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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (17 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Players from the lower part of the Shukhuti village in Georgia celebrating their victory after several hours of Lelo Barti gaming.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (18 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Players from the lower part of the Shukhuti village in Georgia celebrating their victory after several hours of Lelo Barti gaming.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (19 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Players from the lower part of the Shukhuti village in Georgia celebrating their victory after several hours of Lelo Barti gaming.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (20 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Victorious participants placing the Lelo Barti ball on the grave of a former player who recently died.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (2 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Local residents making the 16-kilogram (35 pounds) leather Lelo Burti ball, tightly stuffed with sawdust and soil and topped with red wine. The "ball-stuffing morning" is punctuated with wine toasts, jokes and various discussions about the game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (1 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Local residents making the 16-kilogram (35 pounds) leather Lelo Burti ball, tightly stuffed with sawdust and soil and topped with red wine. The "ball-stuffing morning" is punctuated with wine toasts, jokes and various discussions about the game.

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A Story of A Syrian Village
Homs, Syria
By Smart Media
01 May 2013

Oyoun Hsain is a small village located in the northeastern countryside of Homs with a population of less than 4000 people.
The area was not subjected to either armed or peaceful revolutionary movements, but it fell victim to shelling and other destructive measures.
A massacre was on the verge of occurring, but the Free Syrian Army intervened and stopped it by evacuating the villagers away.

However, many people were killed due to the continuous shelling by warplanes, artillery and tanks from the battalion next to the village. Mercenaries also broke into the village several times and killed people. In addition to that, more than 120 people were kidnapped. Until this moment, nobody knows anything about what happened to those kidnapped people.
The film shows the destruction in the village after the evacuation of its inhabitants.
The buildings’ ruins embed the village’s memory, the people’s properties and their children’s food.

The film authenticates the story of the village. The film is a call for humanity sent to the neighboring villages, where mercenaries live in and still support the regime. It reminds them of the past years when they lived peacefully together; when all the sects in Syria lived in peaceful coexistence.
The film aims to wake up the remnant of humanity and mercy in neighbors’ hearts; the friends yesterday and the executioners today.

Transcript:
00:47 This is Oyoun Hsain Al-Janoubiah with a population of 1700 to 2000 people

00:53 It was living a normal life with its neighbor villages, one of them is Al-Ameriah, Hsain Al-Shamaliah Oyoun Al-Dananeer and Al-Misherfih villages

01:01 The regime recruited these villages a long time ago to prevail the sectarian nature on the revaluation. We lived with them in peace and we had a cordiality relationships; real normal relationships

01:15 In the recent period, The Al-Ameriah people who were supported by Al-Asad gang. They were harassing the village all the time

01:24 They were threatening us by Dushka guns and Armed Ganges and striking us from near areas until they deported their own villages' people, then suddenly, and with no warning, they started to shell this small village

1:43 God is great, God is great, God is great!

01:51 Doesn't he have any mercy shelling us like? We don't have any guns. We don't have any thing. We don't have any weapons. We don't have anything

01:59 To take out our children from the debris. What did we do to him? Look at this. Have a look at how he shelled us. Look at that, people? Doesn't he fear God? What did we do to him ? What did we do? Look at that.

02:09 He destroyed the water tanks. He destroyed the lands, the windows, too. We have nothing anymore, nothing at all

02:16 This house, this house; he destroyed it above its people. The children and their mother were sitting here. They were sitting here, in this specific house. Does he need to pull it down on us? What did we do to him? The mercenaries came and stole the doors and the windows of the houses They left us nothing. They left us nothing. They stole everything.

02:26 What did we do to them? These are our houses. Destroyed, they are all pulled down

02:46 I couldn't take a Jar of Makdouse or olives from my house. I paid for this jar and preserve it to feed my children. He made me throw it away

02:57 This teapot, which I want to make tea with; I couldn't make tea for my children. He made me lose it

03:03 These are my children's clothes. Doesn't he fear God? What are these? These dishes, he broke these dishes to prevent us from eating or drinking, he wants to kill us. What is worse than that?

03:15 These lentils, I brought for my children and I couldn't take it with me

03:20 Doesn't he fear God to do that? Doesn't he fear God? What did we do to him?

03:26 My house, can I live in it now?

03:32 We called the free army, God bless them. They came and took out our children and wives and the old people. And we, the young people went with our wives and old people because we have nothing.

03:43 We don't have guns or weapons because we were living in peace. We were like a family.

03:47 The free army comes and asks us: what is the situation in here? We say, they are our family, our people, our brothers. Don't hurt them.

03:55 When the free army came we told them: don't harm them. They are our family, our brothers. We are living together, they wouldn't hurt us.

04:04 The free army goes. Until some day we went to beg the free army to ask them to take out our children and wives from the destroyed houses.

04:12 There were people sitting in here, people were sitting here. Imagine, people were sitting here, he shelled us with MiGs

04:19 Doesn't he fear God? I swear to God that is unbelievable

04:23 Look at that! We were sitting and watching TV. We were sitting, in the house here. Look at that, we didn't move anything.

04:32 Look at the glass. We were sitting peacefully. If the free army didn't come,

04:36 God bless them, God bless them, we wouldn't get out alive from here, we and our children and wives

04:41 And let them deal with the Asad gangs. We have nothing to do with them

04:45 We will come back to the village, against your will, against your will Asad gangs. We will come back to our village, God willing, with the free army's help.

04:55 The free army will bring us back to our village and protect us. We don't want your protection. We want the free army to protect us, because you betrayed us. We were with you, but you betrayed us.

05:05 You said the free army is armed gangs. They are not armed gangs. Now you are the armed gangs

05:10 You are shelling us with missiles. At least the armed gangs you were talking about is the free army, who is better than you. They didn't shell us with missiles. They took out our children from the debris, from the bricks. did you do for us? Tell me what did you do for us? You broke the electricity pedestals. These are your reforms?You are shelling us with cannons. Do it. Do it, we don't fear anyone but God.

05:31 We don't fear anyone but God. What do you have more? Do you have anything else to shell us with? You don't have any? Shell us, as much as you want.

05:45 My neighbors of the other sect. We sit together, eat the same food, drink the same water and we stay together. What did we do to them? Ask them, people, did we hurt them? We didn't hurt them, we didn't fight with them.

05:58 If they need anything, they come to me. If I need anything I go to them. What did we do to them? He destroyed our houses. He shelled us with cannons and tanks. What do we have to shell him back with? What do we have?

06:11 Where are the people? The people left are living in wild, under trees. Who is with us?Just us. Let him come to us. Let him come to kill us. What more does he have?

06:24 He shelled us with MiG, helicopters and exploding barrels. What these things are, we didn't know them before him. He threw barrels on us; cannons and tanks, he doesn't have anything else

06:35 He brought MiGs here to shell this store, MiG! A warplane! Squadron …Because we have? What makes him send a warplane? We have bomb action guns to fire on the Warplane. He sent the warplane, because we are making two hundred Syrian pounds a day.

06: 49 We thought that he has warplanes to fight Israel. He has it to fight us, Oyoun Hsain Al-Janoubiah village

06:56 Read this "Oyoun Hsain Al-Janouby school"

07:01 This school is for our children or not! Say that we are lying and this is not a school; that this is not a school. Is this a school or what? Whose this for? Isn't it for my children? Isn't it for my children?

07:14 Look at it, they shelled it. Look at it. They made holes in it

07:18 Have a Look inside it. They broke windows and doors. Have a look in here Look, This is the school, This is the school

07:54 "avant-garde promise""I promise in front of my classmates to be a perfect avant-garde -1" "To do my duty to the country, the party and the leader -2" to act according the law of the avant-garde and do good every -3"

"day "Directorate of Education in Homs" "Oyoun Al-Hsain Al-Janoubiah school C2" "first term exam 2006/2007" ":class" ":course" ":number" ":paper numbers" ":absence" ":corrector" ":checker" "Directorate of Education in Homs"

08:47 "Oyoun Hsain Al-Janouby school" "first circle"

08:50 Now, the shelling still going on in the village areas. So he shelled it with helicopters and MiG warplane. And he shelled the sensitive positions in this village.

09:03 He destroyed the mosques. He made them debris

09:07 He shelled the main water tank which nourishes the village with water and removed all life factors in it

09:33 We used to pray in this mosque, he destroyed it.

09:41 He destroyed this mosque; we were praying in it. He destroyed it by tanks

09:47 swear to God, he destroyed our mosque by tanks. Have a look, he destroyed all. We were praying in it

09:55 What were we doing but praying in here? He shelled us with cannon because we were praying? Doesn't he fear God? Don't you fear God? We were praying here. What were we doing? I swear we were praying here. Should you shell us with cannon because we were praying in here? Should you shell us with tank because we were praying? What are we doing against you?

10:22 There is a cannon near here, it's 130 caliber which is shelling the village constantly, also with tanks and mortars until it destroyed this village almost completely.

10:38 God is great, God is great. God is great, God is great. God is great - God is great.

10:53 Now there are no people in this village. Nobody lives in it but the resistor free army

11:32 Keep your head down

11:35 There is a tank over there. I hope that we hurt it. We attacked it last time. And there is a village over there. In the south, there is lots of mercenaries in it. There is a tank there, it attacks us, too. the cannons and the barracks are behind it

11:54 they are fortified and hiding

11:58 They made trenches

12:04 Of course we came in to take out the people. We took out all the people from the village to repel the Asad gangs who tried to make a Massacre in Oyoun Hsain village, I mean here in this village. We went in and took out all the people. Now we are sitting here in the front line to repel the gangs of the tyrant

12:28 He really is a tyrant

12:33 As you see, we are in the front lines, in rain, wind and cold weather. Thank God we are defeating them. God willing, they will not come forward any step here, God willing, we will go forward until we defeat him. Him and his mercenaries.

13:00 As you can see, here are our brothers. Here are our brothers

13:11 There is one hole, one sniper. You can come to see through the hole

13:27 They wanted to come in this small village to do a massacre here. Certainly nobody would know about this small village until a massacre takes place in it. Nobody knows about it so far. If a massacre took place in it, all people would know about it. We are a few in numbers who came in to take out the people

13:46 We have light weapons not big weapons, I mean small weapons. But thank God we made trenches. We are taking positions and can't leave this place at all because it's facing them.

14:04 We are completely facing them. So If we leave this place, they can come forward then as they have tanks, and they made trenches inside their area.

14:17 For what? We don't know

14:20 I hear you Abo-Abdo. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul

14:40 Our neighbors are from the other sect; we are living together, eat same food and drink same water. We have nothing against them. He kept shelling us until he separated us and made it a sectarian issue. He is the one who made it like this. We were not sectarian people

14:55 He is shelling everyday. He calls for mercenaries to attack us. Why? What did we do to him? We don't want anything

15:02 We don't want anything anymore

15:07 Attack us. Leave, we don't want you anymore. We don't want you to stay in here

15:12 We are one family, we are neighbors. Our lands are next to yours. If the regime leaves or not, we are going to live together again. Don't think about it. Don't be drifted by the regime. Don't be drifted by the tyrant Bashar

15:25 Wake up, come back to your families, to your neighbors. We will be neighbors, families, forever.

15:32 He will do with you as he did with us. Don't think that he will leave you in peace. But we still one family

15:37 Wake up and go back to your village, to your people. I won't say more

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Shadows of Silk
Surin
By Transterra Editor
30 Apr 2013

Surin is located in the rural east of Thailand, in the province Isaan. Agriculture, the main industry of the region, was once supplemented by sericulture. Such an arrangement was making the households self-sufficient, ensuring food on the table and shirts on one’s back. My host, Pimnipa, used to grow and weave silk herself, but two years ago an extremely hot summer killed all her silkworms putting her out of business. Subsequently, she had to abandon her loom. The raw silk-thread is not easy to get and the prices went up, as only few suppliers managed to survive. Pimnipa is my guide to what remains of the local silk industry. She takes me under the roofs of the sparse houses that are still involved in silk-making, so that I can learn about the process. Several years ago each household was self-reliant but today people had to specialize to get by. Those who grow silk, usually don’t weave, and those who dye thread, don’t rear the worms and so on. It’s not a solvent business anymore. Nowadays, the climate change and the low profitability also top the reasons for the widespread reluctance to invest in sericulture. It takes both, time and patience. Silkworms are voracious eaters, and yet they're extremely fragile and vulnerable to insects, noises or heat. Recent very hot summers resulting in hundreds of baskets full of dead caterpillars left a large hole in the finances of many villagers. Like in Pimnipa’s case, those baskets were then put aside never to be looked at again. Each handmade silk cloth is unique and easily recognizable because of its irregularities and occasional knots. The patterns are often a signature of the village or even a family, secretly guarded for generations. In spite of its beauty, the handmade silk attracts less and less buyers every year. Due to the time and labor required to make a piece of fabric, this product is not cheap. Since the markets are overflowing with cheap factory-made silk from China, small looms struggle with distribution. A loom on the porch was once a sight as common as a buffalo in the Surin villages. Today more often one can see those tools in the far corner of the backyards, like sad decaying carcasses of the by-gone self-sufficiency. But there are a couple areas where the hand-woven silk brings great returns. Ban Thasawang is one such village, a place of great renown as it produces the silk for the Royal Family itself. The less fortunate weavers are mostly Pimnipa’s age or older. Their daughters and granddaughters are unlikely to learn the craft. The youth flees from the villages to the cities, and even if they remain, they indulge in far more “sophisticated” pastimes like watching TV or taking drugs. The household silk production, a vehicle for women empowerment and a source of their pride, is in the hands of the passing generation. And without a rescue plan they may die alongside. Photos by Gloria Kurnik

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Leishmania spreads in Syria
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
28 Apr 2013

Leishmania spreads in Syria.
A video report about this disease from the village of Maar Shourin which is located in the countryside of Idleb.

Due to the lack of basic amenities and health care in Syria, Leishmaniasis, a complex disease, has been affecting a large number of the population in Idleb, northern Syria. The disease is transmitted through the a bite of a sandfly, affecting different parts of the body, resulting in sores on the skin and welts. The sores, sometimes, get infected.

Since the basic conditions of the Syrian people is very poor, the disease is most likely to be fatal. Also, regarding the fact that wartime conditions compromise the immune system, this disease is bound to spread quickly.

The medicine required for treatment is scarce in Syria, but the people of Idlib are attempting to assist every infected person without a fee.

It is difficult, at the moment, to assess the number of Leishmaniasis cases in Syria, but the poor conditions showed that the disease will continue transmitting from one person to another.

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Little Jerusalem in Italy (1 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

Pitigliano, Italy. Pitigliano is known as "Little Jerusalem." During the 19th Century 10 per cent of the Pitigliano population was Jewish. Today there are only three remaining Jewish residents.

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Broom makers of Manito, Albay (9 of 16)
Manito, Albay, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
12 Apr 2013

Broomcorn grasses are dried outside the houses of the villagers of Manito, Albay.

Broomcom (Sorghum Vulgare) is a variety of upright grass mostly found on the mountainous area of Manito, Albay. One of the major livelihood of people in this far flung area is making soft brooms and they sell each broom from 20 pesos to 150 pesos.

Soft brooms made from broomcorn grasses are the oldest form of cleaning and sweeping tool used around the world.

Manito, Albay is around 15 hours away from Manila, capital of Philippines.

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Yörük village
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

This village is in Kılbasan, an area of Karaman. The buildings are protected by the government so that no more construction can take place.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Yörük sheperd, Eyüp
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

This village is in Kılbasan, an area of Karaman. The buildings are protected by the government so that no more construction can take place.

Eyüp said he had horses, but wasn't able to build a barn or pen to contain them. He said they have become property of the mountain.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Yörük sheperd, Bayram Bulut
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Bayram has 4 children, 3 that are educated and live in other cities, and a son who has remained to work with his father. He says you can become educated or you can look a goat in the ass. These are the options for modern day nomads.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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The Death of a Village
Sawantwadi, Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
11 Mar 2013

Thirty-eight yea-old Kishan Chauhan lost his leg to gangrene after a lesion caused by arsenic poisoning became infected

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The Story of the Gold Mine in India
Karnataka, India
By Mais Istanbuli
10 Mar 2013

India’s abandoned Mangalur mine has been closed for 20 years, however, its toxic waste continues to haunt the lives of those inhabiting surrounding villages.

In Kanataka’s Raichur District, mine tailings continue to be dumped on farmland, rendering it not only unfertile, but also poisonous to residents. Tests on soil samples have shown this practice has effectively made the soil unsafe for use for at least 25 years.

Economic and social sectors are not the only areas suffering as a result of the toxic dumping. Locals ominously refer to the area as the 'cyanide' mountain, owing to the large amounts of sodium cyanide present in the tailings.

Chandibai, a 70-year old woman from Kiradali Tanda village, has developed deep lesions on her hands because of arsenic in the local drinking water.

Thirty-eight year old Kishan Chauhan has also been highly affected by the poisonous contents of the water. He lost his leg to gangrene after a lesion, caused by arsenic poisoning, became infected. He has since migrated over 500 kilometers away to Dodamargh, Savantwadi in Belgaum, where he earns 200 Rs (around 4 dollars) per week breaking stones. Despite his handicap, he has no choice but to work in hard labor to support his wife and two young daughters.

Dozens of such cases continue to emerge from Kiradali Tanda, where an independent study has shown has shown that water from village wells contains around 303 micrograms of arsenic per liter. The World Health Organization currently cites 10 micrograms per liter as the maximum acceptable level for human exposure.

India’s Mangalur mine, just four kilometers from the arsenic-ridden village of Kiradalli Tandi, originally began as a colonial project of Britain’s empire in the late 19th century. Karnataka’s government briefly reopened the mine nearly 70 years later, until flooding again forced it to close in 1994.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Talib...
Swat, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 Mar 2013

Sijban village is located deep in the Swat Valley, which was ruled by the Taliban before a military operation by Pakistani army restored peace in the area.

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The Vengeful Ghosts Of A Gold Mine
Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
07 Mar 2013

Chandibai, aged 70 shows lesions on her hands caused by arsenic in local drinking water.

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The Death of a Village
Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
07 Mar 2013

According to an independent report by Dipankar Chakravorti, in the village of Kiradali Tanda in Yadgir District of Karnataka, just four kilometres from the Mangalur mine, this borewell indicated an arsenic level of 303 ugL-1. The acceptable level of arsenic, according to the World Health Organization, is 10 ugL-1.

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Goat POV
Amboseli National Park, Kenya
By MediaMikeDC
05 Mar 2013

A goats point of view living in a Masai village in Amboseli National Park, Kenya.

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All Alone
Marrakesh, Morocco
By MediaMikeDC
21 Feb 2013

A young Moroccan boy walking to his home in the Atlas Mountains outside Marrakesh, Morocco.

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Kuzu "Sheep"
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Sheep are on their way back home after a day grazing on the mountainside.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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3 Generations, Hasan Ali, Mehmet and ...
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Hasan Ali, 92 years old, insists the way of life for the Yörük is finished.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Mopti, Mali (2 of 3)
Mopti, Mali.
By George Henton
01 Feb 2013

Images from Mopti, Mali, taken during the ongoing conflict in West Africa.

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Mopti, Mali (1 of 3)
Mopti, Mali.
By George Henton
01 Feb 2013

Image from Mopti, Mali, taken during the ongoing conflict in West Africa.

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Sarabdek 04
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
03 Oct 2012

Sarabdek with his youngest daughter (in a middle) and his daughter in law (at the left).

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Sarabdek 05
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
02 Oct 2012

Boy threshes grain with oxen. In the village as electricity is not reliable most of the work is done manually or with the help of animals.

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Sarabdek 06
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
02 Oct 2012

Somersault on a haystack of threshed grain.

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Sarabdek 10
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
01 Oct 2012

Physical education classes. In the village there are two schools, primary and secondary. There are 180 students.

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“WITH TIBET IN SIGHT: A TALE OF ONE M...
Pangong Tso Lake, India
By Andreanewilliams
20 Sep 2012

Nearly 14 000 feet above sea level, on the arid shores of Pangong “Tso” (lake), flies a lone Tibetan flag.

On occasion, travellers manage to make the 5-hour journey here from Leh during the short summer season, stopping at monasteries and roadside yurts along the way. And if they travel as far down the lakeside as possible - without stepping into Chinese territory - to the remote village of Spangmik, they will undoubtedly see it whipping about in the wind.

In democratic India, this flag's presence may seem benign - but on the opposite shore of Pangong Tso’s salty waters, lies Tibet; and just a few kilometers south of Spangmik, lies an army checkpost.

In such close proximity to Tibet, 68-year-old Tsering Dondup is literally flying the Tibetan flag in the face of China.

Pangong Lake sits on the Sino-India Line of Actual Control, with more than 60 per cent of its 134km length being under Chinese control.

Dondup, himself, first arrived in India in 1959 after his parents were killed in clashes with Chinese troops at the height Tibet’s occupation in the 1950s. Initially motivated to avenge the death of his parents, Dondup went on to join the Indian Army in Mussoorie, northern India, in 1968.

Fifteen years later, he met and fell in love with a young woman from Spangmik village. In 1989, they married.

He smacks his lips together and lets out a sigh, as he reflects on his relationship with his wife of 23 years. “My wife may be illiterate, but she loves me so deeply.”

Following his marriage, he became focused on creating a home - in plain sight of Tibet - with his new wife on the rocky banks of Pangong Tso.

But as a reminder of his past, Dondup flies a little piece of his history on the flagpole outside of his home, with the hope of one day returning to Tibet.

“I want to see the birds, the sheep, the horses. I want to see them again," he says. "Are they there, or not? I don’t know."

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Lost In The Jungle (30 of 31)
Etaeto, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
10 Sep 2012

Kalibo Mandigo - Etaeto - Democratic Republic of Congo - September 10th, 2012

The hunt for precious coltan is killing Africa's dwindling Pygmy population. The village of Kalibo Mandigo, located in the Ituri rain forest in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, lies in the heart of an obscure war zone that few in the West know about. The densely forested expanse along a stretch of border between the nation once known as Zaire and Uganda, furnishes some 80 percent of planet's Columbite Tantalite, or "coltan," an ore that is an essential ingredient in the creation of the miniature Tantalum capacitors present in virtually all electronic devices, including laptops, cell phones and pagers. Coltan is panned for by hand in much the same way as gold during the California gold rush of the 19th century. The demand by major companies such as Nokia and Sony for coltan (Australia is the other major source) has made the Congo into a battleground for rogue miners, who enter the country, through Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi. The number of Pygmies is in constant decline as a result of the border fighting. On the move constantly, the pygmies, who are considered inferior, face the wrath of Congolese troops and Rwandan raiders who cross the border seeking the coltan. They were victims of rape, murder and cannibalism. According to Minority Rights Group International there is extensive evidence of mass killing, cannibalism and rape of Pygmies and they have urged the International Criminal Court to investigate a campaign of extermination against pygmies. Although they have been targeted by virtually all the armed groups, much of the violence against Pygmies is attributed to the rebel group, Movement for the Liberation of Congo.

The picture shows a pygmi man who lost his entire family after a rwandan rebel interamwe, raid Kalibo Mandigo village. His hut was totally devasted and destroyed by those rebels.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
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Gul Khandana, a head teacher at Sijban girls primary school in Swat Valley attends morning assembly with her students.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
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08 Mar 2012

Head teacher Gul Khandana inspects morning assembly at her girls primary school. Th village of Sijban and surrounding areas were under Taliban rule for a short period before Pakistani army operations began.