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Thousands Queue Amidst Fuel Shortage ...
Sanaa
By assamawy
03 Apr 2015

The impact of the ongoing war on Yemen's people has now begun to appear in the form of extremely long lines outside of gas stations. Sana'a, which has around 3m people, has suffered from fuel shortages for several months out of the past year. People not only use fuel for cars, but also for home generators since the country has no stable electricity and electricity cuts can last for more than 12 hours a day. As such, people depend mainly on personal generators to lighten the dark nights. Though expensive, the people of Yemeni have no other options.

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Controversial Dam Project Threatens P...
Janna
By Suzanne Baaklini
18 Feb 2015

Nahr Ibrahim, Lebanon

Febraury 9, 2015

The construction of a dam in the area of Janna, Lebanon, is causing wide controversy among local residents, ecologists and even certain politicians. Janna, whose name means ‘paradise’ in Arabic, is a picturesque valley near Ibrahim River in north Lebanon, which hosts a rare ecosystem according to ecologists. Concerned Lebanese fear that this project will ruin the natural site without succeeding in retaining water. Geologist Samir Zaatiti warns that the surface on which the dam is being built covers large pits that absorb water. There are also fears that the project might threaten the water source that feeds the Jeita Grotto, a submerged cave known as a tourist destination. Preparations for the construction have started and many trees in the areas have been cleared. Despite its rich water resources, Lebanon has struggled with a water distribution crisis due to the lack of adequate infrastructure.

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Thailand: A Solar-Powered Path to Dev...
Mae Sot, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
09 Dec 2014

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

Access to electricity is a key element in development. However, in Thailand there is an important gap in access to energy between rich and poor that has persisted over the years, especially in rural areas. The situation is critical in some marginal areas, such as the Thai-Burma border.

The lack of electricity makes these communities more vulnerable. In these areas, some villagers depend on candles or kerosene lamps that are very expensive and have a negative impact on their health. They also pose serious risks to their livelihoods since their homes are usually constructed with bamboo and dried leaves that can easily catch fire. On the other hand, these communities must gather wood in order to satisfy their most basic needs, tasks that are normally carried out by women, cutting into the time and energy they could devote to other economic activities. Moreover, some schools and hospitals do not have access to power for needs as basic as keeping vaccines refrigerated.

The Thai government implemented solar energy systems in more than 200.000 households in 2004. However, most of the systems died because of the lack of maintenance. In this context, a Thai woman founded an organization to refurbish the old equipment and to train local people on how to maintain it. Her project aims to be self-sustainable. If successful, it could bring some much needed relief to families who currently struggle to meet their energy needs.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 22
Montevideo, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
25 Jan 2014

"La Murga" is a musical dance theater genre performed in Uruguay during the Carnival season. It comes from a spanish tradition brought to Latin America hundreds of years ago. The main themes revolve around the salient events of the year, a source of strong political and social criticism. With a carnivalesque-mood, "La Murga" espouses protest and freedom through satire and humorous mockery of power.

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Alternative Electricity in Aleppo
شارع السليمانية, حي السليمانيه, Aleppo, Mount Simeon, Aleppo Governorate, Syria
By Mhammad Darwish
01 Nov 2013

Aleppo, Syria
November 2013

As a result of a power shortage, residents of rebel-held parts of Aleppo have resorted to buying electricity from local providers, who operate large generators. Video includes an interview with a generator owner, shots of generators and makeshift electric grids, as well as general scenes from the streets of Aleppo.

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Protesters in Tahrir Square
Cairo, Egypt
By Yasmin Al Tellawy
15 Jul 2013

Protesters in Tahrir square share their feelings about Morsi and happiness for their country with him no longer in power.

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Tahrir Square, July 3 (12 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Mat Wolf
04 Jul 2013

Crowds in Giza marching to Tahrir Square celebrate the arrival of security forces shortly after the Egyptian military's 48-hour ultimatum for President M0hammed Morsi to share power has expired on July 3, 2013.

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Kudankulam 15
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
16 Apr 2013

Portrait of S Paramaartha Lingam (78), father of PMANE (People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy) leader S.P Udaykumar photographed at Udaykumar’s house in Nagercoil, Tamil Nadu. Meera Udaykumar, wife of S.P Udaykumar says that life is made difficult for the families of the leaders of the movement. Owing to more than 200 police cases levied on S.P Udaykumar and other leaders, they had been unable to travel out of Idinthakarai (for fear of being arrested), the epicenter of the anti-nuclear protests, for more than a year. Their families, meanwhile lived in small towns outside.

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Kudankulam 13
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
16 Apr 2013

M Pushparayan Victoria, convener of PMANE (People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy) is seen talking over the phone while the R.S Mugilan (environmental activist and PMANE’s legal advisor, seen on left) and the parish priest of the church at Koothankuli, a village near the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP), has lunch at the parish house. Pushparayan who has fought for coastal issues in Tamil Nadu for more than two decades was integral in mobilizing protests in the fishing villages near the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) owing to his popularity in the area as an ex-parish priest. He claims that his privacy is often breached by government agencies and his family had been harassed owing to his role as a leader in the anti-nuclear protests.

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Kudankulam 14
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

A priest is seen working in the computer room of the Parish house in Idinthakarai. The epicenter of the protests against the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) is the Lourde Mary Church at Idinthakarai, 6km away from the power plant. The church and its priests have been vital in garnering support and popularity for the anti nuclear protests in this Christian-dominated fishing community. The parish is equipped with a robust internet connection and a functional computer which makes sure that the movement and its people are not forgotten in this fast paced world. Press releases complete with pictures and Facebook updates are dutifully sent out. PMANE (People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy) is headquartered here.

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Kudankulam 7
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

Children look at the graffiti created by supporters of the anti-nuclear movement in Idinthakarai. Prominent figures from the scientific, human rights activists community, film makers etc., has expressed their support to the movement. One of them being Dr. A Gopalakrishnan, retired chief of Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). The AERB is responsible for ensuring the safety and feasibility of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP).

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Kudankulam 8
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

Detail of a boat docked at Idinthakarai, a village 6km away from the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). The village took the center stage in the anti nuclear protests when PMANE (People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy) set up shop there in 2011.

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Kudankulam 11
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

People pray on their knees at a grotto housing a replica of the Pieta at the Lourde Mary Church at Idinthakarai, 6km away from the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). The epicenter of the protests against the power plant is the church and its priests have been vital in garnering support and popularity for the anti nuclear protests in this Christian-dominated fishing community.

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Kudankulam 10
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

General view of a street in Idinthakarai, a village near the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). The villages along the coast of the Gulf of Mannar, where the power plant is situated, has been protesting the commissioning of the plant owing to fears about its safety. There are (an estimated) one million people living within 30km radius of the power plant which is against the stipulated safety rules of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India. According to M Pushparayan, convenor of PMANE (People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy), the villagers have received little or no safety-training in the event of a disaster.

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Kudankulam 5
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

Boats dock at the Idinthakarai village, 6km away from the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). The village is the headquarters for People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy (PMANE), the NGO that has been spearheading the anti-nuclear protests in the region. The fact that there is only one entry point to the village, which is closely guarded by the villagers, coupled with rumours about the villagers being armed with crude bombs, mean the police are reluctant to enter this zone. Thereby protecting the protestors from hostile government agencies. The flip side is that the leaders holed up here might never get a chance to leave.

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Kudankulam 3
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

View of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) as seen from Idinthakarai village. The KKNPP had been mired in controversies since its inception in 1988. Although four nuclear reactors were commissioned in 2008 in addition to the two reactors commissioned earlier, currently only one reactor (Unit I, 1000MW capacity) is operational (since July 13, 2013) and Unit II is still under construction.

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Kudankulam 17
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

A man walks along the beach in Idinthakarai. Seen in the background is the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). The KKNPP had been mired in controversies since its inception in 1988. Although four nuclear reactors were commissioned in 2008 in addition to the two reactors commissioned earlier, currently only one reactor (Unit I, 1000MW capacity) is operational (since July 13, 2013) and Unit II is still under construction. While the state of Tamil Nadu is still suffering from an energy deficit of 34.1% in 2013, the villagers feel that the state and the country has alienated their interests and has ignored their safety concerns.

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Kudankulam 6
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

Men make fishing nets by the beach in Idinthakarai village, 6km away from the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). The fishermen fear that their livelihood would be hampered by the effluents released into the sea by the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant which could potentially destroy marine life.

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Kudankulam 9
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
14 Apr 2013

A religious sign is seen on the door of a fishermen’s shack in Idinthakarai. The epicenter of the protests against the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) is the Lourde Mary Church at Idinthakarai, 6km away from the power plant. The church and its priests have been vital in garnering support and popularity for the anti nuclear protests in this Christian-dominated fishing community.

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Kudankulam 4
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
13 Apr 2013

A local fisherman is seen resting on his rudimentary boat near Idinthakarai - a fishing village with a population of 12,000. The fishermen fear that their livelihood would be hampered by the effluents released into the sea by the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant which could potentially destroy marine life.

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Kudankulam 12
Kudankulam, India
By Jyothy Karat
12 Mar 2013

People gather at Idinthakarai, 6km away from the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) to commemorate the 2nd anniversary of Fukushima disaster, March 11,2013. The anti-nuclear protests in the region has largely been peaceful and is led by the women. The movement is funded by the villagers themselves, for which the men has to go out to the sea for work every day. The women gather in front of the Lourde Mary Church at Idinthakarai daily, in silent protest. Organised protests erupted in the region in the wake of the Fukushima disaster in 2011. The Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) has done little to assuage the fears of the local fishing communities of a similar disaster; while memories of the Tsunami hit in 2004 are still fresh in the minds of the locals.

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Kudankulam 2
Kudankulam
By Jyothy Karat
11 Mar 2013

700 boats and around 5000 villagers lay seige at the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant on the occasion of 2nd anniversary of Fukushima disaster, March 11,2013, Koodankulam. Organised protests erupted in the region in the wake of the Fukushima disaster in 2011. The Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) has done little to assuage the fears of the local fishing communities of a similar disaster; while memories of the Tsunami hit in 2004 are still fresh in the minds of the locals.

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Kudankulam 1
Kudankulam,
By Jyothy Karat
11 Mar 2013

700 boats and around 5,000 villagers lay seige at the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant on the occasion of 2nd anniversary of Fukushima disaster, March 11,2013, Koodankulam. Organised protests erupted in the region in the wake of the Fukushima disaster in 2011. The Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) has done little to assuage the fears of the local fishing communities of a similar disaster; while memories of the Tsunami hit in 2004 are still fresh in the minds of the locals.

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Anti-nuclear protest.
Taipei, Taiwan
By CraigFergusonImages
10 Mar 2013

Pastors from Taiwan's Presbyterian Church have long been politically active. They are protesting nuclear power in Taipei.

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Electrical Generator
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A local Lebanese family starts the generator that provides their electricity. Even in winter most homes are without constant electrical power.

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Young Girl Invents a Urine Powered Ge...
Lagos, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
23 Jan 2013

Journalist:
Taiwo Adeleke

CUE:
Fourteen years old Nigeria girl created a generator that produces electricity for six hours using a single liter of urine as fuel .

Headline:
Girl power generator with urine in Nigeria.

SLUG:
RAW-NIGERIA-ELECTRICITY-GENERATOR-:

Byline:
Taiwo Adeleke / --

SYNTHE:
Duro-Aina Adebola (Female), Urine power Generator initiator (Student)
Omotayo Fakinlede(Male), Professor of Engineering
Olatuji Araoye (Male), Engineer
Patrick Uloba (Male) Teacher.
SHOTLIST:
LAGOS, NIGERIA, JANUARY 2013
VAR of student starting the Generator.
VAR of cylinder and filters
VAR of bulb and socket with electricity
VAR of students talking
VAR of School University
VAR of Man in the Office
VAR of Lagos Street at Night
VAR of man starting generator
VAR of generator sounds
VAR of secondary school building
VAR of teacher with student in the classroom

SOUNDBITE 1, Duro-Aina Adebola (Female), Urine power Generator initiator (Student) (English, 00:14:18 seconds ):
"I got the idea when i went on net and i saw a family of five (5) killed by carbon-monoxide poison. its now stroke me that people are dying regularly from generator poison and that what could be done that wouldn't releases any harmful gases into the environment . Urine is a waste material definitely Nigerians will opt for urine since is a waste material, Nigerians like cheap things "

SOUNDBITE 2, Omotayo Fakinlede(Male), Professor of Engineering (English. 14:01 seconds)
"we can view hydrogen as the hydro carbon minus the carbon. There are very good properties that its as one of the most important thing is the environmental friendliness".

SOUNDBITE 3, Olatuji Araoye (Male), Engineer (English 10:18 seconds).
"Its depend on the cost of the generator first and i will look at the durability at the same time".

SOUNDBITE 4, Patrick Uloba (Male) Teacher.(English 20:18 seconds)
"We have done several other project before this, we are hoping that with the volume of information that as gone out on this project, we are trusting that somebody will come and pick up this project , so that it can be mass produce and it can be there in the market.

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New York Blackout Continues (9 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
02 Nov 2012

A policeman directs otherwise anarchic traffic on First Avenue and 20th Street as stop lights sit dark for miles. Pedestrians cross at great risk as grid workers struggle to try and restore power to huge swaths of the city.

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New York Blackout Continues (10 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
02 Nov 2012

A policeman directs otherwise anarchic traffic on First Avenue and 20th Street as stop lights sit dark for miles. Pedestrians cross at great risk as grid workers struggle to try and restore power to huge swaths of the city.

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New York Blackout Continues (4 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
01 Nov 2012

The city’s gasoline crisis has now become a paramount issue in the post-Sandy recovery. Not only are fuel supplies low or totally out but there is not electricity to power petrol stations. BP, Broadway and Lafayette (the former landmark Gaseteria).

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New York Blackout Continues (5 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
01 Nov 2012

Virtually all businesses south of 34th Street in Manhattan remained shut as the blackout continued into its fifth day.

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New York Blackout Continues (7 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
01 Nov 2012

New York's vast subway transit system took on the air of a cavernous no-man's land as the blackout cause by Hurricane Sandy south of 34th continues into its 5th day.

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Women Wrestling (32 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Marta La Altena humiliates her opponent, to the delighted outrage of the crowd.

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Women Wrestling (33 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Denita La Intocable exhorts her fans to make some noise during her bout with the evil Marta La Altena.

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Women Wrestling (34 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

In the last ten years, increasing numbers of indigenous woman have been entering the rings in the outskirts of La Paz, fighting back against the dominant culture of machismo and discrimination.

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Women Wrestling (35 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Residents of El Alto riveted by the Sunday afternoon action at the 12 Octubre Stadium. The vast majority of the city's population is indigenous - and poor. The weekly bouts make for an inexpensive family day out.

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Women Wrestling (36 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

In an early bout, Dina La Reina Del Ring is ambushed by her female opponent's masked male partner. She manages to get the better of both of them - for now.

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Women Wrestling (37 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

The Polla skirt is one of the most recognisable elements in the Aymara woman's traditional dress. Derived from traditional Spanish costumes of centuries ago, it has become a symbol of indigenous pride.

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Women Wrestling (38 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

The Cholita Luchadores spend a lot of time on their appearance prior to entering the ring. There is an air of female camaraderie in the makeshift changing room, before the battles begin, of course.

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Women Wrestling (39 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Dina La Reina Del Ring, in prayer, before her bout at the 12 Octubre Stadium in El Alto.

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Women Wrestling (40 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Carmen Rojas takes a pinch of Coca Leaf about an hour before she enters the ring. Coca is widely chewed amongst the Aymara and Quechua population. Its practical effects - mental stimulation, appetite suppression and energy are a boon in the ring.