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Dandora Dumpsite 3
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

Another group of waste pickers, most of them coming from the surrounding slums of Dandora and Korogocho, strives to collect as much recyclable garbage as they can, for they will only be paid by weight. They usually get 2Ksh (less than 0.02 Euros) per kilo of glass and 24 Ksh (around 0.2 Euros) per kilo of plastic and therefore in a good day they can make up to 300Ksh or 400Ksh.

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Dandora Dumpsite 2
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

Esther Muthoni, age 62, takes a break after working uninterruptedly for almost four hours. She has been going to the dumpsite since her husband passed away and left her without any income source. Although she doesn’t know how to read, she likes to look at the pictures of her book over and over again.

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Dandora Dumpsite 4
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

A man scavenges for scrap metal, one of the most coveted things in the Dandora dumpsite due to its high prices. The easiest way to find it is burning the garbage, which usually expose the waste pickers to the poisonous smoke emanating from the heaps of rubbish.

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Dandora Dumpsite 5
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

Hundreds of storks overfly the dumpsite looking for leftovers. The last attempt made by the City Council to move the Dandora dumpsite to another location failed because the new location was nearby the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and the huge presence of these birds could have caused security problems with the air traffic.

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Dandora Dumpsite 6
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

Two trucks full of garbage head to the dumpsite through the main access road. Around 200 trucks, loaded with an average of between 4 and 5 tons of rubbish, come every day and pay 100Ksh (0.9 Euros) per ton to the City Council.

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Dandora Dumpsite 8
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

A man waits near the Nairobi River, which flows along the east side of the dumpsite, for the burning garbage to be completely consumed and collect the remaining scrap metal. This process generates toxic fumes and pollutes the river, significantly increasing the risk of airborne and waterborne diseases both for the waste pickers and for the neighbours.

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Dandora Dumpsite 11
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

Three boys await the arrival of the garbage trucks coming from the Hilton Nairobi and other luxury hotels to search for some leftovers. Even though children are not supposed to be allowed in the dumpsite, many street boys sneak in at sunset and try to get something to eat before the sun goes down.

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Dandora Dumpsite 12
Nairobi, Kenya
By Xavi Fernândez de Castro
15 Aug 2013

A bulldozer stirs the garbage to facilitate the search of all the waste dumped in the rubbish tip. The waste pickers follow it and comb the cleared area to collect anything of value.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 4
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps) prepares a shot of an alcoholic drink during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 9
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a man who selects stones from the mine dumps) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

17 January 2013. La Rinconada: "Pallaqueras" (women who select stones from the mine dumps) eat and rest outside their huts during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.
La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there.
Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.
Photo by Albert González Farran.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 1
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) takes a rest outside her shelter in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 10
La Rinconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
29 Sep 2009

Pallaqueras (women who select stones from the mine mines looking for remains of gold) are pictured during their work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 27
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
29 Sep 2009

Engineer Wilfredo Menéndez shows a piece of gold in his office in the headquarters of Corporación Minera Ananea, the company that owns all goldmines in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 10
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
29 Sep 2009

29 September 2009. Pallaqueras (women who select stones from the mine mines looking for remains of gold) are pictured during their work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.