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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 16
Saint Modeste
By Leyland Cecco
31 Mar 2015

Starting clear, the boiling process removes the water and gives the syrup its distinct golden color.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 17
Saint Modeste
By Leyland Cecco
31 Mar 2015

A worker at Simone Vezina's sugar shack rests while guests in the other room eat.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 18
Kedgwick
By Leyland Cecco
31 Mar 2015

Etienne St. Pierre examines syrup samples. The color is graded from light to dark, with the darkest often used for large scale industrial purposes, like maple flavoring.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 19
Saint Quentin
By Leyland Cecco
31 Mar 2015

A large maple leaf sculpture greets visitors to Saint-Quentin, New Brunswick. The town also holds an annual maple festival to usher in the beginning of the sap harvest.

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On Deaf Ears 4
Rua Alcindo Guanabara, 78-122 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-130,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
30 Mar 2015

A pregnant woman gives a friend a back massage at 2:00 AM as other sleep and rotate shifts. As some sleep, others stay awake to watch for police.

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On Deaf Ears 5
Rua Alcindo Guanabara, 78-122 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-130,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
30 Mar 2015

Andressa (alias), 20, posing for a portrait. Andressa spoke about leaving her boyfriend that day after he hit her. Despite this, they were seen cuddling 20 minutes later.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 02
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
30 Mar 2015

Buckets hang off maple trees as a taps hammered into the trees drip sap, which will be used to map syrup. Buckets attached to trees are becoming increasingly rare, as producers opted for vacuum tubes with much higher yields.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 06
Quebec City
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Quebec's cold winter has delayed the start of the syrup season for more than a month. Because climate change will cause more dramatic season fluctuations, a stockpile of syrup can will benefit the Federation.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 08
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Vacuum tubes on Angele Grenier's property. The trees will produce between 45-50 barrels, each 400 pounds.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 09
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Vacuum tubes weave through the forest on Angele Grenier's property. To fuel her boiler, Grenier will use 40 cords worth of wood.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 10
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

"I want the freedom to sell my syrup wherever I want," says a defiant Angele Grenier. She has been selling her syrup in New Brunswick to avoid the Federation.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 11
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Angele Grenier surveys the tubing that carries maple sap from the trees to collection barrels. There are more than two miles of tubing on her property.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 12
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Pike, Tommy Brochu's dog, sniffs at the converted freezer that holds the pumps.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 13
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Tommy Brochu checks his vacuum pumps days before the season begins. He has harvested maple syrup for the last 4 years and sells through the Federation.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 20
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Discarded barrels that may have been recovered from a massive theft at the federation warehouse in 2012. The theft saw $18 million worth of syrup stolen. The perpetrators remain unknown, but various producers and distributors opposed to the Federation in general have been accused and harassed by the federation over the incident.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 21
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

Inspectors contracted by the Federation of Quebec Maple syrup producers inspect samples drawn from barrels in the Federation's Global Strategic Reserve.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 22
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

The Global Strategic Reserve in Laurierville holds more than 62,800 barrels. Split between two facilities, the total reserve is 68 million pounds of syrup.

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Canada's Maple Syrup Cartel 23
Laurierville
By Leyland Cecco
29 Mar 2015

The Global Strategic Reserve in Laurierville holds more than 62,800 barrels. Split between two facilities, the total reserve is 68 million pounds of syrup.

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Explosion Rocks a Munitions Depot in ...
Aden, Yemen
By anisalbareq
28 Mar 2015

Aden, Yemen
March, 28th

A massive explosion rocked a munitions depot held by the Houthi rebels in the southern port city of Aden, in Yemen, on Saturday, March 28th. The depot, which had been held by forces loyal to ousted President Ali Abdullah Saleh, an ally of the Houthis, was being looted.

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Munitions Depot Destroyed By Explosio...
Aden, Yemen
By Amged Sabeeh
28 Mar 2015

Aden, Yemen
March, 28th

A munitions depot belonging to Houthi rebels was destroyed by a massive explosion in the southern port city of Aden, in Yemen, on Saturday, March 28th. Unverified reports say that fighters loyal to former President Ali Abdallah Saleh have attacked the compound, also taking over a military base close to the depot in the Iron Mountain, in the outskirts of Aden. Also the footage shows some missiles and rockets taken by the attackers inside the base. Reports say that at least 20 Houthi fighters have died in the explosion.

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The Courageous Duo Battling to Educat...
Dubai
By Lola García-Ajofrín
27 Mar 2015

“Neither the government of Cambodia nor its families care about blind children”
 
"No – absolutely not." This is what the Cambodian Minister of Education said to Benoit Duchateau-Arminjon in 1993 when he proposed to open the country’s first school for blind children. "If you want, take the money and invest it in normal schools,” he remembers being told.

“No,” other families said to Phalla Neang, a cambodian teacher, when she drove her small motorcycle from house-to-house, asking if there were blind children there. “Some people shut the door in my face,” she recalls. Now she laughs about it. At the time, blindness was considered a curse in Cambodia. But Benoît had promised a blind child, Wanna, that he would go to school. With that promise he convinced Phalla to join his organization, the Krousar Thmey Foundation.

"It was crazy," he admits. "I looked for her and I told her: I know you can help me but I’m only able to pay you $100." And she agreed. Phalla Neang, one of ten finalists under consideration for the “Nobel” of teaching at the 2015 Global Teacher Prize event held in Dubai, became the first teacher of Braille in the history of her country. Wanna, their first student, is now a professor of music.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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On Deaf Ears 2
Rua Alcindo Guanabara, 78-122 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-130,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
27 Mar 2015

Hiogo, 23, (center) emaciated. Food was scarce in the camp and usually consisted of stale crackers obtained from the homeless shelter or pasta made at a friends house and brought over. Hiogo is a day laborer working construction and in recent months has struggled to find work.

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On Deaf Ears 7
Rua Alcindo Guanabara, 78-122 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-130,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
27 Mar 2015

Homeless women play cards to pass the time as they sit on their signs. Residents of a favela live effectively in a dictatorship run by drug gangs. The idea of using free speech to demand their rights is new to many of them.

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On Deaf Ears 10
Rua Alcindo Guanabara, 78-122 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-130,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
27 Mar 2015

Stephany B., 24, (right) does nails as they talk about politics. Stephany said she wants a house with a yard so she can do nails and earn a living from home.

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Rio's Homeless Sidelined in the Name ...
Rua Alcindo Guanabara, 78-122 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-130,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
26 Mar 2015

On the morning of March 26th, 2015, roughly 100 families were forcibly evicted from their homes by police in an abandoned lot in downtown Rio De Janeiro.  “If you don’t leave peacefully, you’ll leave when the bullets come down”, a police officer threatened, recalled M., a young black man who requested anonymity. By all accounts police were merciless in their eviction and went as far as confiscating simple things like hammers and pliers, allegedly for safety concerns.

Again homeless, the evicted families decided to sleep on the steps of City Hall and ensure their demands for affordable housing be heard. “People think we’re trying to rob them, but in fact we’re running away from that”, Fernando M., 48, said in desperation. Like Fernando, many of the evicted people were escaping the undeclared war between police and drug gangs in the city's Favelas, or slums. While the government does offer a growing number of public housing projects for the poor, few find them desirable to live in as they are still under the control of hostile drug gangs. Instead, these people set up homes in safer areas in the center of the city. 

Other evictees were crushed by soaring rent stemming from Olympic makeovers in their communities. Fernando recalled his rent only a few years ago was R$200 ($65 USD) and now has ballooned to over R$500 ($160 USD). Others are simply unemployed due to a sagging economy. Stuck in a catch-22, many are now unemployable because they have no fixed address.

As the days passed, the echoes of their discontent landed on the deaf ears of a bureaucratic and incompetent local government. In the end, no official action was taken by the city to ameliorate their situation. They eventually left their makeshift occupation by City Hall one-by-one. On April 6th, the remaining dozen or so families that had not left earlier decided to abandon the camp. Many of them found temporary housing in shelters, a friend’s house or other clandestine encampments throughout out the city.

Despite their efforts, the evicted families improvised war of attrition with local authorities is lost and their grievances continue unanswered. 

These photos offer an intimate portraite of some of Brazil's most neglected people.

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On Deaf Ears 1
Rua Alcindo Guanabara, 78-122 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-130,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
25 Mar 2015

Recently evicted from an abandoned lot in downtown Rio, a now homeless man begins to spontaneously pose for a portrait. Tensions were high as just hours earlier they were evicted at gunpoint from a plot belonging to the Rio de Janeiro state water company, CEDAE.

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On Deaf Ears 16
Praça Floriano, 176-242 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-007,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
25 Mar 2015

New construction projects tower over the ruble of recently bulldozed shacks. Over 100 families lived on this abandoned plot belonging to CEDAE, the state water company. This area was once blighted and is now being renovated for the Olympic games.

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On Deaf Ears 13
Praça Floriano, 176-242 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-007,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
25 Mar 2015

Homeless workers stand in attention at the steps of city hall as a meeting is called to discuss their housing situation. Behind them stands the Municipal Theater, which was remodeled at a cost of over $30 million dollars in 2010.

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On Deaf Ears 14
Praça Floriano, 176-242 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-007,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
25 Mar 2015

A pensive moment on the steps of city hall as recently displaced homeless workers rest after being evicted at 5 AM by police.

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On Deaf Ears 15
Praça Floriano, 176-242 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20031-007,Brazil
By Antonio Franco
25 Mar 2015

Homeless workers gather to hear proposed solutions from a mediator from the city council. Through donations, they managed to raise nearly $150 USD for diapers and food for the children. However, no permanent solution was found.

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Hindu Pilgrims Reach for Katasraj in ...
Chakwal
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
15 Feb 2015

Every year a large number of Hindu visit Katasraj temples. Katasraj is a Hindu temple complex situated in Katas village near Choa Saidanshah in the Chakwal district of Punjab in Pakistan. Dedicated to Shiva, the temple has, according to Hindu legend, existed since the days of Mahābhārata and the Pandava brothers spent a substantial part of their exile at the site. The Pakistan Government is considering nominating the temple complex for World Heritage Site status. In 2007, it also proposed to restore the temple complex. In 2012, the temple pond is drying up due to heavy use of ground water for industrial purposes. But this year there are only 26 pilgrims visited for the performance of their religious rituals.

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Banned from Making a Living for Secur...
Sanaa
By TTM Mena Desk
27 Dec 2014

40 year old Mershid al-Merhibi makes a living by transporting people on his motorbike through the Yemeni capital, Sanaa.
For 7 years the taxi motorbike has been the only source of income for Mershid, his wife and 5 children.
Despite his BA degree in business he has not been able to find a job and has no choice but to work as a taxi biker because of the high rate of unemployment and the government’s failure to resuscitate the economy.

Like all other taxi bike drivers in Sanaa, Mershid makes up to five US dollars a-day, which is barely enough to make ends meet. However, this income is now in danger.
At the beginning of December, 2014, the Yemeni government passed a law banning motorbikes in the capital to try to prevent frequent assassinations and acid attacks carried out by unknown gunmen on motorbikes.

The government claims that motorbikes makes it easy for criminals to conduct attacks and then quickly escape.

The taxi bikers say banning motorbikes is not the answer because it is their only source of income, and so Mershid and many others continue to work on their motorbikes at high risk of being caught by the police, who Mershid says will probably destroy his bike.

Interviews:

Mershid al-Merhibi, Motorbike Driver (man, Arabic):
01:41
"I am Mershid al-Merhibi. I’m 40 years old and graduated from Sana’a University. I was forced to work with the motorcycle because there are no jobs and I am unemployed. You can see for yourself how the situation is here.”

02:18
“I wake up each morning and get on my bike and make my way to this intersection to wait for passengers to come. Sometimes, I carry one passenger and sometimes two. They come and we negotiate the price and then I take them to their destination.”

02:44
“Sometimes I find 3-4 passengers a-day. God does not disappoint, and I am thankful for that.”

03:24
“During the past two years, a lot of problems happened with motorcycles. A lot of assassinations occurred here in Sana’a as well as in other provinces . Because motorbikes are easy to get away with, these wicked people use them as a tool to carry out assassinations and acid attacks. They ride and throw acid then easily escape on their bike. This act has ruined work for motorbike drivers including me.”

03:58
“I am just looking for work but I could not find anything except working on my motorbike. They need to find us a solution”

Hussain al-Shadadi, Traffic Officer (man, Arabic):
04:05
“There are people who really need the motorbike to make money. They don’t have any other source of income except with their motorbike. However, because there are criminals who are causing problems and assassinating people, politicians, security and army personal with it, making a living on a motorbike has been banned”.

Mershid al-Merhibi, Motorbike Driver (man, Arabic):
05:18
“Sometimes the government sends police patrols to confiscate motorbikes, they take it from you by force. If you can get away from them and manage to transport one or two passengers a-day, this is good for you. However, I have seen them take a motorbike and cut it in half before my eyes.”

05:54
“The money I make in this job is often saved. Some of it is spent on rent, the kids and their school and to buy basic necessities for living. Even though the money is not enough, it still helps out. If they take away our motorbikes, then may god help us; where will we go and what we will do”.

06:25
“We ask Allah for a better, stronger nation that will not prohibit motorbikes so people can make a living”

Shot List:

Various shots of Mershid on his motorbike
Various shots of bikers
Surveillance camera video showing an acid attack on a man in the street
Various shots of Mershid and passenger on the bike

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Education Changes Under Syrian Opposi...
Aleppo
By mohammed alhadi
30 Nov 2014

November 2014
Taqad, Aleppo Province, Syria

Students in the rebel-controlled village of Taqad to the west of Aleppo no longer have to pay tribute to the Syrian regime.
In this village with a population of 11,000, public schools follow books issued by the interim government appointed by the opposition Syrian National Coalition.
The director of one the local schools says that the new curriculum “shifted from glorifying the regime to glorifying the homeland.”
References to Bath party’s ideology or the “achievements” of Presidents Bashar al-Assad and his father the late President Hafez al-Assad were omitted from the new books, which are printed in Turkey and opposition-held areas in Syria.
Schools in this little town, however, have other pressing needs to deal with. Teachers work in overcrowded classrooms and students sometimes ditch school when they hear the sound of warplanes.

Shot list

00:00 – 00:06
A medium shot shows pages from a primary-school book coming out of the printer.

00:07 - 00:20
A medium shot shows a man binding a book.

00:21 – 00:32
Interview with ِAhmad Jumaa, principal of Qaddour al-Sayyid School (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

00:33 – 00:35 A medium shot shows a man binding a book.

00:36 – 00:39
A wide shot shows graffiti that reads: “He who opens a school closes a prison – Al-Urfan Organization [an Islamic social welfare organization].”

00:40 – 00:43
A wide shot shows a young boy carrying a backpack with the UNICEF logo running across the school courtyard.

00:44 – 00:46
A close-up shot shows a school girl writing.

00:47 – 00:59
Interview with Abdel Karim Subhi, a second-grade student (Boy, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

01:00 – 01:03
A close-up shot shows the face of a young student during a mathematics lesson.

01:04 – 01:07
A wide shot shows a teacher explaining a mathematics problem to a student on the blackboard.

01:08 – 01:32
Several shots show books being printed.

01:33 – 01:30
A close-up shot shows the covers of books produced by the Syrian interim government.

01:31 – 01:46
Interview with a primary school teacher (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

01:47 – 01:53
A wide shot shows a second-grade science class in session. The teacher asks: “Who can name an animal that could fly?”

01:54 – 02:02
A medium shot shows a second-grade student answering a grammar question.

02:03 – 02:07
A close-up shot shows the hands of two students writing.

02:08 – 02:20
Interview with Rama Humaida, a seventh-grade student (Girl, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

02:21 – 02:26
A wide shot shows a teacher writing on the blackboard from behind as students follow.

02:27 – 02:44
Interview with Abdullah Jumaa, a local teacher (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

02:45 – 02:49
A close-up shot shows a page of a book issued by the Syrian regime that explains the history of the 1970 Corrective Movement, the coup d’état carried out by the Baath Party.

02:50 – 02:54
A close-up shot shows a page of a book issued by the Syrian regime that explains when President Bashar al-Assad came to power and praises Syria’s policies.

02:55 – 03:01
A close-up shot shows the covers of books produced by the Syrian interim government.

03:02 – 03:10
A wide shot shows a demolished school wall.

Interviews

00:21 – 00:32
Interview with Ahmad Jumaa, principal of Qaddour al-Sayyid School (Man. Arabic)

“I am the principal of Qaddour al-Sayyid School. The provisional Syrian government gave us schoolbooks. Some books were missing, though, and we had to print them locally.

00:47 – 00:59
Interview with Abdel Karim Subhi, a second-grade student (Boy, Arabic)

“I am eight years old. Whenever airplanes are flying, my siblings and I do not come. We wait for them to end their raids so we come to school.”

01:31 – 01:46
Interview with a primary school teacher (Man, Arabic)

“Despite the hard conditions we are living in and continuous airstrikes, we started the new academic year.”

02:08 – 02:20
Interview with Rama Humaida, a seventh-grade student (Girl, Arabic)

“My siblings and I come from a middle-class family, and we come to school every day to learn. My favorite subject is religion, and I wish to be a religion instructor in the future.”

02:27 – 02:44
Interview with Abdullah Jumaa, a local teacher (Man, Arabic)

“Books were amended to suit the current situation. All the content that glorifies [President] Bashar al-Assad and his were removed. The new books shifted from the glorification of the regime to the glorification of the entire homeland. Certain passages were omitted and other ones that suit the current phase were kept.

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ISIS Food Inspectors in Raqqa
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
09 Nov 2014

Raqqa, Syria
November 2014

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of ISIS and subjected to review and censorship before publication. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

Footage shows members of the ISIS-run department of control and inspection at work. The video includes an interview with a member of the Control and Inspection Office, who says that the office monitors the quality of different food products and whether they have been produced according to Islamic law. It also includes an interview with a grocer. ISIS members are seen destroying what an announcer says are expired products.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide/ external of “Control and Inspection” office run by ISIS
Wide of Raqqa city and ISIS flags

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed ISIS Official
00:08 - 00:44
“The Control and Inspection office has been established in Wilayat [Province] of Raqqa. The office is divided into [two] departments; the first is the Health Inspection Department, whose task consists of inspecting food items and other supplies in the markets. The reports filed by this department are eventually given to the Islamic court. The Meat Department, on the other hand, inspects the quality of all kinds of meat that are being sold. All meat obtained from animals that have not been slaughtered at the slaughterhouse is confiscated; butchers who slaughter animals outside the slaughterhouse are punished.”

Wide of people inside Control and Inspection Office
Close-up of inspector filling in Control and Inspection report
Wide of motorcycles with plates that read “Control and Inspection”
Wide of two men driving away on motorbike with a plate that reads “Control and Inspection”
Wide of pickup truck carrying melons and watermelons
Wide of street and passersby
Various of inspectors examining packed food items inside a grocery store
Various of packed food items stocks
Close-up of ISIS official reports

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed grocery store owner
01:33 – 02:10
“Thanks be to God, and peace be upon God’s Messenger. The Islamic State has set an office for control and inspection, which has had a positive role. It has reminded Muslims of the Prophet’s saying: ‘He who cheats us is not one of us.’ However, a merchant might unintentionally forget certain items on the shelf. Other grocers deliberately leave [expired] merchandise in their shops. We advise them to fear God. We have seen that they [inspectors] – may God reward them – bring this issue to people’s attention. Whenever they find expired products for the first time, they issue a warning and destroy these products. May God reward them.”

Various of inspectors spraying writings saying that stores are being sealed for malpractice

NAT SOUND (Arabic) Announcement by ISIS member
02:26 – 03:12
“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate; thanks to be God, Lord of the worlds; and peace be upon God’s messenger. The Office of Control and Inspection, which is part of the Hisba [Islamic Police] department, has confiscated large amounts of spoiled, expired or badly stored goods, including foodstuff, grain legumes, detergents, beauty products and [UNINTELLGILBLE] products. These products were located in markets in Raqqa province and have an estimated value of 2 million Syrian pounds.
Now, we are going to destroy these products in this public square, in front of all the people. Thanks be to God, Lord of the worlds.”

Various of ISIS members destroying food and other items in public
Various of ISIS members unloading and burning boxes in a dumpster
Wide of clock tower covered with ISIS flag in central Raqqa
Various of ISIS traffic police
Various of workers removing garbage from the street

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'Consumer Protection' in the Islamic ...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
08 Nov 2014

November 9, 2014
Raqqa, 2014

The Islamic State "Control and Inspection Office" is one of the most active governing ministries in Raqqa. This footage shows members of the ministry searching for expired or spoiled products and products subject to poor storage in the stores and warehouses of Raqqa. The products are then confiscated and destroyed in public.

Other active Islamic State public offices in Raqqa include the Traffic Police Office and the Islamic Services Office.

Shot List:

-Ministry employee finishing his work in the office

-Ministry workers parading in the streets of Raqqa

-Ministry officers fining shop owners for having poor or expired products in their stores.

-One of the shop owners (interviewed) talks about the fining process: either they sign a commitment (pledge paper) or their shop will be sealed with red wax for several days.

-Products are taken to a public square in Raqqa, where Hisbah [Islamic State enforcers] men destroy a small amount of these products in front of the citizens, and the larger amount is taken to the dumpsite.

Speakers:

(00:08) Abu Al Bara’, worker at the Control and Inspection Office: The office was established in the city of Raqqa, and it is divided into two departments: the first is the most important department, the “Health Control Office”. Its main task is to monitor the markets and control the goods in the shops. This division fines shop owners and the case is referred to the court in order to take the right decision. The second division is the “Meat Department”. It is responsible for monitoring all kinds of meat in the State. This department punishes those who slaughter [their animals] outside a slaughterhouse (00:45).

(01:33) Abu Ahmad, a shop owner: Al hamdulillah [Thank god], the Islamic State established the Control and Inspection Office, and it has played a good role. He who defrauds is not one of us من غش فليس منا [Islamic Saying]. However sometimes, the shop owner unwittingly forgets some products on the shelves, and other times, other shoppers do it on purpose, but God punishes them. They usually warn the owners the first time, and then they destroy their products if they repeat.

(02:27) Abu Qahtan, one of the Hisbah men: Bismillah ir-Rahmanir-Rahim [In the name of God, the merciful, the compassionate], this is the Control and Inspection Office of the Islamic State. We seized large amounts of spoiled or expired products and products that were subject to poor storage. [This includes] food to beauty products. These products were seized in the shops of the Raqqa market, [and are valued at] approximately 2,000,000 SYP (11979.66 USD). We will destroy them now in front of everyone in this public square (03:12).

This footage was shot by a contributor who had clearance from the Islamic State to film in Raqqa. The footage was reviewed and approved by the Islamic State before being released.

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Libyan Army Moves to Stop Rebels
Benghazi
By Ahmad Mogharbel
20 Oct 2014

October 20, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

The Libyan army launched an attack to stop rebel forces from capturing Benina International Airport in Benghazi, which has been under attack for months. Government ground troops, supported by air force, used mortar and heavy artillery fire, making a swift advance on positions held by Islamist rebels.

The government’s “Thunder 21” and “Artillery 204” battalions participated in the fighting that took place in the western Benghazi are of Al-Guarscia, which killed scores of government troops and rebels. Many civilians were either killed in the fighting or had to flee their homes.

The recent fighting is part of an offensive led by former General Khalifa Haftar to regain control over Benghazi, Libya’s second city.

Shot list:
1- A fighter fires a large-caliber sniper shot.
2- A fighter shoots a mortar shell.
3- Military vehicles with rocket launchers mounted on them move in a convoy.
4- Large rockets are fired from launchers mounted on a military vehicle.
5- Small rockets are fired from launchers mounted on a military vehicle.
6- A fighter on top of a military vehicle shoots rounds of heavy machine guns.
7- Empty ammunition boxes and bullet cases lie on the ground.
8- A destroyed building.

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Women-only carriages in Thailand
Bangkok
By Ana Salvá
31 Jul 2014

On August 1, 2014, the Thai government brought back train carriages for women and children under 10 years old. These carriages ceased to be operational in 2002 due to financial losses.

This move comes after the shocking rape and murder of Nong Kaem, a girl of 13 who was traveling on an overnight train to Bangkok on July 6. Since this incident hundreds of thousands of people are pressuring the government to take action and toughen penalties for sex offenders, calling for capital punishment.

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Tal Afar Refugees Arrive in Baghdad
Baghdad
By TTM Contributor 16
21 Jul 2014

Um Ali is a refugee from Tal Afar in northern Iraq. She fled to Sinjar to escape the mortar shells, raining down on her town. Um Ali along with other residents of Tal Afar fled to Erbil where they slept at the gate for five days, then on to Kirkuk, and Dyala, until they reached al-Nahrwan on Sunday. “The government did not help us”, she said, “We faced a difficult situation after leaving Tal Afar, we are 50 families and the inhabitants of al-Nahrwan are the only ones who helped us

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Mass Garbage-Man Wedding in Yemen
By Muatasm Mansor Al-Hitari
16 Jul 2014

June 21, 2014
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni government subsidized a mass wedding for 350 couples, the men of which were all garbage collectors. They were provided with traditional dress, music and the marriage ceremony. Samir Shamal, 25, was one of the grooms who was married. Despite being recently betrothed he still lives at home and is unable to move out with his wife because the wages for garbage collection are too low.

Transcription:
Samir Shamal, 25, Male. Arabic:
"My name is Samir Shamal Abdullah and I work as a garbage-man. The salary is 27,000 (Yemeni rial) but it is not enough to cover our basic needs along with the rent and water bills, and all of that, but thank God. Life is hard, and the salary is only 27,000. I am about to have my own a family, and I do not know if I should live with my siblings or elsewhere. The rent elsewhere is at least 30,000. We were all living together, and we are all men, but now a woman is going to live with me, so I do not know if I can still live here, as it is embarrassing for me and my siblings. The salary is not enough for me to rent outside but I will find a person who is willing to lease a small place and I will take it."