolution. Babies are birthed every day into the new fledgling country, marriages officiated and soldiers repatriated. While the violence in Libya has diminished allowing room for regrowth, sporadic flares of conflict take the main stage while a critical part of the story of the revolution is ignored. Libya, now more than ever, isn’t simply violent rebels in a dusty desert depicted in western media.

Students have returned to class working through the summer to make up time lost and progress with their degrees. Student government, which was also banned under the previous government is now a popular club as Libyans; who haven’t voted in 42 years exercise their rights regularly. Often voting on even the smallest things.

Though some things will never change in this desert country. The beach is still a popular destination, with families filing the sand every evening. Amusement parks are now open, after crews were quickly dispatched to fix the damage and cover the bullet holes.

The Libyan people are experiencing a whole range of emotions that go beyond violence and suffering. Libya’s rehabilitation efforts as a country move slowly though they are much more powerful and important than the dissonance among few and with that, healing can begin.

Rebirth has come to the country, and with that the brave can find forgiveness among neighbors and a country can find peace.

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Ukrainian Protests 3
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
05 Dec 2013

A camp of the anti-government protesters in the morning after night snowfall.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 1
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
05 Dec 2013

Protesters gather around a brazier at Plac Svobody (Euromaidan Lviv) next to the Staue of T. Schewtschenko.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 6
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
05 Dec 2013

Inside the tent of the anti-government protesters. The camp funcitons 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 2
Ukraine,Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
05 Dec 2013

Crowd gathered at Plac Svobody (Euromaidan Lviv) during anti-government protests.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 14
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
05 Dec 2013

Inside the tent of the anti-government protesters. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukraine Protests 12
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
05 Dec 2013

Inside the tent of the anti-goverment protesters. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 16
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
04 Dec 2013

A couple during anti-government parade at Plac Svobody.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 15
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
04 Dec 2013

Young Ukrainians decorate their cars with flags of Ukraine and European union before a parade of cars with anti-govenment protesters at Plac Svobody.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 19
Ukraine, lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
04 Dec 2013

Evening gathering of protesters at Plac Svobody.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 17
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
04 Dec 2013

Crowd gathered at Plac Svobody (Euromaidan Lviv) during anti-government protests.
Lviv, Ukraine.

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Ukrainian Protests 20
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
03 Dec 2013

Evening gathering of protesters at Plac Svobody. Lviv, Ukraine.

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The Robot That Will Save Syrians from...
Kilis, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

Working in a nondescript machine shop on the outskirts of Kilis, Turkey, a hacker and an engineer duo are putting the finishing touches on the robotic arms of a largely self-funded robot that will rescue casualties of sniper attacks without putting further lives at risk who try to rescue the victims.

The arms will be attached to a modified armoured bulldozer, and controlled using a sophisticated remote system with a 50 kilometre range. The team have been in discussion with Doctors Without Borders (MSF), who have expressed interest in the project and have also been approached by Google Ideas to speak about their work.

With the all important arms now nearing completion, the duo are confident they will be able to get the arms over the Syrian border for final assembly within weeks.

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Documentaries
Worldwide
By Mais Istanbuli
25 Nov 2013

TRANSTERRA is becoming more than just a marketplace where producers can showcase and sell their documentaries. We are a resource for archive footage, and a community that provides collaboration opportunities.

The documentaries shown here are part of TRANSTERRA's greater catalog of options. Full-length screenings are available for most, and you can access these by sending an e-mail request to [email protected].

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Explosion near the Iranian Embassy in...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
19 Nov 2013

There were at least 20 dead, after an explosion occurred near a building belonging to the Iranian Embassy in the southern suburbs of the Lebanese capital of Beirut, this morning, Tuesday, 19-11-2013

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Twin explosions in Beirut Near Irania...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
17 Nov 2013

At least 23 people were killed and more than 145 injured in two explosions that ripped through Beirut's neighborhood of Bir Hassan, near the Iranian embassy. The cultural attaché for the Iranian embassy, Sheikh Ibrahim Ansari, was among those killed. Abdullah Azzam Brigades, an al-Qaeda-linked group, has claimed responsibility for the attack.

Photos by Hussein Baydoun

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Students Clash with Police in Bulgaria
Sofia,Bulgaria
By Nohad Ghayad
13 Nov 2013

Protesters scuffle with police during a demonstration near the parliament in central Sofia November 12, 2013. Several hundred students and anti-government protesters surrounded the parliament in the Bulgarian capital on Tuesday demanding the resignation of the Socialist-led government.

Photos and Text by Georgi Kozhuharov

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Funeral for Islamic Jihad Militant in...
Beit Liqya, Palestinian territories
By Transterra Editor
23 Oct 2013

Thousands filled the streets of the village of Beit Liqya, mourning the death of Islamic Jihad militant Muhammad Assi ,28, who was shot dead on Wednesday by Israeli forces near Ramallah. At the funeral, Assi was wrapped in Palestinian Islamic Jihad flags. Scores of cars followed the procession and thousands carried the body while chanting slogans calling for revenge and resistance against Israel's occupation. Islamic Jihad did confirm Assi was one of its militants. The Israeli army confirmed the incident and claimed Assi was responsible for the Tel Aviv bus bombing in November 2012 that wounded 29 people.

Photos and Text by Giuliano Camarda

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The Antechamber of Life
Lebanon Arsal
By Transterra Editor
22 Oct 2013

Arsal, a Lebanese border city with Syria, is a haven for the more than 12,000 Syrians who fled the fighting of the region of Qalamoun recently. Inside a building under construction in the small city, which today hosts more Syrians than Lebanese, the Union of Syrian Organizations of Medical Aid (UOSSM) organizes a formation on war medicine for 32 Syrian doctors and nurses every month.

In October, most of the trainees were originated from Qusayr, Syria, where they had to treat patients in clandestine clinics, hidden from the eyes of the Syrian authorities. Some were imprisoned and others tortured because they were treating civilians in secret. When the city was taken by the Syrian regime in summer 2013, they had to flee to Arsal, where they built a hospital inside of a mosque. There, they began to cure the injured from Qusayr, before being overwhelmed by the injured from the region of Qalamoun, the new epicentre of the Syrian civil war.

Between the 28th of November and the 3rd of December, half of the doctors and nurses who attended the formation were coming from Qalamoun. Some had lost their parents, other their children. But all were determined to learn the vital techniques to cure in the conditions of violence and shortage. Once trained and back in Syria, they will reproduce what they learned and train the rare doctors and nurses who still treat civilians among the ruins of Syria.

In the midst of a war where humanitarian right is seldom respected and where doctors are considered as targets by the Syrian regime, Raphaël Pitti, a former French war doctor and founder of the UOSSM, decided to organize formations of war medicine in Turkey, Syria and Lebanon, to teach to local doctors how to save lives in conditions of war. Today, 300 doctors and 350 nurses have been trained by the UOSSM. In the rebel areas of Syria, where international NGOs have no access, they remain the only people who can still save lives... at the risk of their own.

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The Basij in Iran
Iran
By Transterra Editor
21 Oct 2013

Basij is a voluntary organization in Iran with a focus on military, education and other socio-economic projects. It is affiliated with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards and is one of the public branches of this organization. Basij has millions of members; many of these members are women of different ages. It deals with and executes a lot of projects that are related to construction, and cultural and economical activities throughout the country. Many of these projects include helping the poor in deprived regions of the country, organizing religious teaching, publishing different books and magazines that have Islamic content, arranging different educational courses for the illiterate; to educate them in the fields of science and train them for arranging festivals, seminars, and plays. Basij also plays a role in holding military training that take place in Tehran and other regions of Iran. These trainings are annual and take place at the same time. This collection documents the women members of Basij participating in the training. Women may join the Basij for religious reasons or in order to have access to more benefits through the Basij and be among other women. In this training, the women learned how to shoot, what to do in the event of an explosion or a hypothetical enemy attack, and how to to deal with street outrage and riots.
Photos and text by Yalda Moaiery

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I am 220: Surviving a Migrant Boat Di...
Trapani, Italy
By Transterra Editor
11 Oct 2013

October 15, 2013
Trapani, Italy

"I am 27 years old, originally I came from Nigeria. I crossed from Libya to Italy in a small boat. 105 people went with me and 103 of them survived," said Refugee 220.

In Sicily I stumbled upon a fenced camp in the harbor town of Trapani. At this camp I met number 220. He is one of about 800 people who crossed over from Africa to Italy in the last three weeks. After the tragedy of the third of October, the sea has become a human cemetery. Number 220 is one of the lucky ones. He made it to land.

Number 220 says he was living in Libya, but the situation there drove him to attempt the crossing. He survived, but two women on his small boat died before a commercial ship took them on board. Eventually they ended up in an old gym in Trapani. He spends his days here with 85 other young men. ‘This is already better than Libya, I feel safe here and don’t hear gunshots anymore.’

The men in the gym have no idea what will happen to them. They don’t speak a word of Italian and the guards of the camp don’t speak English. They are totally in the dark about their status and tell me I am the first person to speak English to them since they arrived.

Since the guards don’t give me any information either, and won’t let me enter the camp, number 220 and me decide to meet outside the camp. Here I give him a disposable camera, so he can show me his life inside the camp. ‘I don’t do much inside, mainly sleep and sit on the patio with other guys from Nigeria. And wait.’

The quality of these analogue photos is not the best. Number 220 is not a professional photographer. But in my opinion his slightly dark, bleakly colored and out of focus photos perfectly reflect 220’s life at the moment. He lives on the edge of our society. His name is Louis. He could be a friend.

Photos and Text By:
Berta Banacloche / Jeffry Ruigendijk / Refugee 220

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Gun Disease in Myanmar
By Spike Johnson
10 Oct 2013

In the gold mines of Sinktu and Thabait Kyin, in the Mandalay division of Myanmar, gold mining is famous. Over thirty gold mines are active, but the scene doesn't look much like wealth. Half naked men, with rusty pneumatic drills and homemade dynamite are lowered 500 feet, on fraying ropes, into holes in the ground. Covering their faces with rags, they drill gold ore from the stone.

“We break the rocks with high pressured guns, but breathe the small particles that come from breaking the stone. We contract lung infections that we call "gun disease," says Wat Tay, 35, a gold miner from Sintku Township.

This year gold production in the area has doubled due to softening government sanctions and international demand. Myanmar's huge mineral deposits are seen as key sectors in export-driven growth. In recent months the price of gold has slowly risen in Myanmar, possibly linked to the decline of the dollar, as an opportunistic public sell their jewelry at high prices ready to buy back if prices drop.

Forums are being held in capital cities by the Myanmar government, mine owners, and the Ministry of Mines to persuade foreign investment from corporate companies for industrial technology. The idea is to reduce Myanmar's poverty rate from 26 percent to 16 percent by 2015, by exporting the country's gold reserves. However, added demand for export means an increased need for manpower, working hours, and medical support.

Through the night groups of men squat above mine shafts, ankle deep in muddy puddles, waiting to haul out ore or winch up their friends. After working in the mines for around ten years, the worker's lungs give in form undiagnosed diseases. Hidden in bamboo huts, attached to oxygen, they weaze out their last days.

“The owners of gold pits don't care about the health issues of the miners, so the health problems are increasing. They don't pay for safety protection for us, so we make do ourselves, like putting some clothes over our mouths, or buying cheap masks to reduce the dust we breath in,” says Wat Tay.

Miners are given one or two bananas after a shift in the tunnels, to help with nutrition. But no respiration equipment is provided by the mine owners, and the miners don't have the money to invest in equipment themselves. Although cases are frequent, perhaps inevitable, there is no health care system for the miners and no diagnosis of “gun disease.” Instead they are given a tank of oxygen and left to fend for themselves, too weak to seek other employment or to leave their huts.

“I can't breathe well. If I breath my abdominal muscles are tight and it hurts also in my back. I pain feel when I breathe. Twice they've given me pills for Tuberculosis, but this medicine has no effect for me,” says Kwin Tone Sel, 42. He used to mine in Sintku Township, before his lung disease prevented him from leaving his bed.

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October 6th Protests
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

Thousands of protestors took to the street on October 6th not only to commemorate the war against Israel, but many were also calling for the ouster of General Sisi.
By: Leyland Cecco

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Syria Today by Hamza Abozeid
Syria
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

Photos of Syria covering Maskah and Ar Raqqah

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L'Eroica 2013
Gaiole, Italy
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

Every year, during the first weekend of October, thousands of passionate cyclists reach Gaiole, a small village in the Italian region of Chianti, for the most famous old-style tourist cycling event in the world, the so-called "L'Eroica" ("the heroic" ).

Attracted by red wine, the famous "white road" through an amazing landscape just 15 kilometers outside the city of Siena, people from all over the world share their passion for cycling. This year, more than 5.400 participants dived into the past to enjoy the unique atmosphere of the race: old-fashioned clothes, dirty wheels and vintage bikes.

Four different routes with distances between 35 and 200 km wind through the vineyards of Val d'Orcia and Chianti, surrounded by wild animals and the true spirit of cycling. This unique event, the biggest in Italy and one of the most important in the world knows only few rules: only vintage bikes and instead of competition the true spirit of "L'Eroica": a genuine passion for cycling, nature and food.

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October 6th Protests 9
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

Protestors flee volleys of tear gas fired by security forces to disperse a march headed towards Tahrir Square.

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October 6th Protests 11
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

Youth challenge security forces as tear gas is fired towards the crowds.

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October 6th Protests 10
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

Protestors hold up rocks that are thrown at security forces. "They have guns, and this is all we have," said one young protestor.

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October 6th Protests 12
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

Protestors clean of tear gas residue during clashes in Cairo's Dokki district.

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October 6th Protests 13
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

A protestor grabs rocks to throw at security forces. Anti military rule groups clashed with police in Cairo's Dokki district.