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The Amazonian Rain Forest: Farming an...
Amazon, Brazil
By Illuminati Filmes
20 Sep 2016

This collection highlights the deforestation of the Amazon due to cattle farming and corn farming. Various shots provide a look at the rain forest in its virgin state; workers felling trees to clear the land; a fire at night from slash and burn agriculture; a cattle ranch on cleared rain forest and a corn farm on cleared rain forest land. 

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Cattle Ranch in the Amazonian Rain Fo...
Amazon, Brazil
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a cattle ranch in the Amazonian Rain Forest built on cleared Amazonian Rain Forest.

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Corn Farm in the Amazonian Rain Forest
Amazon, Brazil
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a corn farm featuring wide, sweeping vistas of corn and irrigation equipment in the Brazilian province of Minas Gerais. The corn farm was built on cleared rain forest land.

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Fire in the Amazonian Rain Forest (Sl...
Amazon, Brazil
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain Forest using the slash and burn technique.

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Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain F...
Amazon, Brazil
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of workers clearing and moving trees in the Amazonian Rain Forest using heavy equipment, bulldozers and front-loaders.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 53
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (left), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 52
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 54
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, and her friend Graciela (left), walk downstairs to the metro station after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 55
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez, 46, from Bolivia, travels by metro after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Bogota centro
Bogotá, Colombia
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Vista de Bogotá desde el edificio Colpatria

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Bogotá Norte
Bogotá, Colombia
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Vías del tren de la sábana que conduce a Zipaquirá, en el norte de Bogotá.

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Bogotá Sur
Bogotá, Colombia
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Casas de ocupación en el barrio de Soacha al sur de Bogotá, estrato 1.

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Monserrate
Bogotá, Colombia
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Vistas de la ciudad desde el cerro de Monserrate, uno de los lugares más visitados de Bogotá.

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100 Dogs 01
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, prepares to feed her two akitas. The akitas are only two of her more than 100 dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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100 Dogs 02
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, locking out two of his small dogs from the kitchen. Prado and his wife care for over 100 dogs in their home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 03
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreria Prado, 70, with four of her dogs. Prado and her husband care for over 100 dogs in their home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 04
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreria Prado, 70, moves through her kitchen, careful not to step on any of her dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 05
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80 (center) with his wife Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, as they clean up after their dogs. They adopted their first two dogs 15 years ago. Ever since, Mrs. Prado slowly began adopting abandodned dogs from their neighborhood. Today they estimate thay have at least 100 dogs at home. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 06
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, shoos some of her many dogs with a broom. While the presence of so many dogs in such a small space gives off a feeling of chaos, Prado says the dogs are ultimately quite well behaved. Moments of fighting and aggression are outweighed by generally cooperative and playful behavior.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2016.

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100 Dogs 07
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreria Prado, 70, in her backyard calling for her dogs in a kennel. Prado and her husband estimate they have between 110 and 120 dogs at home. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 08
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, (center) greets some of her many dogs in her backyard. She credits her dogs with helping her overcome depression. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 09
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, cares for a sick dog in her backyard. Medical costs, including having the dogs spayed and neutered, are some of the main expenses involved in taking care of the dogs. Some of the expenses are covered by the couple's pension, while others are covered by donations.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2016.

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100 Dogs 10
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, followed by some of her over 100 dogs as she cleans up after them. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2016.

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100 Dogs 11
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, plays with some of his dogs in his backyard. Prado says they go through over 400 kg (880 lbs) of dog food per month. Much of the food is donated, while the rest of it, along with other expenses are covered by the couple's pensions. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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100 Dogs 12
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

A dogs world in Edina Ferreira Prado's backyard. Her and her husband take it upon themselves to adopt stray animals from their community. In all, they have over 100 dogs at home. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2016.

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100 Dogs 13
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, (center) inspect a puppy that is about to be adopted for ticks and diseases. She
also screens the owners to ensure they will treat the animals well. The organizationshe volunteers for, Resgate de Animais, even visits people's homes to double check that the adopting owners are not somehow harmful to the dogs.
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015.

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100 Dogs 14
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, (center) looks on as his wife, Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, picks off a tick from a puppy that is about to be adopted. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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100 Dogs 15
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, nearly in tears as she gives a puppy away for adoption. Prado said she always fears new owners will mistreat them.

While Prado initially intended to keep the dogs she shelters, their numbers have grown so large that she puts many of them up for adoption. Every Saturday she takes around 10-15 of her dogs to an event to have them adopted. She tries to only give away dogs who have stayed with her for a short time.
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 16
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

One of Edina Ferreira Prado's many dogs clamors for attention. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015.

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100 Dogs 17
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, removes ticks from one of her many dogs. Prado expressed frustatrion that people don't spay and neuter their dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015

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100 Dogs 18
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, and his wife, Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, walk though a hall in their home. "What is our purpose on Earth?" Mrs. Prado asked. To leave it better than we found it. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015.

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100 Dogs 19
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, in her yard and with some of her over 100 dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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Waiting for Tomorrow: Restless but no...
São Gonçalo - RJ,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
02 Mar 2015

Landless workers occupied an abandoned lot outside Rio de Janeiro to protest a lack of public housing.

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'Weavers of the Sky:' Peru's Handwove...
Chinchero, Peru
By Marta Tucci
29 Dec 2014

Traditional handwoven fabrics embody the living history and culture of the Peruvian highlands. Textile patterns with expressive names such as Mayu Qenqo (meandering river) or Pumac Makin (puma footprints) tell tales of the geography and events of the Andean region and its history over thousands of years. 

Up to this day, Quechuan communities from the highlands have been the keepers of culture and sustainers of an ancient yet difficult lifestyle in absolute synchronicity with the Peruvian earth, the Pachamama. These weaving traditions date back to pre-Columbian civilisations, and continue to be of great importance as living symbols of indigenous cultural identity. 

The region of Chinchero (3780 meters) in the province of Urubamba, is home to several Quechua communities. While men farm the land and harvest potatoes, barley and quinoa to feed their families and sell at nearby markets, women raise llamas and alpacas for yarn, spin on drop spindles, and weave cloth on backstrap looms while tending to their flock, or letting food cook over a fire, just as their forebears had done before them. 

While Chinchero has traditionally relied on farming for financial sustainability, demographic and social changes over time have had a detrimental effect on these communities on several levels. Competition with large agricultural corporations means that local farmers can no longer rely on farming to financially support their families, and women who would traditionally weave based on their family’s needs increased their production to sell in local markets. 

By the 1970s, as a result of the exponential growth of tourism in the Sacred Valley brought along mainly by the popularity of Machu Picchu, local traditional weavers started to change their production, using aniline dyes instead of natural ones and making simple patterns on more homogenised non-traditional fabrics to keep up with the increasing demand of tourism. These new textile designs no longer reflected the ancient weaving traditions of these communities, and much of their history, culture and identity has been at risk of being lost and forgotten. 

In some of the less transited areas of the highlands however, some small local communities still preserve their traditional and noble way of life despite the increasing difficulties they face, from farming the land, to weaving the sky, passing down their knowledge from older to younger generations, hopefully for many years to come. 

Weavers of the Sky documents the work of a group of Andean women from the community of Piuray who up to this day preserve the ancient weaving traditions of their ancestors. 

FULL ARTICLE UPON REQUEST

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Child Labor in Venezuela's Andes
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

Pueblo Llano is at 800 km from Caracas, Venezuela's capital. This little town inside Los Andes is the main potatoes and carrot producer in the country. However, and despite the successful market with multinational companies like Frito-Lay as one the biggest clients, Pueblo Llano have deep social issues interconnected between them, child labor and high suicide rates.
Their main job is to plant and care for the crops of potatoes and carrots, using several toxic pesticides most of them prohibited by international laws. The landlord provides them with a precarious home, food and a US$ 1 daily salary. At harvest time, they make money depending on how many bags (of 70 Kg each) can be filled and carried down from the steep mountains.
The isolation of the town and the hard market between farmers make this town a place for avarice, most of the children from 9 to 13 years old leave the school and begin to work on the fields dreaming about making tons of money, however, the harvest not always become as they expected and, in some cases, they took their own lives away as the easiest exit.

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child labor in venezuela 04
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

A 14 year old boy carry a 70 Kg bag of carrots in the field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 09
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers between 12 and 19 years old work on a carrots harvest in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 10
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

Gerson is 17, he came from Colombia at the age of 12 to work in Pueblo Llano. Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 12
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

The hands of workers after a day of work on a carrots harvest. Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.