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Inside Bangladesh Brothels 07
Jessore, Bangladesh
By Karim + Jenny
16 Feb 2014

Halima, 17 years old, was brought to the brothel without knowing. Now, she has nowhere else to go.

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Inside Bangladesh Brothels 08
Jessore, Bangladesh
By Karim + Jenny
16 Feb 2014

The brothels in Bangladesh are connected through their owners, who often change girls between each other. The idea is that customers should be able to find new faces among the sex workers.

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Inside Bangladesh Brothels 09
Jessore, Bangladesh
By Karim + Jenny
16 Feb 2014

Most girls don't use their real names – they are called things like Jolly, Beauty or Brishti, Bangla for "rain"

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Inside Bangladesh Brothels 10
Jessore, Bangladesh
By Karim + Jenny
16 Feb 2014

Buying the services of a sex worker in Bangladesh is cheap. Young girls earn more, whereas those who have reached their 30s-40s may get paid as little as 60 taka per client (0.7$)

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Inside Bangladesh Brothels 11
Jessore, Bangladesh
By Karim + Jenny
16 Feb 2014

Many workers in the brothel are young, not older than 12-13 years old. They are often from poor background, tricked to the industry by people who promise them other jobs.

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Inside Bangladesh Brothels 19
Jessore, Bangladesh
By Karim + Jenny
11 Feb 2014

Many children are sent by their mothers to be brought up outside the brothels. A shelter home on the outskirts of Jessore is home to more than 100 children.

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Migrant Workers of Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
10 Feb 2014

This sign at St. George's Yacht Club and Marina, used to only say, "STOP SOLIDERE." But after Rahel Abebe, a migrant worker from Ethiopia, was discriminatorily denied entry to the St. George Yacht Club & Marina, the Anti-Racism filed lawsuit on her behalf. The result, most importantly to her, the sign now reads underneath the large writing, "STOP DISCRIMINATION." She has been in Beirut for nearly 14 years and also has a catering service, on the side of her work in a cafe, cooking Ethiopian food.

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Yarmouk Under Siege
Al Kabakbieh Street, Damascus,Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Feb 2014

The Palestinian refugee camp of Yarmouk in Damascus has been under siege by Syrian Regime forces for 8 months. Along with the constant shelling, the civilian residents were trapped, left starving inside with no access to food.

Translation of Interviews:

1st Interview:
Our situation is awful, what more can I say? We have been eating Indomie soup and birds legs (a type of grass/weeds). We call it donkey legs. Even cows don’t eat it. Since the 8th of Ramadan, we have been eating this. I just got a new grandchild and I can't find milk for her. I want to leave, I don’t want to stay here.

2nd interview:
My wife was in a critical condition, no doctors, no hospitals were helping. She has high blood pressure, diabetes, and back problems. She's living with no food, we are living with no food, we don't want donations, we just want them to open the barrier.

3rd interview:
We're dying from hunger. We have no vegetables, no bread, nothing. Our kids are dying from hunger and dehydration, and I hope God can get us back to where we were.

4th Interview:
The situation is very hard and tragic. We are trying to count the people, so any donation or help that comes in, we organize the situation, and try to help the people with anything we can do.

5th Interview:

No food, no water, please God, please.

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Refusal to serve in the IDF 9
Israel
By Fran_oise Beauguion
31 Jan 2014

They're young, they're israeli, and they refuse to serve the army. Activists, against the war, against the palestinian occupation. To fight against the fight...

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
31 Jan 2014

Fatima, 35 years old, sitting at home next to her mother-in-law in Mazar-e-Sharif. Fatima lost her hand to a rocket 14 years ago. She recently married Yar Mohammad, also disabled in both feet. She supports the entire family by knitting traditional dresses. She would love to go back to reading and writing classes, which she did before getting married, but currently no organizations are helping her.

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Refusal to serve in the IDF 12
Israel
By Fran_oise Beauguion
31 Jan 2014

They're young, they're israeli, and they refuse to serve the army. Activists, against the war, against the palestinian occupation. To fight against the fight...

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Refusal to serve in the IDF 14
Israel
By Fran_oise Beauguion
31 Jan 2014

They're young, they're Israeli, and they refuse to serve the army. Activists, against the war, against the palestinian occupation. To fight against the fight...

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Refusal to serve in the IDF 13
Israel
By Fran_oise Beauguion
31 Jan 2014

They're young, they're israeli, and they refuse to serve the army. Activists, against the war, against the palestinian occupation. To fight against the fight...

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Refusal to serve in the IDF 10
Israel
By Fran_oise Beauguion
31 Jan 2014

They're young, they're israeli, and they refuse to serve the army. Activists, against the war, against the palestinian occupation. To fight against the fight...

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Dormitory Life of Moscow 14
Moscow, Russia
By Pascal Dumont
26 Jan 2014

Andrei smoking with a pipe with her friend Masha on the dorm staircase. The dormitory is for students of Moscow State Academic Art Institute.

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Dormitory Life of Moscow 13
Moscow, Russia
By Pascal Dumont
25 Jan 2014

Semen Lukansi in his room. He is 23 years old and came all the way from Yakuts in north-eastern Siberia to study painting in Moscow. He is a famous artist according to other residents in the dorm.

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Bishshow Iztema 2014
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
24 Jan 2014

The Bishwa Ijtema the World or Global Congregation or Meeting is an annual Tablighi Jamaat Islamic movement congregation held at Tongi, Bangladesh by the river Turag. It is the 2nd largest Muslim congregation in the world after the Hajj. The event focuses on prayers and supplication and does not allow political discussion.
The first meeting was reportedly held in 1946 (although various sources indicate other dates for this) and continues to be organized by the Bangladesh Tablighi Jamaat. It lasts three days and is attended by over five million Muslims, making it one of the largest congregations after the Hajj to Mecca and the gathering of Muslims in Karbala, Iraq to commemorate. Ijtema was initiated by an Indian savant named Muhammad Ilyas al-Kandhlawi and began as a small group of religious-minded individuals gathering at a local mosque. For forty-one years Tongi has been the chosen location, although similar programs are held on a lesser scale in other countries. The Ijtema is non-political, and therefore it draws people of all persuasion. Prayer is held for the spiritual adulation, exaltation and welfare of the Muslims community. This immensely popular program gives the people of Bangladesh an opportunity to interact with Muslims from other countries and is commonly attended by prominent political figures.
The congregation takes place at an area comprising 160 acres (0.65 km2) of land (0.25 square mile). Devotees from approximately 150 countries, including the host country, Bangladesh, attend the three-day Ijtema seeking divine blessings from Allah. In recent years, over seven thousands foreign delegates attend the congregation each year. Special rates are provided by Bangladesh Biman's world wonder fund.

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Education for Syrian Refugees in Akka...
Akkar, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
16 Jan 2014

Children running in pajamas and sandals along the frozen field, while their fathers and grandfathers are building the house of a Lebanese family for free, is the first sight you see as you enter the Syrian refugee settlement of Minyara, in Akkar. It is a vision of despair for the Syrian refugees, in a mountainous region where a 3-month-old Syrian baby died of cold in December 2013. But something else you see as you enter the settlement that these Syrians families from Qusayr rent every year from a Lebanese field-owner for $1000, you understand that there are kids are just having fun between two school lessons.

Inside two tents, warmed by a wood-burning stove, small tables and chairs constitute minimalist classrooms. Muhammad, a Syrian teacher whose right arm has been wounded by a bullet in Qusayr, teaches Arabic, mathematics and sciences through songs, games and books he made up, thanks to his 15 years of experience as a teacher in Syria. As for English and French, two volunteer teachers from the NGO Relief & Reconciliation for Syria come every morning to help Syrian children from 1st to 6th grade with these foreign languages, compulsory to enter the Lebanese school system.

Children are cold and traumatized by what they have gone through in Qusayr. After fleeing their city, they walked for 16 km under the bombs of the Syrian regime in summer 2013. Despite this, now education is their hope for a better future and their motivation is boundless. In 2013, 85,000 Syrian children were registered in Lebanese public schools and 100,000 in informal ones, according to Maha Shuayb, director of the Center for Lebanese Studies. But 97 percent of Syrian children drop out of the Lebanese education system. Illiteracy may then be the major issue for the 1.3 million of Syrian refugees in Lebanon, as 50 percent of them are children.

Obstacles such as the language gap and the necessity for many Syrian families to rely on their children’s work to survive limit the access to education. In Minyara, Relief & Reconciliation helps children who try to enter Lebanese schools, but also those who decide to work, with vocational training such as electricity and couture. As Friedrich Bokern, director of the NGO, explains to the children gathered under the tent of the classroom: “Whatever you will decide to do, don’t be afraid. You are the future of Syria.”

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Wixaritari - Guardians of the Earth
San Andres Cohamiata, Jalisco
By Fernanda Paredes
15 Jan 2014

Wixaritari
“The Healing People” as they call themselves.

For centuries, hidden away from the modern world and protected by the natural barrier the mountains afforded, the Wixaritari have performed ceremonial rituals they believe heal the Earth and keep nature balanced.

They are one of the last pre-Hispanic alive cultures in Latin America, despite the Spanish colonization and the advance of the Mexican society, they have kept their culture, rituals and their ancient way of living.

The Huicholes embroider their clothing with the symbols of nature which offer them strength and life: the flower, a prayer for rain; the deer, a request for love and bounty of their nature-deities; the scorpion, to ask their protection.

Living in harmony in healthy communities that could serve as models in a troubled world, their cooperative lifestyle is rooted in a native spirituality that is reflected in their inspiring colorful dress, diverse art forms, ancient shamanic practices, and mythical ceremonial traditions.

There is so much to be learned from the healthy communities and balanced way of life that characterize the few remaining traditional cultures like the Huichol who have miraculously survived against all odds into the modern age.

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SPLA: We did not attack on the humani...
Rubkona, South Sudan
By Samir Bol
15 Jan 2014

Peacekeeping force from Mongolia guarding Rubkona airport.

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South Sudan in Crisis 15
Juba, South Sudan
By Samir Bol
14 Jan 2014

Internally displaced family from the peripheral areas of Juba, now residing in churches in the city in order to flee the conflict.

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Ramallah Today
Ramallah, Palestine
By Transterra Editor
13 Jan 2014

A collection of images of daily life and suffering under occupation in Palestine.

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In Akkar 5
Halba, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
11 Jan 2014

Young children are the most able to learn foreign languages, and thus to integrate the Lebanese school system. According to the minister of Education, 40 000 Syrian children follow the morning shift and 45 000 the second shift, in the afternoon, of the Lebanese school system. "But because of the language, many children enter a grade much below their real level. I saw a Syrian girl who repeated her grade for the third consecutive year because of English. The Lebanese system lacks of flexibility", affirms Maha Shuayb, director of the Center for Lebanese Studies, specialized in education.

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In Akkar 3
Halba, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
11 Jan 2014

While men are building the camp, settling electricity and wood-burning stoves, women take care of their youngest children and prepare food. Most of the families don't have any home to come back to. Should they have to stay in Lebanon, their children's education would be the only way for them to obtain a decent life. This mother's girl is going to a vocational training of nursing in Halba. She hopes her daughter will be able to work soon.

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In Akkar 2
Halba, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

While children are at school in the camp, teenagers are building a house for a Lebanese family next to the camp, where they have to rent the field to its owner: "They don't pay us for this work. Because we are Syrians!", explains one of the worker, a former farmer who shows pictures of his house in Qusayr, full of cows and goats on his phone, with a melancolic smile.

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In Akkar 8
Halba, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

In the camp near Halba, the Syrian community built everything, from the school to the tents. They are now extending it with six new small houses to face winter. For the children and teenagers working in construction, Relief&Reconciliation is beginning a program of extra tutoring, to avoid their definitive removal from school.

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In Akkar 4
Halba, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

Food, shelter, money for clothes... Education is not on the top list of priorities for many refugee families who have to struggle in their everyday life. Investing money to register their children at school is sometimes impossible in these conditions.

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In Akkar 1
Halba, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

The first barrier for Syrian education is language: “Syrian children - especially those above 12 years old- face challenges as they would be completely adapted to the Syrian curriculum- when studying the Lebanese curriculum. In Syria, all subjects are taught in Arabic while either French or English are the language of instruction in Lebanon”, explains Aseel Jammal Caballero, from UNHCR. In the camp, young children learn very fast, according to their French and English volunteer teachers. But the older ones usually have to help adults to work, in construction for boys, nurse or couture for girls.

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In Akkar 9
halba, lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

“Most of the children had to walk for more than 15km under the bombing of Assad’s regime from Qusayr to Arsal, in Lebanon”, explains Friedrich Bokern, founder of Relief&Reconciliation.

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In Akkar 6
halba, lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

Mustapha was a teacher in Qusayr. Long enough to design books and exercise books for the children of the camp. Here, Syrians did not wait for NGO’s: since they arrived in Lebanon two years ago, they built two school classes in the camp. All their children get up at 8 am to sing their lesson in Arabic or memorize mathematic rules.

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In Akkar 10
halba, lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

Just before arriving to Halba, the capital of Akkar, the car of the French volunteer teacher from Relief&Reconciliation turns left. Among the agricultural fields, a Syrian camp have been settled to host hundreds of families from Qusayr and Homs. Every day, the children receive French and English lessons for free from the NGO's teachers.

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South Sudanese artists organized a co...
Juba , South Sudan
By Samir Bol
09 Jan 2014

Juba 10/1/2014 : A number of artists organized a concert for peace and unity in South Sudan, and the ceremony, which was held, which looked at ten in the morning until six in the evening at the tomb of Dr. John Garang, Photo By Samir Bol

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South Sudan in Crisis 8
Juba, South Sudan
By Samir Bol
09 Jan 2014

Juba, South Sudan. Since the 15th of December 2013 when the conflict started in South Sudan, many of the residents of the peripheral areas in Juba fled their homes and resorted to churches. A family at the Kator Catholic Cathedral in Juba. According to the United nations more than 1,000 people were killed and 355 thousand people had been displaced in South Sudan since the outbreak of the conflict.

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South Sudan in Crisis 9
Juba, South Sudan
By Samir Bol
09 Jan 2014

Children of a internally displaced family from Juba.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

Young Syrian boy that fled two months ago with his mother from the town of Al Qusair after fighting broke out between the Syrian army and Opposition groups. The town is a strategic border town used for transporting supplies and weaponry for opposition groups. The boy and his family now live in a tent un an unregistered refugee camp between the borders of Lebanon and Syria. They can not afford to live in the near by town of Arsal land plots and housing has gone up tremendously since the influx of Syrian displaced that started over a year ago.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

Ahmad, 11 lost his arm and his father when the Syrian army bombarded his home town of Al Qusair with mortars and artillery. Doctor Batley examines his amputated arm and sends a photo to get a second opinion on possible surgery. Ahmad and his mother now live in the area between Lebanon and Syria.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal,Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
21 Dec 2013

A group of young men listen and discus the situation between the opposition and Jabat al Nusra fighters. The men here fled Syria less than three months ago. They are working in a motor bike repair shop in Arsal.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

This man fled Syria with his family but returns to rejoin his FSA unit that is currently in clashes around the town of Qalamoun. There were opposition fighters throughout Arsal and the displaced camps. It is rumored that this area is a busy smuggling route for weapons and supplies to the Free Syrian Army and Jabat al Nusra.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

Window reflection of a vehicle that was embarking to the near by Syrian border on its way to Damascus.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

The Lebanese for Syrians donated portable toilets the the camp in hopes of better hygiene for the displaced syrians living there.