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Life after Ebola in Liberia: A Diffic...
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to everyday life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems. Survivors living on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia share their experiences of illness, loss, and coping with a new reality as the disease is slowly but surely eradicated from their area.

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

After one week of throwing up, Bindu, 23, went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

Helena Henry (30) and her brother were the first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Cane land Iran
Haft Tape
By Javid Tafazoli
09 Nov 2014

Little is known about sugar cane harvesting in southwestern Iran. Here the workers come with hopes of a better life but arrive to find extremely harsh working conditions. The work is hazardous and injuries are frequent, but there is no support system for the workers. They are in a system which abuses their need to earn a living and there is no thought on the safety of workers. They are under constant surveillance as they work 12 hour days, six days per week for which they get paid $10 per day. Most of them are from the western regions of Ilam and Lorestan and are contracted by organizations hired by plantation owners in their home towns. The season starts before spring arrives and does not finish until autumn. First they burn the fields, to make harvesting easier, before using sharp scythes to cut the canes.

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: a man at the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting holds a placard reading ÒFor 17 years from the disappearance we are asking ÔWhere is Yusuf Nergiz?ÕÓ (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Ersoy Tan, a freelance journalist from Istanbul, takes photo of the 499th meeting of the so-called ÒSaturday Mothers,Ó Kurdish women protesting every Saturday for their children, who disappeared while in custody of Security Forces. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Some of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ, Kurdish women who protest every Saturday about their childrenÕs disappearance while in custody of Security Forces. Dozens, then hundreds of people have joined their quest to know their children or
husbandsÕ fate.

During the 1980s and 1990s, hundreds of political activists, journalists or suspected sympathizers of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party, PKK, were detained by security forces and never seen alive again. PKK is considered a terrorist group by Turkey, the EU and USA.
(Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Three of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ holding portraits of their disappeared relatives. The group was dubbed ÒMothersÓ by the press for the similarities with the Argentinian Mothers of Plaza de Mayo, who have often showed their solidarity with the Kurdish women. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Freelance journalist Ersoy Tan hugs another activist at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. Mr. Tan has followed and photographed the latest 299 meetings of the group who asks to know the fate of people disappeared while in custody. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Freelance journalist Ersoy Tan shows a gift he has received from a Kurdish youth: a stick, decorated with traditional Kurdish colors red, green and yellow and the word ÒRojava,Ó the Kurdish region in Syria fighting against ISIS. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A woman in traditional Kurdish attire bows her head in despair while holding the portrait of her husband, detained by security forces in May 1994 and then disappeared, during the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: red carnations and portraits of disappeared people over a banner laid on the ground, reading ÒPerpetrators are known, where are the disappeared?Ó at the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting. Red carnations are a symbol of left wing activism and mourning in Turkey. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A young girl hold the portrait of a relative disappeared while in custody, long before she was born, at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Hanim Tosun (center), wife of Fehmi Tosun, who was detained in Istanbul in 1995 for being a Kurdish activist and never seen again, is hugged by another woman while holding her granddaughter, who never met her grandfather, at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A woman in traditional Kurdish attire looks for the photos of her disappeared daughter at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th
meeting.

Despite undeniable improvements in the past ten years, and especially after the ceasefire and the Òpeace processÓ in the last two, tensions among Kurds, Nationalists, and security forces have led to bloody riots the past month, connected with a perceived inaction of TurkeyÕs government in the border crisis at Kobane. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: After the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting, the group traditionally gathers in a nearby cafŽ to drink ay, the traditional Turkish tea, and discuss the current situation. In these days, the main topics are the siege of Kobane, the ISIS offensive, and TurkeyÕs government attitude towards Kurds. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: One of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ does the defiant communist salute at the cafŽ where they traditionally gather after a meeting. Many of the disappeared people were left wing sympathizers or labor union activists, suspected by security forces to be close to PKK. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Some of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ holding portraits of their disappeared loved ones during their 499th meeting. After 200 meetings, in 1999, the group had to stop their sit-ins because of constant police harassment. After great hopes in the new AKP government went disappointed, they started meeting again in 2009. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Majestic Himalayas
katmandhu
By Berta Tilmantaite
08 Apr 2014

The word "Himalaya" means “House of Snow” in Sanskrit. Home to the highest summits on the planet, the Himalayas span more than 1,500 miles through northern India, Nepal, Bhutan, Tibet, and China. This is majestic landscape of mountains, green valleys and glaciers are also home to many peoples who have managed to live in these harsh surroundings.

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People of Maïdan
Kiev, Ukraine
By Aurélien Cohen
23 Feb 2014

"People of Maïdan" is a series of portraits of protesters and people living and working around the Independance Square, in Kiev.

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Escaping Syria
Tripoli, Bekaa Valley
By Christina Malkoun
04 Dec 2013

March 6th 2013, one Million refugee officially registered at the centre in Tripoli, Lebanon. A number expected in June 2013. Today it is estimated that double this number have crossed into Lebanon, that's how much the situation is getting worse.
Since the Syrian revolution started in January 2011, families have escaped their home, leaving all their belongings behind, their houses destroyed, terrorised, looking for a safer place to live. In August 2011, the UNHCR launched the Tripoli registration centre, ensuring extension of services to persons under its mandate. 600 to 800 refugees register there every day. 2000 register daily in all of Lebanon. And today there are 7000 daily registrations throughout the region, in the countries of asylum, including Lebanon, Jordan, turkey, Egypt and Iraq.
This project is about portraying the lives of Syrian refugees across Lebanon; their struggles, their strength, their weaknesses, their hope of returning home... one day.
Are their rights as refugees being acknowledged? Being outside of their home country, are Syrian children having access to education? Are Syrian men and women being able to work independently to earn a living? Are Syrian elderly having access to health care?
"Please! Take a picture of me and my children. Let the world see!" said to me a syrian woman during a visit to Halba in Northern Lebanon. Disseminating those life abstracts can only generate and enhance awareness. More people are becoming conscious about the situation and are now more involved in helping the ones in need. Some photos are taken at the UNHCR centre in Tripoli, where men, women, children and elderly refugees gather and wait for their turn to register. They stand in front of the gates sometimes under heavy rains, with no shelter. After registering, they will eventually get the help they need. Other photos were taken in Halba, in tiny apartments where 20 people live under one roof. Some women found each other at the Women Association Centre of Northern Lebanon, and started learning and making accessories to earn a living, while others live off charity contributions. Some more photos were shot at the Beqaa Valley, where Syrian families wander around the streets to find a shelter, holding their babies in their arms, and hiding from the rain. But the generosity of the locals had been tremendous, taking them voluntarily under their roof. They are now refugees. A fate they did not choose.

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Protest against violence 3
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Portrait of an African boy during a prayer walk organized by the Christ Kingdom Citizens in front of the City Hall in Durban.

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Protest against violence 10
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

African Children hold signs calling to stop violence during a prayer walk organized by the Christ Kingdom Citizens in front of the City Hall in Durban.

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
11 Jun 2013

Dilan. Age 27. Tourist guide.

"..Since day one we kept growing in numbers. We started for the freedom of trees but it turned into freedom of individuals, çapuling!".

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
10 Jun 2013

Sevgi. Age 32. Freelance Journalist.

"We had enough commandments in how to live our lives here in Turkey. This park has been the beginning of the end".

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
10 Jun 2013

Halil. Age 43. Doctor.

"I was helping the wounded in the infirmary but today I wanted to see the youth in the park. Their way of resisting is very different from what we can imagine."

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
10 Jun 2013

Kuzey. Age 27. Musician.

"This occupation is a new thing for them. And till they give up their projects about this park, we will occupy this park and streets peacefully. It might be even more than that."

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
10 Jun 2013

Eylem. Age 20. Nurse.

Musicians, artists, doctors, nurses, students, activists, environmentalists have joined the rallies against a government that they believe threatens their freedom and way of life. The Park (Gezi) became a symbol of civil resistence, a laboratory for a new culture of resistance.
Chapulling (Turkish: çapuling) is a neologism originating in the 2013 protests in Turkey, coined from Prime Minister Erdogan's use of the term çapulcu (roughly translated to "looters") to describe the protestors. çapulcu was rapidly reappropriated by the protestors, both in its original form and as the anglicized chapuller and additionally verbified chapulling, given the meaning of "fighting for your rights". Chapulling has been used in Turkish both in its English form and in the hybrid word form çapuling. The word quickly caught on, adopted by the demonstrators and online activists.

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
10 Jun 2013

Ahmet. Age 24. Photographer.

Musicians, artists, doctors, nurses, students, activists, environmentalists have joined the rallies against a government that they believe threatens their freedom and way of life. The Park (Gezi) became a symbol of civil resistence, a laboratory for a new culture of resistance."Chapulling (Turkish: çapuling) is a neologism originating in the 2013 protests in Turkey, coined from Prime Minister Erdogan's use of the term çapulcu (roughly translated to "looters") to describe the protestors. çapulcu was rapidly reappropriated by the protestors, both in its original form and as the anglicized chapuller and additionally verbified chapulling, given the meaning of "fighting for your rights".

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
10 Jun 2013

Cem. Age 19. Student.

"It's now a stubbornness issue, my italian friend! They are insisting, so are we. We'll keep it till the end."

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
10 Jun 2013

Riza. Age 34. He is a famous TV actor.

"I'm enjoying this protest, peacefully, because the Prime Minister wants to shut down the state's theater and he interferes with the TV programs. We don't feel free to show our reactions in any field."

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
09 Jun 2013

Ekim. Age 34. PHD Student.

"..A policeman fired the tear-gas canister directly at my body from a distance of ten meters, hitting me in the left shoulder. I was part of a peaceful protest."

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
09 Jun 2013

L. Age 20. Unemployed.

"It's 4 am and we are all here waiting to be kicked out. I am unemployed at the moment and this is the only way of showing our disappointment and fighting against the government's failures".

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
08 Jun 2013

Neda. Age 42. TV director.

Musicians, artists, doctors, nurses, students, activists, environmentalists have joined the rallies against a government that they believe threatens their freedom and way of life. The Park (Gezi) became a symbol of civil resistence, a laboratory for a new culture of resistance.

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
08 Jun 2013

Gokben. Age 35. Marketing operator.

"I started to go to Gezi Park on May 31st. We just want our freedom. We are against prohibitions. We are against the government policy about terrorists and terrorism. The president makes deals with heads of terrorist organizations and we don't accept that. He sells Turkish companies to foreign companies. He hates Ataturk and he tries to destroy Ataturk's principles, works, etc. He cuts trees to make buildings and his aim is to earn lots of money for his family and his supporters. He wants everybody to think like him, behave like him, and live like him. It is not possible. There are many reasons why we want the government to resign.
We collected garbage in Gezi Park. We sang a song. We ate lunch and dinner together. We bought water, bread, chocolate, litter bags and medicine for our friends who are sleeping at night in Gezi Park.I am working so that I can go after my job and during weekends."

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
08 Jun 2013

Cansu. Age 23. TV filmmaker.

"I'm a professional camerawoman, I'm proud to be part of the movement's official TV: "Gezi TV" streaming, together with other professional volunteers".

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The Ancient Craft of Pottery in the G...
Gaza City
By Transterra Editor
06 Jun 2013

Jun 2013 12:00 This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. The tradition of pottery making in Gaza dates back centuries and has been a source of income and family pride. This ceramic factory rest underneath the Attallah family's home. The Attallahs consider the pottery industry a part of their identity and heritage. They are one of the oldest families producing pottery in Gaza. Their factory was established over 60 years ago and are now struggling to maintain not only their business but an ancestral tradition. The security situation in Gaza and the Israeli blockade has made their business unprofitable and on the brink of vanishing.

To Read Full Article Go To : http://transterramedia.com/media/19049
View More Photos Here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1175

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Georgian Dream rally in Tbilisi (11 o...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
27 May 2012

In the spring 2012, before the Parliamentary elections, political coalition Georgian Dream led by Georgian billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili launched its election campaign with a rally in the center of Georgian capital - Tbilisi

Political leaders, activists and supporters of the coalition started gathering at three separate locations of Tbilisi. They began marching towards the Freedom Square where a stage was installed for the rally. While waiting for their leader Bidzina Ivanishvili, several political leaders of coalition addressed the rally.

After the victory of the political coalition Georgian Dream in the Parliamentary elections Bidzina Ivanishvili became the Prime Minister of Georgia. Many participants of that rally became the members of the Cabinet. Irakli Alasania became the Minister of Defense of Georgia, Maia Panjikidze – Minister of Foreign Affairs, Tinatin Khidasheli and David Saganelidze became members of Georgian Parliament.

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Georgian Dream rally in Tbilisi (5 of...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
27 May 2012

In the spring 2012, before the Parliamentary elections, political coalition Georgian Dream led by Georgian billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili launched its election campaign with a rally in the center of Georgian capital - Tbilisi

Political leaders, activists and supporters of the coalition started gathering at three separate locations of Tbilisi. They began marching towards the Freedom Square where a stage was installed for the rally. While waiting for their leader Bidzina Ivanishvili, several political leaders of coalition addressed the rally.

After the victory of the political coalition Georgian Dream in the Parliamentary elections Bidzina Ivanishvili became the Prime Minister of Georgia. Many participants of that rally became the members of the Cabinet. Irakli Alasania became the Minister of Defense of Georgia, Maia Panjikidze – Minister of Foreign Affairs, Tinatin Khidasheli and David Saganelidze became members of Georgian Parliament.

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Georgian Dream rally in Tbilisi (4 of...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
27 May 2012

In the spring 2012, before the Parliamentary elections, political coalition Georgian Dream led by Georgian billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili launched its election campaign with a rally in the center of Georgian capital - Tbilisi

Political leaders, activists and supporters of the coalition started gathering at three separate locations of Tbilisi. They began marching towards the Freedom Square where a stage was installed for the rally. While waiting for their leader Bidzina Ivanishvili, several political leaders of coalition addressed the rally.

After the victory of the political coalition Georgian Dream in the Parliamentary elections Bidzina Ivanishvili became the Prime Minister of Georgia. Many participants of that rally became the members of the Cabinet. Irakli Alasania became the Minister of Defense of Georgia, Maia Panjikidze – Minister of Foreign Affairs, Tinatin Khidasheli and David Saganelidze became members of Georgian Parliament.