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Tamarod - The "Rebellion" against Morsi
Cairo, Egypt
By zeer news
17 May 2013

Tamarod (Rebellion), is an Egyptian campaign launched by a coalition of groups and movements of the civil society to demand the resignation of President Morsi.
Whenever confronted with critics, waves of protests and clashes, the Muslim Brotherhood constantly repeats that Morsi was democratically elected by more than 13 million people. Thus, Tamarod aims to collect by the end of June, 15 million signatures of people who are asking for Morsi's resignations and early elections.
The initiative - highly symbolic since it has no legal basis in the Egyptian constitution - is gaining ground thanks to the volunteers who are copying and distributing the forms everywhere in the country.

The video is 2 minutes and 18 seconds long and it features interviews and images of people signing the petition.

SHOT LIST
1- woman stopping taxis to give them the form, telling them "It's against Morsi"
2- interview in english with a volunteer. "The goal of Tamarod... we want to explain that we refuse the Muslim Brotherhood regime and Morsi as well"
3- woman distributing the form. Two women walk past saying "We don't want him (Morsi)"
4- interview with second female volunteer. "We are collecting 15 millions petitions... 15 Million petitions, to tell the public opinion in Europe and in Egypt that Morsi has to resign".
5- Three shots of the second volunteer collecting signatures and showing the papers.
6- close shot of woman holding the "Tamarod" petition. In the background we can hear demonstrators saying "we want the fall of the regime"
7- Eight shots of people signing forms. One guy waiting for a man to take a picture of him holding the Tamarod petition. Background interview in English with the first volunteer saying "Their excuse is that Morsi received 15 million votes, so we are trying to show them that more than this number refuses the Muslim Brotherhood. This is not just from Cairo, but also a lot of states (governorates) like Alexandria, Suez as well, Port Said and some cities in Upper Egypt"
8- volunteer talking to a man at intersection, while another man on a motorcycle reads the Tamarod papers
9- Interview in arabic with young volunteer from Alexandria. "The next 30 of June we will have collected 15 million requests or more...."
10- Young volunteers stopping cars to distribute the petition in Mohamed Mahmoud Street. The interview continues in the background "The government of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) and the one of Morsi, the present government of the Muslim Brotherhood, did not break with the past, with Mubarak. The government of Morsi and that of Mubarak are the same". "For this reason the Egyptian people are returning again to the streets, to the square (Tahrir), to let Morsi and his group know "we don't want you!"
11- shots of women chanting in Tahrir square. "A new revolution in the square" and "down with Morsi"
12- interview in arabic with second volunteer "we don't want Mubarak or Morsi. We want young people, people from here, from Tahrir"
13- Woman with three children holding the "Tamarod signs" and singing "Erhal (Leave)"

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Africa's disappearing forests
Lambarene, Gabon
By serengeti1 serengeti1
16 May 2013

Africa’s forests are disappearing at an alarming rate. Loggers and farmers have cleared most of Africa’s frontiers forests. West Africa only has 10% of its original forests left. Despite having 530 million hectares of forest, Africa is one of the world’s continents with the lowest cover rate. Africa cannot afford to lose its forest cover, yet only a few large blocks of intact natural forest still remain.

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Hundreds of signatures on rebel state...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
16 May 2013

Activists in Egypt collected hundreds of signatures for a rebel statement campaign from Egyptian citizens against Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi and Muslim brotherhood.

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CITIZENS OF A DEAD CITY
Cairo, Egypt
By serengeti1 serengeti1
15 May 2013

The world understands the value of the pyramids, the sphynx. Cairo today is a bustling world city at the receiving end of the so called Arab Spring - a collective cry from the people of Egypt for a better future. But where are the voices of the people living on the fringes of Egytian society, people like the half a million "citizens" of The City of the Dead -- a massive cemetary in the heart of Cairo.
At a time when journalists were banned from el Arafa, this video crew slipped into the cemetary and managed to get a snapshot of lives being lived among the dead of Cairo.

For understandable reasons no one in this piece can be identified. I promised to respect their wishes. Clients are welcome to use nom-de plumes wherever they wish.

BACKGROUND TO THE PIECE
(NOTE: CLIENT SHOULD SUPPLY LATEST TAHRIR SQUARE CIVIL UNREST FOOTAGE) At a time of ongoing political unrest and turmoil, when thousands Egyptians fill Tahrir Square in search of political stability and economic freedom, there is a dark side to Cairo’s social order. It’s a side of Cairo life seldom exposed to the outside world. Few people in Cairo speak of it. It’s a subject never brought up in polite conversation, or over dinner tables. It’s part of Cairo’s national buried conscience, a collective embarrassment, if you will.
It’ s the City of the Dead, el Arafa, also called Qarafa by the Cairenes – the people of Cairo. This four mile (6.4k,) long necropolis (cemetery)with its dense tomb and mausoleum structures, below the Mokattam hills in south eastern Cairo is home to over 500 000 people who live and work among the dead. Some are refugees from other parts of Egypt, from the earth quake of 1992, or from city demolitions and urban renewal programs. Some want to be near their loved ones, recent or ancient relatives. The poorest live in the City of the Dead slum, locally known as Manshiyat naser, also known as Garbage City. During the time of Mubarrak, foreign journalists were expelled if they reported on el Arafa. They were warned to pay no attention to the City of the Dead if they ever wanted to return to Egypt.
But today, many of those marching for a better future on Tahrir Square come from Qarafa. Here, among the tombs and the sarcophagi and mausoleums, children are born, people cry, laugh, and live their extraordinary invisible lives. High rent and rampant unemployment in Cairo have forced people into the cemetery. The majority of these citizens of el Arafa are Muslims, but there are a few scattered Christian families as well.
Many of the tombs are house-like: a tradition that stems from ancient Egypt. What cuts these people off from the rest of Cairo – and also adds to the mystique of the place - are massive walls that surrounds the “city” on all four sides. Some tombs are very old but people are still buried there ever day. There are two separate rooms for men and women in most of the tombs; before the funeral , people are interred in an opening in the ground in the basement of the tomb and covered by a stone slab. During the funeral the stone slab is removed and the body is placed on a shelf...which concludes the internment process.
Access to the City of the Dead is not easy. The “citizens” generally don’t like tourists or cameras and are as a rule not very welcoming to strangers. This crew managed to get special permission from the locals to film in the City of the Dead only for four hours one night. We also had to hide from Mubarrak’s police, since it was officially forbidden for foreign journalist to report from the City of the Dead.
Now for the first time, with Mabarrak gone, these images can be shown.

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With Pigs And Blood, Kenyans Protest ...
Nairobi, Kenya
By marukophoto
14 May 2013

KENYAN PROTESTERS LEAVE PIGLETS AT THE PARLIAMENT ENTRANCE

Nairobi, Kenya may 14 2013
SHOT LIST
1. PROTESTERS RALLYING AND PREPARING TO MARCH TO PARLIAMENT, KENYA’S NATIONAL ASSEMBLY (PARLIAMENT)
2. BITE 1: KENYAN ACTIVIST "We are here to defend the constitution against parliamentary greed... We are going to occupy parliament to stop greed and to defend the new constitution."
3. PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
4. PROTESTERS SING AT THE GATE
5. PROTESTERS BRING LIVE PIGLETS AND A LARGE MALE PIG TO THE PARLIAMENT GATES
6. PIGS AND BLOOD AT PARLIAMENT ENTRANCE
7. BITE 2: ROY AWATIS-ENGLISH “Basically is symbolic because what we call them is ‘MPigs’ (Members of Parliament) so what we did, we brought pigs here and we slaughtered them because the point was we are slaughtering them, we slaughtered the pigs and we laid the blood down at the gate and that is very symbolic for MPigs (Members of Parliament) to know that we see what they are doing and we will not accept it.”
8. PIGS
9. PROTEST MARCHING THROUGH NAIROBI STREET
TEXT
Kenyan Civil Society Organizations on Monday staged a protest against a move by MPs to increase their pay perks and allowances.
The anti- MPs’-greed protest was dramatically staged with a drove of piglets herded to the door steps of Kenya’s Parliament to register their concerns over what they see as greed underlying the unsustainable, unaffordable increase in MP salaries.
The protest caught MPs and parliamentary security unawares and drew live piglets and a bigger male one at the Kenyan National Assembly entrance used by Members of Parliaments
Police officers in riot gear watched as the protesters picketed with posters asking MPs to stop their greed for usurping public funds.
The protest comes just days after the new Kenyan President and ICC suspect on crime against Humanity during the 2007/08 post election violence Uhuru Kenyatta added his voice against the greed by MPs to hike their pay and allowances even before earning their first salary.
Kenya’s recent established Salaries and Remuneration Commission has stood firm arguing against the demand by Members of Parliaments saying it is not sustainable.
The commission recommended that Members of National Assembly be paid at US$ 6, 333 while the legislators are demanding US$ 10,119. The National Assembly has 349 MPs while Senate has 67 members bring the total to 416 plus two speakers and two clerks for the two-tiered chambers.
Kenyan members of the Nation assembly are the highest paid in the region.
END

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Suez Canal Development Conference in ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
14 May 2013

Story: Suez Canal Development Conference in Cairo

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: May 13, 2013
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 13, 2013
Length: 00:02:23
Video Size: 117 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Pan left shot of the banner of the conference
  2. Various shots of the conference held at Cairo International Conference Centre
  3. Various shots of attendees at the inauguration of the conference
  4. Medium shot a display showing details about the project
  5. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Dr. Hesham Qandil:
    “This project took into account all the criteria of the national security and all the demands and the remarks of the armed forces. I would like to affirm that the security of this country and the safety of its territories take precedence over any other issue and of course this position include the government, opposition and the Egyptian people as well. We all agree upon this issue (Egypt’s security) and there is no difference among us about that.”
  6. Various shots of attendees during the conference
  7. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – head of International Business & Investment Association (IBIA), Ahmad Galal El-Deen:
    “This conference is not an ordinary event. We are currently in the process of historic event and we hope it would be the development engine in Egypt. We are in the process of international project that will contribute in transferring Egypt to the ranks of the major countries and it will represent a focal point in the international trade.”
  8. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Housing Minister Tarek Wafiq:
    “The law of the project is now in the process of developing some amendments and then sending it from the office of the prime minister to the Shura Council to discuss it.”
  9. Various shots of attendees during the conference

STORYLINE:

International Business & Investment Association (IBIA) in cooperation with the technical secretariat of the Suez Canal axis development project organized on Monday, May 13, the first international conference on the development of the Suez Canal.

The conference held under the auspices of Egyptian Prime Minister Dr. Hisham Qandil. He said the draft law of the Suez Canal development took into account all the criteria of the national security and the armed forces.

The Premier also witnessed the signing of a number of contracts of new projects.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Dr. Hesham Qandil:
“This project took into account all the criteria of the national security and all the demands and the remarks of the armed forces. I would like to affirm that the security of this country and the safety of its territories take precedence over any other issue and of course this position include the government, opposition and the Egyptian people as well. We all agree upon this issue (Egypt’s security) and there is no difference among us about that.”

The conference was attended by a number of army leaders, Chairman of Suez Canal authority, experts, Minister of Planning and International Cooperation, Minister of Housing and Urban Communities and a large number of Egyptian businessmen and Arab investors.

For his part, Housing Minister Tarek Wafiq confirmed that Suez Canal development authority had stressed in its establishment draft law that neither Egyptian nor foreign investors will have the right of possession in Suez Canal Development Corridor projects, noting that this will happen through usufruct right only.

He added that the Suez Canal axis project is the dreaming of Egypt and all Egyptians, it is the future project for new Egypt thus it won’t be accounted by other party or it won’t be monopolized by any opinion.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – head of International Business & Investment Association (IBIA), Ahmad Galal El-Deen:
“This conference is not an ordinary event. We are currently in the process of historic event and we hope it would be the development engine in Egypt. We are in the process of international project that will contribute in transferring Egypt to the ranks of the major countries and it will represent a focal point in the international trade.”

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Housing Minister Tarek Wafiq:
“The law of the project is now in the process of developing some amendments and then sending it from the office of the prime minister to the Shura Council to discuss it.”

The Minister added that Suez Canal region is a part of the sustainable development strategy that will make Egypt an international trade point.

Moreover, the Minster has asserted that the draft law which has finalized is currently exist by Cabinet, it will be sent to Shura Council, many various ministries and sovereign authorities and a number of experts law have participated in the project.

President Mohamed Morsi has called for expediting the implementation steps for the Suez Canal Corridor project in view of its positive effect in supporting the Egyptian economy, luring foreign investments, providing thousands of job opportunities for Egyptians in general and Sinai citizens and the Canal region in particular.

End VCS Item

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Imran Khan's Final Election Rally in ...
Islamabad, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 May 2013

22 year old Amir talks about threats of terrorism to political parties and his thoughts on upcoming elections in Pakistan. Amir was in Islamabad to attend the election rally by Imran Khan's PTI.

The life and property of every Pakistani is in danger, but we have to worry about that, we have to change our Pakistan. We have to keep our next generation in mind.

I am supporting Imran Khan because of policies. If you listen to him he only talks about changing Pakistan’s system, nothing else.

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Imran Khan's Final Election Rally in ...
Islamabad, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 May 2013

Sumair Raza explains why he thinks Imran Khan can take Pakistan on the right track. He also talked about security threats on political parties in Pakistan recently.

"I don’t think there is a security threat and even if there is one, I think, being a PTI supporter, we love Imran Khan and we support Imran Khan for a new Pakistan. I’ll just say this, we have given our hearts to you and we will give our blood to you also my beloved motherland. Imran Khan get well soon, and come to build a new Pakistan. Long live Pakistan, long live Imran Khan."

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Imran Khan's Final Election Rally in ...
Islamabad, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 May 2013

Zahid Hussain talks about a recent accident in which Imran Khan, the chairman of PTI was injured and its impact on election campaign.

"One thing should be very clear, security threats or not, we’ve come out to save our country and we have to save this country of ours. Since the creation of our country, it has been destroyed between dictatorships and democracy.
PPP and Nawaz Sharif have taken their turns in the past, neither of them delivered. Now we have to give a chance to Imran Khan, it should be very clear.

Imran Khan is our captain, he has the capability to lead our country and we hope that he will fulfill his promise.

The recent accident was not intentional at all and it was from God. It was a lifter accident which was overloaded. It was the responsibility of government to make sure there was an ambulance present at the venue.

He is a true leader and true patriot, not some layman so he should have been provided a secure lifter to avoid the accident. He does 4-5 rallies every day he must have been exhausted.

If Imran Khan is given a chance and he becomes a prime minister, you will see Pakistan standing next to USA in next 5 years."

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Imran Khan's Final Election Rally In ...
Islamabad, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
08 May 2013

Interviews sharing the opinions of PTI party supporters and proponents of Imran Khan for the next Prime Minister of Pakistan.

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Moscow May 6th Prisoners Rally
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
07 May 2013

Thousands gathered in Moscow in in support of opposition activists who were arrested at last year's May 6 rally on Bolotnaya Square in a rally during Putin's entrance into office.

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Moscow May 6th Prisoners Rally
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
07 May 2013

Thousands gathered in Moscow in in support of opposition activists who were arrested at last year's May 6 rally on Bolotnaya Square in a rally during Putin's entrance into office.

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LANDMINES AND CHILDREN
QUITO, Angola, Kosovo, The African bush
By serengeti1 serengeti1
05 May 2013

There is one landmine for every 17 children in the world, says UNICEF. This means one landmine for every 52 people in more than 70 countries. This is a link to a riveting story: it's about things that go boom! and children without legs.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (2 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Local residents making the 16-kilogram (35 pounds) leather Lelo Burti ball, tightly stuffed with sawdust and soil and topped with red wine. The "ball-stuffing morning" is punctuated with wine toasts, jokes and various discussions about the game.

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Eating bats is a delicacy in mountain...
Igbaras, Iloilo, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
05 May 2013

Life in the far reaching mountainous areas of Iloilo is hard. Transportation is not widely accessible and people live a simple life. Due to poverty and scarce sources of food, as in older days, people eat bats to survive. Fruit bats are considered a delicacy. Poi bat and Adobong Paniki, deep fried bat with soy sauce, is a thrilling comestible for exotic food lovers.

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Bats, A Delicacy In The Mountainous R...
Igbaras, Iloilo, Philippines
By U.S. Editor
04 May 2013

Igcabuyao, a village in the province of Iloilo in the Philippines, is a three hour car ride from any main city. The terrain is tough, and transportation inaccessible. People often walk several hours to buy food, and frequently live below the poverty line, growing only peanuts to sustain themselves without outside help.
To keep hunger at bay, locals have for generations turned to an unlikely food source: bats. The village of Igcabuyao is located near six major bat caves, an important resource for their survival.

Fruit bats are considered a delicacy in this area.. Poi bat and Adobong Paniki, deep fried bat with soy sauce, are thrilling dishes for exotic food lovers. Today, bats are frequently served as appetizers in wine bars.

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30,000 laborers march on Labor Day
Metro Manila, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
01 May 2013

Around 30,000 militant and labor groups march to Liwasang Bonifacio on May 1, 2013, Labor Day urging the government for salary increases of 125 pesos across the board nationwide.

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Madam Lubna Laal - Transgender Electi...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
30 Apr 2013

Madam Lubna Laal
Transgender Election Candidate
Jhelum, Pakistan
People of Jhelum know me as Madam Lubna Laal.
Because my profession is dancing, visiting homes, dancing in functions and to get paid for this.
I am contesting elections from PP 26 and I’m hopeful that I‘ll be successful.
I was so happy on acceptance of my nomination papers. Everyone around was congratulating including media and lawyers, it made me so happy.
We did not have our Identity cards and society had a very narrow vision about us.
I am campaigning since last 15-20 days.
Response from people has been very good. Poor people like me, youth likes me, women like me and they are appreciating me that I’m taking part in elections.

Rubina Shahid
Housewife
Jhelum, Pakistan
They also should get a chance to take part in elections.
Like everybody else who contests in the election, transgender also have a right to do so.

Lubna:
We also will let people know that we are also human beings.
As you know before this, how people treated us in the society.
That image will be changed because of better educated transgenders.
20-30 years ago, the mentality of people was totally different.
The old perception of people is now changed because of educated people and because of educated candidates.

Mushtaq Ahmad
Shopkeeper, Pakistan
We know Madam Lubna very well she is our neighbor.
We are very happy that she is contesting in elections.
She is better than the people who were contesting before.
We are hopeful that if she succeeds, she’ll be good for us and she will work for us.
She is far much better than previous people.”

Lubna:
The main problem of Pakistan is electricity; this is the main issue we are facing.
We are in favor of eradicating corruption and non-payment of tax.
We are in favor of punishing tax offenders, stop corruption.
That’s how country`s economy will be on right way and our country will flourish.
Otherwise if this system continues by of taking turns of 5 years each. They have already taken four chances and people have lost confidence in them.

Muhammad Razzaq
Shopkeeper
Jhelum, Pakistam
“This is a good sign, everyone has his opinion, If she has taken decision to contest elections then its good. Everybody has the right to contest in elections. This is not a problem, This is a very good sign that they have felt this thing and they are contesting in elections we should support her.”

Lubna:
We have added everything in manifesto regarding transgenders, women, fuel shortage and also have talked about the poor infrastructure.
Also we have planned about the businessmen and we have pledged that justice will be at doorsteps of poor.
I appeal to people to make us successful and give us chance to your represent you in assemblies.

Transcription:

00:00:04:03 – 00:00:07:020
People of Jhelum know me as Madam Lubna Laal.

00:00:08:09 – 00:00:16:01
Because my profession is dancing, visiting homes, dancing in functions and to get paid for this.

00:00:16:13 – 00:00:24:06
I am contesting elections from PP 26 and I’m hopeful that I‘ll be successful.

00:00:24:17 – 00:00:35:22
I was so happy on acceptance of my nomination papers. Everyone around was congratulating including media and lawyers, it made me so happy.

00:00:36:06 – 00:00:40:10
We did not have our Identity cards and society had a very narrow vision about us.

00:00:40:18 – 00:00:43:29
I am campaigning since last 15-20 days.

00:00:44:06 – 00:00:55:24
Response from people has been very good. Poor people like me, youth likes me, women like me and they are appreciating me that I’m taking part in elections.

Rubina Shahid
Housewife
Jhelum, Pakistan

00:00:56:18 – 00:00:59:22
They also should get a chance to take part in elections.

00:00:59:22 – 00:01:02:17
Like everybody else who contests in the election, transgender also have a right to do so.

Lubna

00:01:03:14 – 00:01:09:03
We also will let people know that we are also human beings.

00:01:09:16 – 00:01:13:05
As you know before this, how people treated us in the society.

00:01:13:07 – 00:01:17:03
That image will be changed because of better educated transgenders.

00:01:17:10 – 00:01:28:03
20-30 years ago, the mentality of people was totally different. Now people in general and candidates think its goo that we are contesting.

Mushtaq Ahmad
Shopkeeper, Pakistan

00:01:29:15 – 00:01:32:09
We know Madam Lubna very well she is our neighbor.

00:01:32:10 – 00:01:35:21
We are very happy that she is contesting in elections.

00:01:36:05 – 00:01:39:17
We think she is better than the people who were contesting before.

00:01:39:19 – 00:01:47:17
We are hopeful that if she succeeds, she’ll listen to us, be good for us and she will work for us. She is far much better than previous people.”

Lubna:

00:01:48:03 – 00:01:54:07
The main problem of Pakistan is electricity; this is the main issue we are facing.

00:01:54:55 – 00:01:59:21
We are in favor of eradicating corruption and non-payment of tax.

00:02:02:10 – 00:02:07:14
We are in favor of punishing tax offenders, stop corruption.

00:02:08:01 – 00:02:08:12
Corruption should be eradicated. That’s how country`s economy will be on right way and our country will flourish.

00:02:08:14 – 00:02:29:23
Otherwise if this system continues by of taking turns of 5 years each. They have already taken four chances and people have lost confidence in them.

Muhammad Razzaq
Shopkeeper
Jhelum, Pakistam

00:02:30:03 – 00:02:35:09
“This is a good sign, everyone has his opinion, If she has taken decision to contest elections then its good.

00:02:35:11 – 00:02:44:23
Everybody has the right to contest in elections. This is not a problem, This is a very good sign that they have felt this thing and they are contesting in elections we should support her.”

Lubna:
00:02:44:18 – 00:02:54:24
We have added everything in manifesto regarding transgenders, women, fuel shortage and also have talked about the poor infrastructure.

00:02:55:02 – 00:03:05:06
Also we have planned about the businessmen and we have pledged that justice will be at doorsteps of poor.

00:03:05:14 – 00:03:12:15
I appeal to people to make us successful and give us chance to your represent you in assemblies.

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Leishmania spreads in Syria
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
28 Apr 2013

Leishmania spreads in Syria.
A video report about this disease from the village of Maar Shourin which is located in the countryside of Idleb.

Due to the lack of basic amenities and health care in Syria, Leishmaniasis, a complex disease, has been affecting a large number of the population in Idleb, northern Syria. The disease is transmitted through the a bite of a sandfly, affecting different parts of the body, resulting in sores on the skin and welts. The sores, sometimes, get infected.

Since the basic conditions of the Syrian people is very poor, the disease is most likely to be fatal. Also, regarding the fact that wartime conditions compromise the immune system, this disease is bound to spread quickly.

The medicine required for treatment is scarce in Syria, but the people of Idlib are attempting to assist every infected person without a fee.

It is difficult, at the moment, to assess the number of Leishmaniasis cases in Syria, but the poor conditions showed that the disease will continue transmitting from one person to another.

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A Swiss Tattoo Artist in Nepal
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Apr 2013

A Swiss tattoo artist explains why tattoo is important for him in the 3rd International Tattoo Convention held in Kathmandu.

The convention that was held from April 26 to 28 showcased 70 national and international tattoo artists.

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Aftermath of Car Bomb Outside French ...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
23 Apr 2013

A video showing the aftermath of the car bomb explosion outside the French Embassy, Tripoli.
Security guards and people living nearby have been hospitalised. Eyewitness reports describe a very loud powerful explosion. One resident close to the scene described how they were hurled out of their bed by the blast.

Debris from remains of the car used were found on nearby streets, while forensic experts are still trying to decipher the type of bomb used and who was responsible.

Armoured military vehicles are now guarding the scene.

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Bahraini Clashes
Sitra, Bahrain
By Benjamin Hall
22 Apr 2013

Bahraini protesters clash with riot police in Shiite villages surrounding the capital Manama.

00:00
Young protesters wave the Bahrain flag while yelling "Fall to Hamad" (Hamad being King Hamad Ibn Issa Al Khalifa of Bahrain)

00:15
The crowd is yelling "peaceful protest"

00:25
Security forces throw what appears to be tear gas at protesters.
The crowd is yelling "Allah Akbar (God is Great)"

00:30
The crowd runs from the tear gas

00:48
The protesters are throwing rocks at security forces from behind a wooden barricade.

1:24
The protesters throw what appears to be tear gas canisters back at the security forces.

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Black Bloc Protest Heats Up
Tallat Harb Square, Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
19 Apr 2013

Activists burned a Muslim Brotherhood flag in Tallat Harb square along with thousands of protesters in front of the High Court, against Mohammed Morsi and the Brotherhood.

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Burning Muslim Brotherhood Flag In Ca...
Tallat Harb Square, Cairo, Egypt
By elmasdr
19 Apr 2013

Activists burned a Muslim Brotherhood flag in Tallat Harb square along with thousands of protesters in front of the High Court, against Mohammed Morsi and the Brotherhood.

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Zucchini Protest (5 of 10)
Egypt
By elmasdr
17 Apr 2013

Members of the April 6th Youth Activist Movement sit in solidarity in front of the Egyptian high court protesting the incarceration of three other activist members earlier this April.

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Zucchini Protest (3 of 10)
Egypt
By elmasdr
17 Apr 2013

Members of the April 6th Youth Activist Movement sit in solidarity in front of the Egyptian high court protesting the incarceration of three other activist members earlier this April.

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Zucchini Protest (1 of 10)
Egypt
By elmasdr
16 Apr 2013

Members of the April 6th Youth Activist Movement sit in solidarity as they protest the incarceration of three other activist members earlier this April.

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Zucchini Protest (4 of 10)
Egypt
By elmasdr
16 Apr 2013

Members of the April 6th Youth Activist Movement sit in solidarity in front of the Egyptian high court protesting the incarceration of three other activist members earlier this April.

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Zucchini Protest (2 of 10)
Egypt
By elmasdr
16 Apr 2013

Members of the April 6th Youth Activist Movement sit in solidarity as they protest the incarceration of three other activist members earlier this April.

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Zucchini Protest
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
09 Apr 2013

Members of the April 6th Youth Activist Movement protest the incarceration of three other activist members in front of the Egyptian high court .

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Interrogation of a Policeman by FSA R...
Latakia, Syria
By Idleb Press
08 Apr 2013

A police officer belonging to the Alawite sect that is employed the regime was arrested and apparently tortured by FSA rebels operating in the "kurdish mountains" (Jebel Akrad). The alleged crime he committed was murder in areas that supported the revolutionary factions. The officer confessed to these allegations, as indicated in the video. He mentioned that they were paid 10,000 Syrian Liras for every person that they killed. He said that the initial reason for being mobilized was to quell the civilian demonstrations. In the video he confesses to killing at least 17 people in different regions, saying that this was authorized by Captain Ahmad Abdel Malek.

Transcription:

00 :00-00 :04 S : To oppress demonstrators
00 :05-00 :06 I2 : Come speak now
00 :06-00 :11 We got an order from Ahmad Abdul Malki to oppress the demonstartors
00 :11-00 :13 I1 : And, Where ?
00 :13-00 :16 S : In Menbej in the Arabian Arena
00 :16 – 00 :17 I1 : Why ?
00 :17-00 :19 S : Inorder to opress demonstrators and kill them
00 :20-00 :22 « Inaudible »
00 :22 I2 : How many were you ?
00 : 23 S : Five to six
00 :24-00 :26 : How much did you get paid ?
00 :26-00 :27 : S : We were not paid
00 :27 : I1 : Liar
00 :27-00 :28 : S : We were paid ten
00 :28-00 :29 : I 1 : Ten What ?
00 :29-00 :30 : S : Ten Thousand
00 :30-00 :31 : I 1 : On each one
00 :31 -00 :32 : S :Yes, on every one ten
00 :32-00 :36 : I2 : The day that the demonstration against « inaudible » you went with it you and your fellow soldiers
00 :39-00 :42 : « inaudible »
00 :42-00 :50 : S : There was a demonstration against the citizens (Lijan) Then we went to another demonstration
00 :50 : I1 : Where ?
00 :51-00 :52 : S : Near Al Kabeer mosque
00 :53 : I1 : Where ?
00 :54 : S : Al Kabeer mosque
00 :55 : I1 : Al Kabeer mosque
00 :55-00 :57 : I2 : How many did you kill ?
00 :58 : S : Three I killed alone
00 :59 : I1 : Liar
1 :00 : S : Three
1 :06-1 :10- S : Yes three were killed infront of me the army forces killed as well
1 :10-1 :17 : « Inaudible »
1 :19-1 :22 : I1 : How did Bashar Al Asad benefit you ? How did Bashar Al Asad benefit you ?
1 :22- 1 :24 : S : He didn’t benefit me in any way
1 :24 : I1 : So what ?
1 :24-1 :28 : « inaudible »
1 :30-1 :36 : S : At Al Akeed mosque, there was also approximately six hundred people, I also killed five of them
1 :38-1 :42 : I2 : How many did they become ? Thirteen..
1 :45 : I2 : Other than that
1 :45-1 :50 : « inaudible »
1 :50-1 :53 : S : There is a street named Al Rabita street
1 :53-1 :55 : I1 : Alrabita, Where is this Al Rabita Street ?
1 :56- 1 :57 : S : Minbej
1 :59-2 :00 : I1 : How many did you kill ?
2 :01-2 :03 : S : I killed 4 as well
2 :03-2 :07 : « Inaudible »
2 :08-2 :18: I2 : How many did they become ? They became seventeen. Other than that give us names. Names of security members that came with you. What is the name of your captain ?
2 :19-2 :22 : S : They were three officers
2 :22-2 :25 : « inaudible »
2 :25-2 :31 : S : Abdulwahab Khalaf he was in charge of « inaudible » the center against the opposition. Lieutenant Ali Ahmad he was from Hama, and Sergeant Ahmad El Malki he was the one that ordered us to fire on people

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The Unfortunate Displacement of Refug...
Salamiyah, Syria
By Fady
06 Apr 2013

Since the start of the Syrian clashes, a large number of Syrians have migrated to the city of Al Salmiya, which is located 30 kilometers to the west of the city of Hama. The city of Al Salmiya is considered the capital of the Ismaili sect and therefore is of large importance to Syria and the region.

In the wake of the explosion that targeted the headquarters of the People’s Committee at the end of January and the initial wave of refugees coming from both Hama and Homs, the security in Al Salmiya was tightened. This resulted in further unrest, including the abuse of the refugee population and the destruction of their housing.

Transcription:

00 :02 If we want to discuss the process of displacement to Salameyah, we have to dissect it into two different segments. The first is prior to the bombing that occurred two months ago in the city. The other segment discusses what happened post bombing.

00 :17 The city is hosting approximately 50,000 to 60,000 refugees. As a result, from the influx of refugees, the economy has flourished. The shopkeepers have benefited in a noticeable manner, trade volume has increased, and stores that are in key markets witnessed better work.

00 :35 The first major influx of refugees arrived in Al Salamiyah from Hama. Entire families moved to the area, most of them being women and children. The offensive on Homs brought another wave of refugees to Al Salamiyah larger than that, that came from Hama. After which, the bombing of the People's Committee occurred.

00 :51 The People’s Committee increased it security measures after the bomb detonation. Al Salamiya locals started going to the houses of the refugees, especially to tenants, and beat up some of the masses. They tortured the men and threatened their women and children. They claimed they want to beat and kill them. Furthermore, they shredded their rent contracts so that they no longer have alibis to stay, resulting in the refugees leaving the city of Al Salameyah due to fear and intimidation.

01 :17 The site of the bombings are these residential buildings and the headquarters of the people’s committee that was bombed. Also, this is the house of the head of the area.

01 :36 and this is the sign of the party again (inaudible)

01 :42 It was obvious that the refugees were kicked out due to, both, a security and military decision from the government. The tool to execute it was by the use of the thugs i.e the people’s committee. How ? By pressuring them, by attacking their homes and harassing them on the streets. They would take someones identification card and ask him, "you are from Homs. Whats brings you here?"

02 :00 My siblings were in Al Salamiya, so I moved to the area.

02 :06 I left Homs at the time that the big strike happened

02 : 12 In regards to the bombing that happened here in Al Salamiya, it instilled fear in people. We started hearing people say that they are going to kick us out and to be careful. As a result of that, we did not dare to go out even if we were short on bread. We were afraid to go out and buy bread.

02 :31 These are my kids, and there are my brother's children and the children of my other brother. We guided them to start working. My son who is in sixth grade is working for 100 Syrian pounds in order to finance himself.

02 :46 The refugees have nothing to do with this. We are sheltering women and children, they believed that we are sheltering the women and children of the men that are fighting outside.

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Music Therapy for Autistic Children i...
kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
01 Apr 2013

There is still no official data regarding the numbers of autistic people in Nepal. Unfortunately, it is estimated that the number of autistic children is increasing daily.

Of Nepal’s population of 30 million, a rough estimate shows that 300 thousand people are living with autism, and around 60 to 90 thousand of them are within the spectrum of severe autism.

Autistic children need therapy to improve their understanding and responses. Various treatments such as art therapy, music therapy and occupational therapy have been shown to improve the lives of autistic children.

In this video, Kedar Ghandari, a music therapist, discusses his use of music therapy to help autistic children in Nepal.

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Lagos Black Heritage Festival
Lagos, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
31 Mar 2013

Inspired by the spirit of convergence for which Lagos remains pre-eminent, the Lagos Black Heritage Festival celebrates African creativity within a carnivalesque of traditional and contemporary Dance, Music, Painting and Photo Exposition, Drama, Design and Fashion Display, an International Symposium, Film and Video Fiesta and other artistic and intellectual offerings, both inter-state and international. In a seven-day cultural manifestation during which hundreds of performers will animate the ancient city of Badagry and cosmopolitan Lagos with a passage of the traditional and the modern, Lagos State will welcome thousands of visitors with a feast to engage the mind, entrance the senses and linger in the memory for years to come.
Video information

VIDEO SHOWS:

The Lagos Water Regatta is about water-based cultural sporting and recreational activity was put together to showcase what the various coastal communities have to offer in terms of water sport, cultural beauty and aquatic splendor.

The regatta consist of large fishing boats, ferries, water lightening, barges and other marine vessels adorned with each depicting the social, cultural, traditional folklore's and occupational aspects of the Lagos people.

The second is the LAGOS STREET CARNIVAL - which traditionally rounds up the Festival, preceded by an innovation that enlarges the scope of youth participation in the event with colorful display of art, Dance and talent ant participant from all around the world to witness the event.

SOUNDBITES:
-.Soundbite 1-Otunba Olusegun Jawando.-(male)Chairman Regatta Planning committee. -Soundbite 2-Female dancers -Soundbite 3- Akinlolu Osudonire- Male-Tourist

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

2013 Lagos Heritage Week takes place within an event framework that the Festival has designated The Year of Brazil. After Italy and the Horn of Africa in the series – THE BLACK IN THE MEDITERRANNEAN BLUE - comes the turn of Portugal, once a great European maritime nation, and the first European nation to establish diplomatic relations with an African counterpart – the Benin Kingdom. Alas, this historic encounter between equals would later degenerate into participation in the infamous slave trade, but would also result in the greatest “rainbow” nation in the world – The Republic of Brazil!.

Brazil, inevitably, once a Portuguese colony, became an irresistible magnet to the Festival planners. There, the African identity emotion runs deep, rendered vibrantly in cultural retentions in forms of worship, largely of the orisa of the Yoruba (the candomble), in performance modes, cuisine, language, attire and music. Such was the enthusiasm from Brazil that it became necessary to transform the Festival into a two-part celebration, so as to provide more time for the participation of the Afro-Brazilian Diaspora. To them, the Festival promised the fulfillment of the lifelong dream of homecoming. The second part – October 1-10 may yet prove the largest Diaspora Return since the Black and African Arts Festival in Lagos, 1977, better known as FESTAC 77.

What has now turned into THE YEAR OF BRAZIL was formally launched in December 2012 by the award-winning Thobias de Vai Vai Samba Group. Lagos will not soon forget that uniquely sinuous collaboration of costume and motion at the dedicated Festival venue – Freedom Park. The performance signaled a formal declaration that the Brazilian calendar had been brought forward - on the authority of the Yoruba orisa – A-ase! - thus inaugurating an Afro-Brazilian year that commenced in December 2012. The year now progresses into the Festival’s regular Easter calendar in a feast of Thematic Exhibitions, Dance, Drama, Debates and Spectacles with a special cultural presence by the Afro-Brazilian descendants of Nigeria.

The March events pay homage to the late Afro-Brazilian playwright, painter, revolutionary and senator, Abdias do Nascimento, whose life-long dialogue with the orisa will dominate the exhibition galleries. His spiritual play, SORTILEGE, also takes the stage for the first time in West Africa. Abdias is the most impassioned Brazilian link with the continent in the realm of culture, racial identity and political struggle. Exiled in Nigeria’s Yoruba cradle of humanity, Ile-Ife, for some years during the Brazilian dictatorship, it is only fitting that this radical humanist be brought back to his most memorable place of exile. He remains the dynamic symbol of African affirmation in the face of historic odds, the vitality of her cultures, and the assertiveness of racial identity. Befittingly, his widow Elisa Larkin do Nascimento will flag off the year’s Lecture series with a lecture on Abdias’ life, art and struggle.

The GRAND PARADE OF MASQUERADES, drawn from all corners of Yoruba land, a moving mosaic of colour and motion, ushers in the Festival. The programme dedicates each Festival morning to featuring the O’odua states – the modern offspring of the revered Yoruba ancestor and nation-builder – Oduduwa. This year also introduces a modern brass band, the legacy of the Afro-Brazilian returnees who dominate the area around Campos Square, famous for its surviving Brazilian architecture. The Bariga Kids will inject youthful verve into the general medley of rhythm and motion.

OBA KOSO, the tragic music-drama of the late Duro Ladipo opens a window into the tragic vision of the most talented tragedians of West African traditional theatre. OBA KOSO scored many firsts world wide, but most relevantly, as the first Nigerian dramatic work to tour Brazil. A drama of the rise and fall of an Alaafin of Oyo, inducted into the Yoruba pantheon as Sango, god of lightning and thunder, it had great resonance for the Brazilian spectators whose preservation of the deities of their original home defied all efforts at suppression by their slave masters. On the same theatre bill is the Festival premiere of Wole Oguntokun’s dramatization of a slice of Lagos history in her early colonial throes – OSHODI TAPA – a key historic role player in the colonial encounter between Lagos traditional governance and the imperial sway.
Brazil and Nigeria again meet in the Video and Film sector. Synopsis of Brazilian films will be provided where the reels have no sub-titles. These film encounters are of course primarily for audience enjoyment, but they are also planned to offer alternative ideas – including technical aspiration, to the now increasingly adventurous Nigerian cinema.

VISION of the CHILD – the Children’s Art Competition – features an unusual – but highly topical – theme. The Festival talent scouts have already visited nearly 400 schools – formal and informal - since the Festival’s inauguration in December – and assembled the lucky talents for their final contest, and a date with recognition at the Gala Award Night.

DO YOUR OWN THING means exactly what it says – a platform for individual or group talent/experimentations/creativity etc, culminating in the Final adjudication and prizes. Jugglers, singers, instrumentalists, formal and street poets, illusionists, choreographers, mummers etc are free to showcase their specializations, or indeed any kind of inspired lunacies. At the end of these capers, some Surprise Prizes – and perhaps opportunities from hovering talent scouts?

Festival 2013 also introduces a special feature – a Guest Company. Inaugurating that slot is the Rwandan Dance Company, known for its elegant, levitating display of balletic poise even in numbers dedicated to warriors. While in Nigeria, they will conduct a joint workshop with Nigerian counterparts, instigating perhaps a new dance synthesis in the search for contemporary idioms for African dance expressions.

Such exertions require a base of nurture. And so the Festival will play host to the Afro-Brazilian Food Fair. Nigerians will discover that akare-je is none other than the akara of the Ita Igarawu or Ilesha market and street stalls, or that their Easter moyo and frejon are adaptations that re-entered the continent at the hands of the returnees who made it back to homeland.

Memory forms a critical dimension of the Festival – memory as history formative, as evocations of achievement, but also – as pain and anguish. The dark history of the continent is commemorated and its victims honoured in the solemn FITILA (Oil Lamp) Procession, a reminder of the Slave Era, and the triumph of resilience and survival. Venue: Badagry, beginning with the Point of Embarkation and terminating at the Point of No Return, with traditional rituals and invocations. Heritage Week dedicates this night event to the Rites of Collective Reflection, drawing strength for the present and future.

Festivals do not end on a sombre note. The joyous face of human concourse is displayed along the lagoon that slices across Lagos, winding round some of the newest hotels and restaurants on the island. This is the route along which the WATER REGATTA will light up the lagoon with decorated crafts, fluttering pennants, synchronized paddles, a display of marine skills and ethnic symbols created by cultural groups, labour unions, youth organisations, craft guilds, warrior descendants etc etc., with some floats narrating the histories of the riverine and sea-going communities. The land equivalent of this ‘peacock parade’ – THE LAGOS STREET CARNIVAL - traditionally rounds up the Festival, preceded by an innovation that enlarges the scope of youth participation – The Children’s Street Carnival. A percussive medley of voices, instruments and pounding feet take to the streets along a designated route that begins from Awolowo Road and ends in Tafawa Balewa square with the crowning of the Pageant Beauty Queen.

Once again, Lagos opens her arms to men, women and children of all races, histories, and cultures, in her mission to animate the past, celebrate the present, and illuminate the future.

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Syrian Opposition Group Attacks a Car...
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
25 Mar 2013

A Cargo plane transporting supplies for the Syrian regime was attacked by opposition anti aircraft weaponry which led to the crash of the plane. The weaponry is owned by the North Free Brigade a faction of the Free Syrian Army, the action took place in the battle of "Qminas Free" which was located near the Qarmeed camp in the countryside of Idleb.

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Ritual Exhumation -Ifugao, Philippines
Ifugao, Philippines
By U.S. Editor
19 Mar 2013

Bogwa is an ancient ritual in Ifugao, Philippines where natives in Kiangan, Asipulo, Banaue, Lagawe, Hingyon, and Hungduan exhume their death as a form of love and respect to their departed relatives. They feast, celebrate, and offer prayers to the dead for three days.

Although most Ifuagonos have converted to Christianity, they still practice this ritual taboo and incorporate Christian songs and prayers during “Bogwa”.

On the first day of "Bogwa", a Mumbaki (priest) will offer a prayer and a ritual asking the spirits to allow them to open the tomb of the dead.

After opening the tomb, a group of men are now ready to exhume the dead body and clean its 246 bones tediously . The men remove the garments and decaying flesh of the dead with their bare hands.

After cleaning the bones, they bury the decaying flesh near the tomb and sundry the cleaned bones. Next they wrap the skeleton's bones with white cloth and place native Ifugao garments over the white cloth.They will lay the wrapped bones in the favorite area of their beloved where they will pray and sing Christian songs for 3 days.

All people who wish to join the celebration are welcome. The family who is celebrating this unusual day are required to butcher pigs every day to feed all the visitors and on the last day they must also butcher a carabao.

A new coffin is made for the wrapped bones.

Before returning the dead to his tomb, a closing prayer and ritual is done and family members are asked to throw stones inside the tomb and make wishes to the spirits of their departed loved ones.

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Ritual Exhumation -Ifugao, Philippine...
Ifugao, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
19 Mar 2013

Bogwa is an ancient ritual in Ifugao, Philippines where natives in Kiangan, Asipulo, Banaue, Lagawe, Hingyon, and Hungduan exhume their death as a form of love and respect to their departed relatives. They feast, celebrate, and offer prayers to the dead for three days.

Although most Ifuagonos have converted to Christianity, they still practice this ritual taboo and incorporate Christian songs and prayers during “Bogwa”.

On the first day of "Bogwa", a Mumbaki (priest) will offer a prayer and a ritual asking the spirits to allow them to open the tomb of the dead.

After opening the tomb, a group of men are now ready to exhume the dead body and clean its 246 bones tediously . The men remove the garments and decaying flesh of the dead with their bare hands.

After cleaning the bones, they bury the decaying flesh near the tomb and sundry the cleaned bones. Next they wrap the skeleton's bones with white cloth and place native Ifugao garments over the white cloth.They will lay the wrapped bones in the favorite area of their beloved where they will pray and sing Christian songs for 3 days.

All people who wish to join the celebration are welcome. The family who is celebrating this unusual day are required to butcher pigs every day to feed all the visitors and on the last day they must also butcher a carabao.

A new coffin is made for the wrapped bones.

Before returning the dead to his tomb, a closing prayer and ritual is done and family members are asked to throw stones inside the tomb and make wishes to the spirits of their departed loved ones.

Frame 0004
Ritual Exhumation -Ifugao, Philippine...
Ifugao, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
19 Mar 2013

Bogwa is an ancient ritual in Ifugao where natives in Kiangan, Asipulo, Banaue, Lagawe, Hingyon and Hungduan exhume their death as form of love and respect to their departed family members and relatives. They feast, celebrate and offer prayers to the dead for three days…

Despite Christianity had penetrated the sacred mountains of Ifugao and most Ifugaonons are converted to this dominating religion in the Philippines, they still practice this taboo and bizarre ritual and incorporate Christian songs and prayers during the “Bogwa”.

Bogwa is an ancient ritual in Ifugao, Philippines where natives in Kiangan, Asipulo, Banaue, Lagawe, Hingyon, and Hungduan exhume their death as a form of love and respect to their departed relatives. They feast, celebrate, and offer prayers to the dead for three days.

Although most Ifuagonos have converted to Christianity, they still practice this ritual taboo and incorporate Christian songs and prayers during “Bogwa”.

On the first day of "Bogwa", a Mumbaki (priest) will offer a prayer and a ritual asking the spirits to allow them to open the tomb of the dead.

After opening the tomb, a group of men are now ready to exhume the dead body and clean its 246 bones tediously . The men remove the garments and decaying flesh of the dead with their bare hands.

After cleaning the bones, they bury the decaying flesh near the tomb and sundry the cleaned bones. Next they wrap the skeleton's bones with white cloth and place native Ifugao garments over the white cloth.They will lay the wrapped bones in the favorite area of their beloved where they will pray and sing Christian songs for 3 days.

All people who wish to join the celebration are welcome. The family who is celebrating this unusual day are required to butcher pigs every day to feed all the visitors and on the last day they must also butcher a carabao.

A new coffin is made for the wrapped bones.

Before returning the dead to his tomb, a closing prayer and ritual is done and family members are asked to throw stones inside the tomb and make wishes to the spirits of their departed loved ones.