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A Biodiversity Odyssey
montreal
By Conteur d'images
05 Sep 2015

To celebrate the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020, an environmentalist and a photojournalist visited 10 countries in 300 days in order to discover the most innovative solutions implemented by the peoples of the world to preserve the biodiversity of our planet. A fabulous educational journey through the Amazon, the Arabian desert, the Andes, the Pacific Ocean and more!

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A Biodiversity Odyssey (EN)
Worldwide
By Conteur d'images
06 Mar 2015

To celebrate the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020, an environmentalist and a photojournalist visited 10 countries in 300 days in order to discover the most innovative solutions implemented by the peoples of the world to preserve the biodiversity of our planet. A fabulous educational journey through the Amazon, the Arabian desert, the Andes, the Pacific Ocean and more!

TEXTLESS, NATURAL SOUND VERSION / CONFORMED DIALOGUES AVAILABLE ON REQUEST.

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The Greek return to the land 01
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

Dimitris, 32, spent his youth fighting against Greek police in the streets of Exarchia, Athens’ anarchist neighborhood. When the 16-year-old Alexis Grigoropoulos was killed by an armed policeman in 2008, the whole city became inflamed. “For two month, I didn’t sleep; Athens looked like under a civil war. But I was mature enough to come here and start my life again. First I felt guilty towards my friends, but now I know that I took the right decision”, says the apple and olive producer in his field of apple trees in Pelion, a natural paradise in the north of Athens.

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The Greek return to the land 03
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

“The movement of return to the land is possible because of the late urbanization of Greece”, underlines Kasimis Charalambos, from his desk of researcher in the University of agriculture of Athens. “Almost every Greek has kept a piece of land in his village of origin”, he adds. Dimitris lives in the house built by his grand-father and works the field that the latter bought decades ago. In spite of this support, it is only now, after five years of continuous efforts, that he sees the end of the tunnel: “This winter will be decisive; my production will be certified ecologic, I will be able to raise the price. Until now, between the price of tools, the rent of the new lands I bought and the salary of the workers, I did not earn anything. Still, I work between 12 to 16 hours every day during the winter!”

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The Greek return to the land 04
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

In the midst of an economic crisis in which Greece lost more than 600.000 jobs, 40.000 agriculture jobs were created between 2009 and 2011! “The rural world resists better than other sectors of the Greek economy. It progressively turns into a refuge and a laboratory of ideas for many city-dwellers, who head for it, by necessity or choice”, claims Kasimis Charalambos. Every choice comes with sacrifices. Dimitris knows it all too well: “The first thing you lose by leaving the city are your social relations. I broke up with my girlfriend because of the distance. Here, you need to be stable not to go mad after two months!” he warns. "Still, whenever a client tells me that my olives are the best he ever tasted, all my efforts are rewarded!"

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The Greek return to the land 05
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

Penelope is able to recognize a handle of 'hypericum' in the middle of the bush of Pelion, to name any plant and flower of the forest in latin and to prepare a cream with it, that will enhance its homeopathic virtues. Still, this radiant 40-years-old Greek lived in Athens most of her life. Five years ago, she decided to replace her urban life for a more natural one. After the death of her father, she sold his flat and bought a piece of land in the middle of the forest of Pelion. To reach the first village, Neochori, she needs to drive for 15 minutes on a stony road, with an old and undeclared Citroën. For her, Pelion is the place "where dreams come true."

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The Greek return to the land 06
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

"Hypericum is great to appease stings or wounds", she explains, fliting around the bushes, her wicker basket in hand. "I learned a lot about homeopathic plants with my mother, who is from Crete. It is a tradition there. But since I live here, I had the opportunity to really deepen and experiment this savoir-faire", she says. "The return to the land is a return to the tradition, as well as a post-modern phenomena", confirms Kasimis Charalambos.

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The Greek return to the land 08
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

Back in her house, Penelope picks some Malva, let her chicken out from his house, in the back of the garden. A big dog is at the entrance, "vital to chase wild pigs", she precises. "For one year, we lived here with a friend without water and electricity. Now things are easier. But my friends are still scared to visit, because they are scared of loosing the confort of the city. Still, when I go back to Athens, every body tells me how he envies me and which he could do it. So why don't they do it?!"

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The Greek return to the land 09
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

"The return to the land is positive in the short term; life is easier and cheaper in the province than in Athens, and cultivating the land is a proactive way to react to the loss of a job or the closure of a company. But on the long term, it is not clear yet if people will manage to earn a living with that", confesses Karina Benessaiah. Penelope does not look for benefits. For her, the return to the land must go with a renewed economic system. "I swap my creams and oils against services with the local community. And I sell my fruits and vegetables in an independant market in Volos, the nearest big city, that was created by an anarchist squat for ecological producers. But here, I don't need a lot to live."

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The Greek return to the land 10
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

"We were cultivating our own vegetables for a few years on the roof of our building. But last year, Yannis and I followed the training of Nea Guinea on plants and herbs. Click! We began to really think about changing our way of life and going back to the rural world", explains Giorgia, while snatching the weeds of a piece of land in Nea Makri, a small village one hour distant from Athens. Every sunday since one year, Giorgia, Yannis, Maria and Ana, who all met during Nea Guinea's trainings, were able to come here and put into practice their lessons. "Before that, we would do any old thing. Now we have a clear idea of what would imply living from the land", says the Greek woman, enthusiastic.

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The Greek return to the land 12
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

Yannis and Maria followed a training of beekeeping in Athens. They are excited to be able to implement it in Nea Makri. "Today, we will release them for the first time", says Maria, anxious. Honey, olive oil, mastic or snails are products of niche that many Greek city-dwellers choose to produce while going back to the land. Mixing tradition and modernity, they apply their own taste and marketing knowledge to ancestral cultures.

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The Greek return to the land 11
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

For 20 years, Giorgia worked as a secretary in a law office. Unemployed for two years, she only finds offers to work for 400€/month, 6 days on 7. "As an unemployed, I even have to pay charges to the State, and I don't receive anything. We feel like thieves, as if we would have to pay back something we robbed. But the only who robbed were the banks!", she denounces. Recently, the Greek vice-minister of Justice brought in a bill proposing to lock up until one year in jail any citizen who would not be able to pay a debt over 5000 euros to the Greek State after 4 months. "Nea Guinea is our way to do the revolution against the system of austerity and neoliberalism. But instead of fighting against police like the anarchists, we do concrete and everyday actions. From housing to energy, health to food, we propose to the Athenians an alternative, sustainable and self-managed way to live, without having debts to pay to a State that we don't trust anymore", abounds Fotini.

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A village’s struggle to preserve its ...
Long La
By Corentin Fohlen
28 Mar 2014

Forests are the heart of Long La's development. In a country ravaged by deforestation, this village of 500 inhabitants has become a model of sustainable development. With the help of Speri, a vietnamese NGO, Long La has found a way to preserve its forest thanks to agroecology.

The forest is rich in medicinal plants and rare species and generates wealth for the community. Prior to 2004, it was threatened by timber exploitation. But its inhabitants soon realized that the water shortages they were facing were not normal and that the air was drier than it should have been in this tropical region.

It did not take long before they began to blame deforestation, which also adversely affects agricultural production. Today, forests cover 40% of the territory of Laos, whereas they made up 70% in the 1950s. In order to protect their forest, villagers in Long La reserved certain areas for the production of timber and others for medicinal plants. In some areas, it is now strictly forbidden to gather wood. They also enacted strict rules to preserve the forest, such as keeping farm animals in paddocks to prevent them from damaging trees.

In 2005, the Laotian government recognized Long La inhabitants' know-how and put them in charge of managing the village's forest. Doing so came naturally to the inhabitants since they all belong to the Hmong community, an animist ethnic group that considers the forest sacred. In Long La, the forest is even believed to host a venerated spirit: the Patongxenh.

Deforestation is being driven by corruption as well as poorly managed industrial-scale plantations for things like rubber. Yet Long La's management of the forest has proven that preservation can lead to development and wealth. Thanks to the forest, the village now cultivates Zong Zwa, a plant with bright yellow flowers that tastes similar to rocca. The village also produces 12 tons of organic vegetables each year which they sell to hotels and restaurants in Luang Prabang. Speri now works with 12 other villages to implement Long La's model. In 2012, the NGO and the villagers created a rural school to train local residents in agroecology.

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Arab Water Ministers Meeting in Cairo
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
07 Jun 2013

The fifth meeting of the Arab Water Ministers Council held on Thursday, June 6, at the headquarters of the Arab League in Cairo to discuss various issue mainly water security headed by the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

The UAE Minister of Environment and Water Dr. Rashid Ahmad Bin Fahad who chaired the meeting, pointed out that the geographical, economical, social and political conditions to the Arab countries have contributed to the diversity of the pressures and challenges faced by the water resources in the Arab countries.

Bin Fahad stressed the importance to enhance joint Arab action in the field of water because of its strategic importance to the countries of the region.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - UAE Minister of Environment and Water Dr. Rashid Ahmad Bin Fahad:
“We are today in the process of putting the structure of the strategic plan of water security in the Arab region. The council further has played an active and effective role in highlighting the water issues in the Arab region in the 6th World Water Forum - Marseille in France. I hope the council would continue its effective role in calling for coordination and good preparation for the next World Water Forum that will be held in Korea, 2015.”

The Arab League Assistant Secretary General for Economic Affairs Dr. Mohammad bin Ibrahim Al Tuwaijri said that the Arab League’s Technical Committee would discuss a variety of topics, including the follow up of the implementation of the resolutions of the Arab Economic and Social Development Summit, pertaining the strategy of water security in the Arab region to address the challenges and the future requirements for sustainable development.

For his part, the Arab League Chief Nabil al-Arabi, in his speech, said that the major dangers on the Arab water security in particular and the Arab national security in general are the Israeli ambitions in the Arab waters.

He further added that the problem of water in the region has political, legal, and economic and security dimensions that cannot be separated from the nature of the Arab-Israeli conflict which is not over yet.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Arab League Chief Nabil al-Arabi:
“The challenges that the water sector is facing in the Arab countries are numerous and multifarious particularly in the light of the climate changes and the phenomenon of drought which gripping some areas in the world include the Arab region.”

They also discussed during the meeting the strategy of water security in the Arab region and the preparation for an international conference on Arab water in the Arab occupied territories.

The issue of water is now in the limelight at the regional level due to a decision by Ethiopia to build a dam on the River Nile, promoting Egypt to react alarmingly toward the plan due to concern over volume of water reaching Egypt.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: June 6, 2013
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: June 6, 2013
Length: 00:02:17
Video Size: 113 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Tilt down shot of the Arab League headquarters in Cairo
2. Medium shot of the logo of the Arab League
3. Various shots of the meeting
4. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - UAE Minister of Environment and Water Dr. Rashid Ahmad Bin Fahad:
“We are today in the process of putting the structure of the strategic plan of water security in the Arab region. The council further has played an active and effective role in highlighting the water issues in the Arab region in the 6th World Water Forum - Marseille in France. I hope the council would continue its effective role in calling for coordination and good preparation for the next World Water Forum that will be held in Korea, 2015.” 5. Various shots of the meeting
6. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Arab League Chief Nabil al-Arabi:
“The challenges that the water sector is facing in the Arab countries are numerous and multifarious particularly in the light of the climate changes and the phenomenon of drought which gripping some areas in the world include the Arab region.” 7. Various shots of the meeting
8. Medium shot of the logo of the Arab League
9. Wide shot of the Arab league headquarters with flags of the participant states

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Children of the guaranà 01
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ tribe lives in the region of the mid Amazon River, on the border between Amazonas and Par‡ states. Inventors of the "Guaran‡ culture", the tribe domesticated this wild fruit and created its processing method, thanks to which Guaran‡ is known and consumed all over the world.

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Children of the guaranà 02
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Known as to locals as "the Children of Guaran‡" the Satere-Mawe indians still maintain their traditional way of planting and using guaran‡, for example as medicine or their ritual drink.

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Children of the guaranà 04
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Pedro, 33, a SaterŽ-MawŽ indian who patrols the forest: "Illegal logging can be hard to tackle. Logging happens deep in the forest, far from the eyes of the world but GPS tracking technology and satellite surveillance means we can find out where loggers are and what kind of timber they want. We are tracking 560 hectares of virgin forest with new technologies, hopefully we will stop illegal logging here."

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Children of the guaranà 12
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Kennedy, 24, defends his land from illegal timber extraction. He is part of an international project with local partners. This project in the Satere-MawŽ area was created to support the local communities and to prevent illegal timber extraction by increasing daily surveillance, mapping forest resources and through a series of initiatives to raise awareness and environmental education. Indigenous and other local forest communities have seen their land seized, their lifestyles destroyed, and their livelihoods stolen. The US is the largest market for timber exported from Brazil. While Americans buy massive quantities of wood, often taken illegally from forests, to construct floors, outdoor paths, and piers, local people and activists working to protect the Amazon are being assassinated and kept quiet through intimidation.

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Children of the guaranà 03
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Mar 2013

The Andir‡ river by night. The SaterŽ-MawŽ live in the region of the mid Amazon River, on the border between Brazil's two biggest states Amazonas and Par‡.

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Children of the guaranà 05
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Mar 2013

It's a long trip to reach the SaterŽ-MawŽ reserve: one hour flight from Manaus to Parintins, the closest city, then an 8 hour trip by riverboat.

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Children of the guaranà 18
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

Every year since 1995, residents of Guaranatuba village and some communities and volunteers from NGOs gather to celebrate the harvest of guaran‡ fruit, known worldwide for its high energy value. During two days of celebration, locals enjoy small performances by folks artists and musical performances to mark the event.

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Children of the guaranà 20
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

A MawŽ girl listens intently to a speech about indigenous rights and the fair trade economy.

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Children of the guaranà 16
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

A MawŽ woman prepares food and a guaran‡ drink at home. Guaran‡ is the daily, ritual and religious beverage, and it is drunk in large quantities by adults and children alike.

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Children of the guaranà 15
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The areas where the SaterŽ-MawŽ live are called "s’tio". In this space each family unit has its residence, where a fire is lit both for cooking and for keeping the residents warm (the fire also serves to congregate the family members around it).

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Children of the guaranà 17
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

Guaranatuba village, located alongside of the Andira riverbank. Two young SaterŽ-MawŽ are preparing a powerful sound system for a guaran‡ harvest festival that hosts music, traditional dance and speeches about indigenous culture and politics.

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Children of the guaranà 22
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

A current project underway in the SaterŽ-MawŽ region involves the mapping of forest resources, the construction of a small nursery to produce 5,000 seedlings per year, making plans for the correct use of natural resources, training in techniques of forestry, collection of seeds and production of seedlings, Copaiba oil and Guarana powder.

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Children of the guaranà 07
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ's name references two animals native in the region. The first word, SaterŽ, means Òburning caterpillarÓ, a reference to their societyÕs most important clan, the one that traditionally appoints the succeeding political rulers. The second word, MawŽ, means Òintelligent and curious parrot.Ó Here, a MawŽ group from various Andir‡ villages is learning something new about the guaran‡ process.

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Children of the guaranà 13
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 25% of global disease could be prevented by better management of the environment, and identifies deforestation as having a serious impact on human health.

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Children of the guaranà 21
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

Idecidis Da Costa, 60, is the village Tuxaua (village chief). Every village has a Tuxaua, who has the power of solving internal quarrels, summon meetings, scheduling celebrations and rituals. He also plans the agricultural activities and commercial transactions, and orders the building of houses.

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Children of the guaranà 24
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

A man washes his clothes in Guaranatuba. The SaterŽ-MawŽ language is part of the Tupi linguistic branch. But the MawŽ vocabulary contains elements that are entirely different from Tupi, and cannot be related to any other linguistic family. Today most SaterŽ-MawŽ are bilingual. They speak their own language and Portuguese.

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Children of the guaranà 25
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

Paulo is working at Posada Vinte Quilos, a small village for sustainable tourism in Guaranatuba. The project contributes to the improvement of socioeconomic, environmental, and cultural protection of traditional Middle Amazon societies through an inclusive model that integrates institution buildings, the preservation of environmental resources, and activities promoting eco-friendly and sustainable tourism.

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Children of the guaranà 09
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

In their "Sitios" families build their kitchen halfway between the house and the river, where the men roast guaran‡ and the women prepare meals from manioc root. They also have their dock where the family members bathe, wash clothes, soak cassava, wash guaran‡ and land their canoes.

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Children of the guaranà 10
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

MawŽ kids drink guaran‡ in a poor village near Guaranatuba. Much of the guaran‡-based Fair Trade economy aims at battling malnutrition and its consequences for the physical and mental condition of a whole generation of children and adolescents.

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Children of the guaranà 11
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ of the Lower Amazon are one of the larger indigenous populations in Brazil and one of the few indigenous groups left in the immediate vicinity of the main Amazon River. Due to prolonged contact with the broader Brazilian society, the SaterŽ-MawŽ have been exposed to a variety of historical changes. As a consequence of a staggering demographic growth, the immediate surroundings of their villages have been largely depleted of game and fish, causing chronic food shortages.

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Children of the guaranà 23
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
21 Mar 2013

A man in Pira’ village is fixing his sanitation system. Pira’ is the first MawŽ community one encounters when traveling by boat from Parintins, the closest city.

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Brazil's Indigenous Tribes Fight Back...
Guaranatuba
By Francesco Pistilli
21 Mar 2013

The Sateré-Mawé people make up one of Brazil’s largest indigenous populations and one of the few who still live in the immediate vicinity of the Amazon River. Just over ten thousand Mawé live in the Andirá-Marau Indigenous Land Reserve, a nearly 800 thousand hectare area spread out over five municipalities between the Amazonas and Pará states demarcated by the Brazilian government in 1982 and ratified by parliament in 1986.

Prolonged periods of contact with guests from the vast modern society of contemporary Brazil, and the increased modernization of neighboring communities have exposed the Sateré-Mawé to a variety of historical changes, not only cultural, but most importantly economic. Staggering demographic growth in areas surrounding their villages, as well as the illegal logging industry have begun to deplete their sources of wild game and fish, making food shortage a chronic problem.

Kennedy, a 24 year old Mawé, defends his land from illegal timber extraction. He is part of an international project with local partners. This project in the Satere-Mawé area was created to support the local communities and to prevent illegal timber extraction by increasing daily surveillance, mapping forest resources and through a series of initiatives to raise awareness and environmental education. Indigenous and other local forest communities have seen their land seized, their lifestyles destroyed, and their livelihoods stolen.

Holding a machete, Pedro, 33, also patrols the forests. "Illegal logging can be hard to tackle,” he said. “Logging happens deep in the forest, far from the eyes of the world but GPS tracking technology and satellite surveillance means we can find out where loggers are and what kind of timber they want. We are tracking 560 hectares of virgin forest with new technologies, hopefully we will stop illegal logging here.”

The US is the largest market for timber exported from Brazil. While Americans buy massive quantities of wood, often taken illegally from forests, to construct floors, outdoor paths, and piers, local people and activists working to protect the Amazon are being assassinated and kept quiet through intimidation.

Since 1995, however, the Sateré-Mawé have placed a great deal of hope on fair trade initiatives that have allowed them to commercialize their traditional products such as guaraná and other goods from the forest. Although well established as an indigenous enterprise on the international market, revenues from the guaraná trade are yet to counter poverty in their villages on a large scale.

Despite their relative isolation, the Sateré-Mawé’s creation of a global “guaraná culture” has left its mark on the globalized cultures of the world’s urban centers. Their history with the fruit is a long one. The Mawé domesticated the Paulinia cupana, a wild vine from the Sapindaceae family, producing a cultivated shrub. They have mastered its planting and processing, allowing them to elaborate a variety of food and drink products from their crops.

A central ingredient in the Sateré-Mawé’s social economy, their guaraná has become a globally popular product for its properties as a stimulant, intestinal regulator, cardiovascular tonic and aphrodisiac. It is also believed by some, though this hasn’t been confirmed, to fight venereal disease.

The first description of guaraná and its importance for the Sateré-Mawé dates to the year the group first had contact with Europeans. Father João Felipe Betendorf describes, in 1669, that "the Andirazes have in their woods a small fruit they call guaraná, which they dry and then press with the feet and make balls with, and which they praise like Europeans praise their gold, and which, grated with a small rock and drunk mixed with water from a gourd, provides them with so great a strength that when the Indians go hunting they do not feel hungry and in addition it makes one urinate and cures fever, headaches and cramps."
Today, though globalization has brought about opportunities to the indigenous people of the world, it has also impeded their ability to retain traditional cultural practices and indigenous knowledge. One solution to this problem has come in the form of fair trade markets and sustainable tourism.

With the help of international NGOs, the Mawé are developing a guaraná based economy that protects their heritage while fighting the poverty that increases in population and the depletion of natural resources has visited upon them. In this model, through funding by international partners indigenous groups are given opportunities to express the potential of their products worldwide, while welcoming visitors in a sustainable manner at home in their villages.

Seven-thousand indigenous people in 85 villages along the Marau, Miriti, Urupadi, Andira and numerous other tributaries of the Amazon are expected to benefit from the work the Sateré-Mawé community has begun.

The final goal of a series of projects organized by the tribe with the help of international actors is to ensure the sustainable management of natural resources that could lay the groundwork for the sustainable production in their forests and rivers. The Sateré-Mawé hope that this will both put an end to chronic food shortage and fight the illegal logging trade that continues to harm their heritage lands.

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Children of the guaranà 06
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
20 Mar 2013

Since 1995 a great deal of hope rests on a fair trade project, which commercializes SaterŽ-MawŽ products such as guaran‡ and several other forest products. Although well established as an indigenous enterprise on an international market, the guaran‡ project still struggles to counter poverty in the villages on a large scale.

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Children of the guaranà 14
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
20 Mar 2013

A MawŽ moves from village to village using a traditional canoe. Guaran‡ is a plant native to the highlands of the MauŽs-Au River basin, which coincides precisely with the SaterŽ-MawŽ's traditional territory. The SaterŽ-MawŽ have transformed the "Paullinia cupana", a wild vine of the Sapindacea family, into a cultivated shrub, and mastered its planting and processing.