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Aleppo Dump Poses Health Hazard
Aleppo
By Abdu al-Fadel
12 May 2015

May 12, 2015
Aleppo, Syria

Residents of the rebel-held Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj neighborhood in Aleppo have to breathe toxic fumes from an uncovered dump. People suffer serious respiratory tract infections and skin diseases because of living near the makeshift landfill, says a public health activist, who urged people to leave the area.

Local residents complained in interviews that Aleppo's local council, which supports the opposition, has not met its duties in finding a solution for this problem.

TRANSCRIPT

00:58 – 01:36
“Trucks are only moving garbage around; they are not removing garbage out of the dump. The local council is not providing any support for its employees. Q: Who is responsible for moving garbage out of the dump?
A: The local council.
Q: And the local council lacks support.
A: It does not have any support. Even our salaries are meager.
Q: There are no good salaries.
A: No, because there is no support.
Q: What is the solution?
A: The solution… this causes malaria. This is poisoning the environment and people. They should find a solution for this disease.”

01:37 – 01:58
“I sent my children to the village because of this dump. I cannot buy them medications anymore. They mostly complain of chest diseases. They cough and complain about their chest pain all the time. I put them in a car and sent them to the village. This is better than buying medications. I do not want anything to happen to them. Nobody is listening to us. Nobody is responding to us at all!”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mahmoud Barakat, Public Health Activist

02:07 – 03:03
“The area surrounding the dump at Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj is crowded. We have suffered because of this dump for the past four years. This dump is supposed to hold garbage before it is transported somewhere else. It has been the source of bad odors resulting from decomposing substances. Microbes and germs are being diffused in the air.
During the summer garbage is burnt, which diffuses gases and fumes. These fumes spread into an area that has a perimeter of more than five kilometres. Most of the people who live in the surrounding area suffer from chronic respiratory diseases.
People suffer from respiratory tract inflammation. Anyone who has asthma cannot live in this area, either.
Most people who live around Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj wish to find another place to live in because they want to escape fumes and odors.”

03:04 – 03:40
“Many people here suffer from skin and respiratory diseases. These fumes, which have been diffused for the past years, might also cause cancer. This is a very serious issue. This garbage has different substances, including plastic and chemicals. Burning these substances is diffusing toxic fumes. Despite several calls in the past four years, nothing has changed. The policy about this dump has not changed. Everything has been the same.
We urge people to leave this area. Leave this area!”

03:41 – 03:54
“It is not acceptable that I have to wear a mask while walking in the street. It is not acceptable either that bad odor goes through my window, which I have to keep open during the summer. My house is one kilometre away from the dump, as you just saw. I do not dare to open the windows because of the smell.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Local Resident
04:34 – 05:15 “I am one of the people who live near the dump of Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj. The dump is completely full. We urge officials who are responsible for this dump to remove the garbage. The diseases from which we are suffering are indescribable. We are trying and urging and different people to do something about this. It is nearly summertime. This could cause leishmaniasis and malaria. We are dying from bugs. Chemical substances are reacting and catching fire. The fumes are also blinding us.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mahmoud Barakat, Public Health Activist
05:40 – 05:57
“This is an image of the dump while is it on fire. It shows how smoke is spreading throughout the entire city of Aleppo. We urge officials to assume their responsibility towards the poor people who have not left this area. They need to remove the waste as soon as possible.”

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Child Labor Tourism 01
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Viku Tupse is 9 years old. Among the trash, he found a broken face of Mickey Mouse. He knows that this will pull on the heartstrings of tourists and puts it on the head. He does not understand why tourists visit the garbage dump where he works, but he likes the candies that they give him. He has lived in the landfill for two years.

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Child Labor Tourism 02
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists is lead through the landfill in Siem Reap, Cambodia where many children work sorting trash.

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Child Labor Tourism 03
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sau Srey Neang is 11 years old and has three brothers and one sister younger. She has gone over a half a year without hearing from her father, who went to work to Thailand. She knows that her family needs help, but she wants to continue studying to be a teacher. This is her first year working in the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 04
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists disturb children working in the garbage dump of Anlong Pi while the children are resting. The tourists, visiting this landfill as part of their package vacation to Cambodia, take pictures of the children with their cameras and phones. Their tour route offers a visit to the garbage dump where children work alongside adults in extreme poverty and dangerous conditions, allowing them to take pictures with the children. The landfill is located a few kilometers from Siem Reap, the most famous tourist destination in Cambodia, for the temples of Angkor.

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Child Labor Tourism 05
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Hael Kemra is 15 years old. In the future she wants to be an English teacher. She began working at the dump at 10 years old. Her mother took her to the garbage dump to earn money when her father abandoned them.

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Child Labor Tourism 06
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Children and their parents, all are landfill workers. They scavenge in the trash and look for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump with a metal hook attached to a wooden stick, walking behind a bulldozer. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. Largely for economic reasons, children are forced to work at the landfill by their parents. Some study in the mornings, and in the afternoons they will work at the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 07
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist gets his picture taken with children working in the garbage dump by his hiking mates. Tourists take pictures and give candies to children. This group of Japanese tourist are medical students who have come to the dump Anlog Pi on their tour rote.

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Child Labor Tourism 08
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Lia Neang Syer is 14 years old. She began working in the garbage dumb at 10 years old. She could not continue studying, because she had no money to pay for books and extra lessons. She has two sisters and one younger brother, and her mother also works at the garbage dump. She does not like the job, but she is forced to work because her family needs the money to live. Behind her, other children look for plastic and metal to sell.

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Child Labor Tourism 09
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The inhabitants of landfills burn some of the waste they receive because it is impossible to recycle all of it, and space is limited. Toxic gases are unbearable, and soil and groundwater are contaminated. Some locals fall sick due to the continuous intake of toxic gases.

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Child Labor Tourism 10
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist covers her mouth with her hands because she can't bear the strong smell that this mountain of toxic waste and decaying food generates. She does this without putting down the iphone with which she takes pictures. Some children living and working in the landfill laugh at her.

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Child Labor Tourism 11
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Meas Chan, 10, looks for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. He walks behind a bulldozer driven by his father, while his younger brother looks at him. About 50 under-aged children work in the garbage dump according to available data.

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Child Labor Tourism 12
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Suy Sokhon is 16 years old, and has gone two years without going to school. Her parents can not afford the costs of books and tuition. She has worked in the landfill from 12 years of age.

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Child Labor Tourism 13
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

While Sueun Chany, 12, carries large bags of trash from one side of the garbage dump to the other, a tourist waits to take pictures of children alongside their peers who have arrived by Tuk-Tuk. Foreign tourist visit the Anlong Pi garbage dump as part of their holiday in Cambodia.

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Child Labor Tourism 14
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump, most of whom have come with their families from different regions of the country to work.

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Child Labor Tourism 15
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 16
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of Japanese tourists take pictures of the landfill. Tourists are informed of these visits by word of mouth or directly with local tour guides in the hotels where they stay.

Families working in the landfill do not say anything about the tours. They are silent. The landfill is controlled by a private company that decides who works or does not work at the Anlong Pi, and the company benefits from these tours.

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Child Labor Tourism 17
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai, 15, stands atop a mountain of garbage from which he looks defiantly towards a group of tourists. He started to work in the garbage dump at 12 years-old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 18
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A truck from GAEA, the company in charge of landfill Anlong Pi, arrives at the landfill full of garbage from Siem Reap. From dawn to dusk, for a minimum of 12 hours per day, people working in the landfill, children and adults, scavenge through tons of waste, looking for recyclable materials or any items with value that can be sold like plastic, paper, copper, glass, etc. to eek out a living.

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Child Labor Tourism 19
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 20
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Japanese tourists cover their faces with masks to avoid breathing in toxins or bacteria. One woman takes photos of children working in the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 21
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 22
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The increase in tourism has generated an increase of garbage in Siem Reap. This situation has worsened conditions for families living and working in Anlong Pi. The landfill is being expanded by GAEA. This company earns big money with the business of garbage and recycling.

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Child Labor Tourism 23
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai is 15 years old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 24
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 25
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sigen Rathy is 12 years old. She returns to work as the tourists leave the landfill after their tour. She wants to be a doctor in the future. Working alongside her parents, she earns about 4000 rieles daily, or just under one dollar.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (28 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
30 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga looks for recycling materials at he Dandora dump site 28 May 2013 near the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.