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child labor in venezuela 12
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

The hands of workers after a day of work on a carrots harvest. Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

A 14 year old girl work on a carrots harvest in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 01
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers poses for a photograph before starting another day of work in the potatoes field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers take cover from the cold rain during work on a potatoes field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A teenager works on a potatoes harvest in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

Josein, a 13 year old worker, prepares his gloves during a potatoes harvest. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
04 Nov 2014

Cemetery of Pueblo Llano, Venezuela, a town with the highest suicide rate in Venezuela, 18 per 100.000 inhabitants.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
04 Nov 2014

Teenagers mark some words in a wall inside Pueblo Llano's cemetery. In this place women have been raped several times by drunk men. One of the reasons of suicides in Pueblo Llano is related with relationship problems.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Children play on their break from work with the crops inside the Adela Rojas Public School in Las Agujas zone in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Luis is 11 and prefers to help the adults harvest crops than to go to school in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

It is common to see children playing with their toys around the crops in Los Andes, that is how easy children can obtain pesticides that farmers leave behind in the fields. In Pueblo Llano, pesticides are the main weapon for suicides in agriculture zones around the world.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Teenager workers drive a motorbike inside the town of Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Most of the children who leave the school in Pueblo Llano dreams about getting a motorbike or a big truck to get the girls' attention.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Several empty packages of pesticides are seen around the fields, schools, houses and neighborhoods in Pueblo Llano without warning. Pesticides are the main weapon of suicide in agriculture zones around the world.

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Otro Cielo (Another Sky) - An Uruguay...
Montevideo
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Sep 2014

Another Sky is a journey into Uruguayan daily life at the time of Pepe Mujica, a documentary work focused on social changes taking place in the country. Looking for answers, I drove over 1300km from the capital Montevideo, to the north (the poorest regions) and to the east, to learn the truth about a people who craves change and hope for a new brighter future.
Another Sky is a road-trip along the utopia, through civil rights, rural culture, African religion and alternative lifestyles.

The country's economy currently is growing stronger, but in the remote countryside an old culture seems untouched by globalization. Almost 100 thousand people, Gauchos, Peones or farmers still share the environment with animals. With three cows per person Uruguay, is one of the biggest "meat-economies" in the world; and 75% of the country's exports are agriculture related.

In Montevideo, where about one-third of the country population lives, you find a place where politics and football dominate discussions and social life.

Uruguay is a place where sailors, European immigrants and African slaves left their stories, their incomprehensible melancholy and their different traditions. Uruguay is a "latin hope" spiced with meat, cerveza, Umbanda (an Afro-Brazilian faith) and Socialism.

Photo collection: http://www.transterramedia.com/collections/2678

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Otro Cielo (Another Sky) - An Uruguay...
Montevideo
By Francesco Pistilli
21 Sep 2014

Another Sky is a journey into Uruguayan dailylife at the time of Pepe Mujica, a documentary work focused on social changes taking place in the country. Looking for answers, I drove over 1300km from the capital Montevideo, to the north (the poorest regions) and to the east, to learn the truth about a people who craves change and hope for a new brighter future.
Another Sky is a road-trip along the utopia, through civil rights, rural culture, african religion and alternative lifestyles.

The country's economy currently is growing stronger, but in the remote countryside an old culture seems untouched by globalization. Almost 100 thousand people, Gauchos, Peones or farmers still share the environment with animals. With three cows per person Uruguay, is one of the biggest "meat-economies" in the world; and 75% of the country's exports are agriculture related.

In Montevideo, where about one-third of the country population lives, you find a place where politics and football dominate discussions and social life.

Uruguay is a place where sailors, European immigrants and African slaves left their stories, their incomprehensible melancholy and their different traditions. Uruguay is a "latin hope" spiced with meat, cerveza, Umbanda (an Afro-Brazilian faith) and Socialism.

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Amagonzo: Visiting the World's Most P...
Shaime, Zamora Chinchipe
By Austin Mackell
01 Aug 2014

Anthropologist turned journalist Christian Tym journeys into the Amazon to the town of Shaime to talk to the the local Shuar people about their use of the psychedelic ancestral medicine ayahuasca - and to take a dose himself.

Ayahuasca is a psychoactive brew of Banisteriopsis caapi vine in combination with various plants, long drank by numerous indigenous peoples of the Amazon for divinatory and healing purposes. The hallucinogenic properties of the brew are well noted, and people who have taken it report experiences they liked to spiritual enlightenment and understanding the nature of the universe.

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Karim Benzema
Salvador da Bahia
By Ralf Falbe
20 Jun 2014

Brazil, Salvador da Bahia
French National Soccer Team player Karim Benzema before the match, France vs Switzerland, FIFA World Cup, June 20, 2014.

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Brazilian Military Police
Salvador Da Bahia, Bahia
By Ralf Falbe
20 Jun 2014

Brazil, Salvador da Bahia, 20.06.2014, Fifa World Cup 2014, France vs. Switzerland, Military Police in the Arena Fonte Nova before the match.

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Cristiano Ronaldo
Salvador da Bahia
By Ralf Falbe
16 Jun 2014

Brazil, Salvador da Bahia
Portuguese National Soccer Team player Cristiano Ronaldo sings the Portuguese National Anthem before the match, Portugal vs Germany, FIFA World Cup, June 16, 2014.

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Startup Turns Fishing Nets Into Skate...
Santiago, Chile
By Zachary F. Volkert
23 May 2014

TOPLINE: Ben Kneppers is giving waste wheels with the Bureo Skateboards project – recycling used fishing nets from along the Chilean coast and turning them into skateboards and, in the future, a slew of other products.

When Ben Kneppers arrived to Chile in 2012 two things struck him: the country’s rapid economic development was making it a goldmine for entrepreneurs, and that its 2,000-mile coastline was being marred by pollution.

Discarded fishing nets drifting in the ocean ensnare animals all of over the world – which is no exception in the nation’s robust fishing industry.

“In my visits to coastal communities early on I was really struck by how little there was to manage [fishing net pollution],” Kneppers said. “But we thought, ‘What if there was a system to prevent the pollution, but also upcycle it into funds, so that we would be able to get back to these communities [to collect more nets].”

Shortly after, Knepper’s company Bureo – taken from the native Mapuche population’s word for wave – received a $40,000 grant from local incubator program Start-Up Chile.

When Kneppers first started the project with his two partners – David Strover and Kevin Ahearn – the three were looked on a bit suspiciously by the fisherman, who dubbed them “Los Tres Gringos Locos” – the three crazy white guys.

“When we first came there I honestly don’t think the fisherman believed or understood, in our poor Spanish, exactly what we were doing,” Knepper said. “They were like, ‘Why are they scrubbing our trash, what is this?’”

“Scrubbing their trash” meant stripping down the used nets with brushes before sending them to being “shredded, pelletized and injected”, says Knepper, until they become plastic material that the skateboards are made out of.

After showing the fisherman video of the process as well as the final product, the community became much more receptive to the idea – bins to collect the nets are always full now and the recycled nets travel back to Santiago on the same trucks the fishermen use.

“We’re turning off the faucet, rather than wiping up the mess of water around the room,” he said. “It’s much more efficient and effective way to approach – this we work directly with the fishing communities, where they’re using the nets … and collecting them right at the source.”

Since launching in Coquímbo in January earlier this year, the company has used more than 2 tons of recycled fishing nets to make their own line of environmentally friendly skateboards. Next week they land in Chilean port city Concepción, where the industry is larger than their current total operation.

“Seventy large scale artisanal boats and several commercial fishing companies,” Kneppers said. “We estimate they are turning well-over 500 tons of nets a year.”

After an endorsement from American musician Jack Johnson as well as support from companies like Patagonia and program assistants the World Wildlife Federation, the company recently brought in $65,000 in a Kickstarter campaign – three times their original goal. It’s the kind of funding that the group hopes to use to expand beyond their initial gimmick – the create products from the material that millions of people use daily.

After making appearances on local TV stations, Knepper jokes that he had received 100s of Facebook requests from young Chileans interested in the project. While at a local skate park a boy rolls over to chat with him about the project – word is spreading about the gringos who recycle the nets into skateboards.

“Just as a wave starts with this small change on the surface of the ocean , we’re starting with a small change in an ocean of plastic,” Knepper said. “Yes, we’re 3 gringos on the ground making this little impact now, but if we can make that build up with time and energy we could making more and more products – that’s what we really believe in.”

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Startup nets to boards #6
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

Knepper shows off the sturdy plastic skateboard that was once only a tangled pile of fishing nets. Fisherman have grown quite receptive to the project, but at first were confused by the process and dubbed the Bureo team “Los Tres Gringos Locos” – the three crazy white guys.

“When we first came there I honestly don’t think the fisherman believed or understood, in our poor Spanish, exactly what we were doing,” Knepper said. “They were like, ‘Why are they scrubbing our trash, what is this?’”

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Startup nets to boards #2
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

The skateboards are patterned with fish scales as a tribute to the sea life that the project saves by recycling the nets.

“In my visits to coastal communities early on I was really struck by how little there was to manage [fishing net pollution],” Kneppers said. “But we thought, ‘What if there was a system to prevent the pollution, but also upcycle it into funds, so that we would be able to get back to these communities [to collect more nets].”

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Startup nets to boards #1
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

Ben Kneppers is giving waste wheels with the Bureo Skateboards project – recycling used fishing nets from along the Chilean coast and turning them into skateboards and, in the future, a slew of other products. The company has recycled 2 tons of fishing nets and raised more than $60,000 since January.

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Startup nets to boards #3
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

After making appearances on local TV stations, Knepper jokes that he had received 100s of Facebook requests from young Chileans interested in the project. Here, a young Chilean boy skates over after recognizing Knepper to offer his compliments about the project. They talk for several minutes.

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Startup nets to boards #7
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

Knepper takes a closer look at the surface of his board, making sure every joint is tight.

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Startup nets to boards #8
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

After showing the fisherman video of the process as well as the final product, the community became much more receptive to the idea – bins to collect the nets are always full now and the recycled nets travel back to Santiago on the same trucks the fishermen use.

“We’re turning off the faucet, rather than wiping up the mess of water around the room,” he said. “It’s much more efficient and effective way to approach – this we work directly with the fishing communities, where they’re using the nets … and collecting them right at the source.”

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Startup nets to boards #5
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

Knepper rides his skateboard through central Santiago, passing through Plaza Italia.

Since launching in Coquímbo in January earlier this year, the company has used more than 2 tons of recycled fishing nets to make their own line of environmentally friendly skateboards. Next week they land in Chilean port city Concepción, where the industry is larger than their current total operation.

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Tens of thousands march...#9
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

Clashes spread across blocks of the city and were not put fully under control until late into the afternoon - largely due to the force of water trucks such as the one pictured here which releases powerful blasts from canons at three different levels.

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Tens of thousands march...#7
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

As the protests are youth focused, many of those who are detained are extremely young. A girl who looks no older than 12 is hauled into police custody here as friends scream for her release.

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Tens of thousands march...#8
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

Police arrest young protesters such as the one pictured here, although it is difficult to convict their offenses under Chilean law. During this protest, 20 police were injured, three from being hit by molotov cocktails.

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Tens of thousands march...#13
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

An officer peeks out of his armored vehicle after plowing into the plaza to look around. He shuts it quickly before moving back into action.

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Tens of thousands march...#5
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

Heavy bursts of water fly from canons on the tops of armored police vehicles, throwing leaves and protesters running from them. Tear gas is also mixed into various batches of the liquid ammunition.

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Tens of thousands march...#12
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

Despite the student movement's youthful outlook, older citizens can be seen throughout the crowds at the protest, such as this man who cheers along with a speech about the importance of the movement to fighting inequality in Chile. The country has one of the worst income inequalities in South America, consistently ranked with one of the lowest Gini coefficients globally by the OECD.

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Tens of thousands march...#11
By Zachary F. Volkert
07 May 2014

Students are also asking for reforms to extend to high school, leveling the advantage that families who can afford private education have. Tomás Leighton, spokesperson for high school student federation Cones, believes that funding can be reached through a few key changes that focus on the country looking inward.

“The money needs to come from a tax reform,” Leighton said. “But Chile is also a mining country with a lot of copper that is going to multinational companies, that are also arriving here to flood citizens with malls and shopping centers.”

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Valparaíso Fire Cerro Ramaditas Resid...
Chile, Valparaíso
By Zachary F. Volkert
17 Apr 2014

A haze rose over Cerro Ramaditas in Valparaíso, Chile, on Sunday morning. Part of it was the Pacific Ocean fog that rolls in over the coastal city at every dawn. But the rest is rising up from the ground in the form of smoke.

Ashes line the streets of where thousands of citizens of Valparaíso lived only a few short days ago when a fire hit the city that claimed 2,500 homes - leaving 11,000 citizens in the city with nothing but tents on their property.

The brightest spots on the scorched earth cerro are governmental and community aid have to help the struggling citizens. But how will houses where generation of families living in poverty - sometimes with 15 or more people people living within their walls - rise from the ashes?

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PHOTOSTORY: Valparaíso Fire Cerro Ram...
Chile, Valparaíso
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 Apr 2014

Marcés (right) stands in front of all that remains of a house that he, his three brothers and their families lived in for the last 23 years. In total, 15 members of Marcés' family now live in tents without sewage systems or potable water.

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PHOTOSTORY: Valparaíso Fire Cerro Ram...
Chile, Valparaíso
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 Apr 2014

Cerro Ramaditas, a poor district of the port city of Valparaíso, Chile, may sometimes be filled with garbage, but currently it is filled with ashes.

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Valparaíso Fire Emergency Animal Shel...
Chile, Valparaíso
By Transterra Editor
14 Apr 2014

National Chilean newspaper of record "El Mercurio" lines the cage of a resting dog

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PHOTOSTORY: Valparaíso Fire Cerro Ram...
Chile, Valparaíso
By Zachary F. Volkert
14 Apr 2014

Margarita Peñas drives through the camp as the sun rises at 6 a.m., carrying her children, a crate of sandwiches and a giant thermos of hot water in the back of her car to those who have returned to the scorched area.

"When people go through bad times, you have to bring them what they can’t get by themselves,” Peñas said. “How can you watch these people watching suffering on the television and not do something?”

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PHOTOSTORY: Valparaíso Fire Cerro Ram...
Chile, Valparaíso
By Zachary F. Volkert
14 Apr 2014

“All of the people [living here] are literally in the street right now,” Marcés said. “...You have just to get back to work. This is where my family will build their home again."