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Migrants (32 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

One of the migrants bed. This old building gives some shelter for the weather. And because only few migrants sleeps here the police have not found the place yet.

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Migrants (31 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Afghan boys, fleeing from war and poverty in their homeland, sleep under old train wagons and in tents in the outskirts of the French port city of Calais. Facing nightly police harrasment and being fully dependent on charity organisations, they are waiting to gain passage to Britain either by help of a human smuggler or by clinging unto the underside of a lorry.
Wahid, age 19. He fled Afghanistan because of Taleban. He had been in Calais 4 months.

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Migrants (30 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Migrant trying to get cover for the rain in the 'jungle'. The 'jungle' are the place where the migrants are sleeping at night. Since the French police cleared and then bulldozed the makeshift forest camp - known as the "Jungle" - near the northern city of Calais the migrants have been force to sleep on the street, under bridges and in the area of the trains.

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Migrants (29 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Migrants trying to get cover for the rain in the 'jungle'. The 'jungle' are the place where the migrants are sleeping at night. Since the French police cleared and then bulldozed the makeshift forest camp - known as the "Jungle" - near the northern city of Calais the migrants have been force to sleep on the street, under bridges and in the area of the trains.

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Migrants (28 of 43)
calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Migrants trying to get cover for the rain in the 'jungle'. The 'jungle' are the place where the migrants are sleeping at night. Since the French police cleared and then bulldozed the makeshift forest camp - known as the "Jungle" - near the northern city of Calais the migrants have been force to sleep on the street, under bridges and in the area of the trains.

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Migrants (27 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Migrant trying to get cover for the rain in the 'jungle'. The 'jungle' are the place where the migrants are sleeping at night. Since the French police cleared and then bulldozed the makeshift forest camp - known as the "Jungle" - near the northern city of Calais the migrants have been force to sleep on the street, under bridges and in the area of the trains.

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Migrants (25 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Migrant trying to get cover for the rain in the 'jungle'. The 'jungle' are the place where the migrants are sleeping at night. Since the French police cleared and then bulldozed the makeshift forest camp - known as the "Jungle" - near the northern city of Calais the migrants have been force to sleep on the street, under bridges and in the area of the trains.

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Migrants (24 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Migrants trying to get cover for the rain in the 'jungle'. The 'jungle' are the place where the migrants are sleeping at night. Since the French police cleared and then bulldozed the makeshift forest camp - known as the "Jungle" - near the northern city of Calais the migrants have been force to sleep on the street, under bridges and in the area of the trains.

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Migrants (22 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Young afghan boys are being arrested by the police. These boy sleep in a tent under one of the brigdes. The boys where imprison undtil next morning.

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Migrants (21 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Young afghan boys are being arrested by the police. These boy sleep in a tent under one of the brigdes. The boys where imprison undtil next morning.

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Migrants (20 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Young afghan boys are being arrested by the police. These boy sleep in a tent under one of the brigdes. The boys where imprison undtil next morning.

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Migrants (19 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

Young afghan boys are being arrested by the police. . The boys where imprison undtil next morning.

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Migrants (18 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

A french policeman where killed by a car early this year during one of the nightly chases after the migrants. Most of the time the migrants are trying to run away from the police on to the other side of the freeway to hide in the bushes.

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Migrants (14 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

In Calais they are completely dependent on the solidarity of charity organizations which organize food distribution three times a day. One should think twice, however, before providing assistance to the migrants, which according to French law is punishable with up to five years of imprisonment and a 30,000 euros fine.

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Migrants (12 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

The migrants get a fast wash before the breakfast.

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Migrants (10 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
02 Apr 2010

The migrants get a fast wash before the breakfast.

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The Ritual Celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2010

Taranto-Italy- April 01th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street. In the picture you can see:
Holy Thursday. Posta or couple of perdune. Confraternita del Carmine. Piazza Giovanni XXIII

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The Ritual celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2010

Taranto-Italy- April 01th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street.

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The Ritual celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2010

Taranto-Italy- April 01th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street.

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The Ritual celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2010

Taranto-Italy- April 02th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street. In the picture you can see:
A seller of statuettes

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The Ritual celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2010

Taranto-Italy- March April 01th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street.

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The boy
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
01 Apr 2010

An estimated number of five million illegal migrants live and work in the European Union. A number growing with at least 500.000 each year, despite great efforts by the EU, and in particularly the border states Spain, Greece and Italy, to prevent them from entering the EU.
In an area in the outskirts of Calais which goes by the name “the jungle", Afghan children and adolescents as young as 12 years of age, wash themselves in the waste water of the local factory.
They seek shelter and try to keep warm under blankets in the bushes and in tents donated by local charity organizations. It has been a very long and harsh winter. Should the migrants by any chance have assumed to have reached a peaceful place to rest after fleeing the war in Afghanistan, they have very soon been met by a quiet different reality. In the jungle of Calais the Afghan boys also seek shelter from a different power: the local riot police.

This young afghan boy is 12 years old and have done the trip from Afghanistan on his own.

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Migrants (17 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
01 Apr 2010

Evening in the 'Jungle'. The migrants gather around the fire to keep warm.

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Migrants (6 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
31 Mar 2010

The days goes in circles. Time is spendt on waiting for the next free meal and the next oportunity for getting to England. Most of the time the migrants are staying close to the food distribution. Doing nothing.

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Volcano Eruption in Iceland, Fimmvord...
Reykjavik
By Brynjar Gunnarsson
30 Mar 2010

Volcano Eruption in Iceland, Fimmvorduhals. This eruption is between Eyjafjallajokull and Myrdalsjokull.

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Thomas Louis Gilzean
Edinburgh
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Thomas Louis Gilzean, a Scottish WWII veterans who fought both in Asia as part of a commando outfit and in Europe against the Germans.

"In Benghazi we lived inside a very nice hotel with my unit," he said. "We fought there until March 1941, when the Germans invaded with Rommel. We soon had to retreat but before we booby-trapped the hotel, and took the fireplace with us. It looked expensive."

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Ante Vukovich
Dubrovnik
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Ante Vukovich is a Croatian WWII veteran who fought against German forces occupying his country during the Second World War. Ante fought with Communist partisan units as an infantryman.

"During my first firefight I couldn't control my Czech machine gun and almost shot one of my fellow soldiers," he said.

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Bernard du Bois
Vilvoorde
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Bernard du Bois is a Belgium WWII veteran who fought with the Allies against German troops occupying his country.

"After being wounded by a Stuka attack, I was picked up by Germans who brought me to a German field hospital in Montreuille-sur-mer, where a German army doctor operated on me atop 12 hundred liter barrel of Champagne," he said. "He saved my life."

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Salomon Freidlyand
Brooklyn, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Salomon Freidlyand is a Byelorussian WWII veteran who fought within the Red Army on the Russian front against the German invader.

"I was sent back to the 297th division to start training partisans and to gather information on the German positions," he said. "I had my own horse, and would often go behind German lines and meet these locals and partisans."

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Thomas Hermann
Sicklerville, NJ
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Thomas Hermann is a WWII veteran who fought in the German army on the Russian front as an infantryman.

"I took part of a counter-attack in late November 1943," he said. "The entire regiment was send forward. The fighting was hard with many close-quarter battles. Two Russian divisions were wiped out in the process. During the fighting, I remember that I could see the white of my enemies eyes."

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Herbert Drossler
Verson
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Herbert Drossler was a loader in a German Tiger tank during the battle of Normandy against American forces.

"Near Vires during a British offensive only 60 meters away, I noticed a dying French civilian between the lines," he said. "He was shouting, 'mother, mother help me' and was wounded in the stomach by shrapnel. I then saw his mother run towards him, so I decided to help her to stop the blood coming out of her son's wound."

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Bjorn Ostring
Oslo
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Bjorn Ostring is an ex Waffen SS Norwegian volunteer who fought as a platoon leader on the Russian front.

"We arrived to the front near the town of Urizk," he said. "As soon as we arrived at the front, we were thrown into the battle to contain Russian troops attacking the area."

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Fernand Kaisergruber
Brussels
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Fernand Kaisergruber is a Belgium WWII veteran who fought in the Waffen SS as an infantryman on the Russian front.

"One day in late 1941, I overheard that two Flemish men had joined the Waffen SS to go fight in Russia," he said. "I talked to my boss and told him that I wanted to do the same. I therefore had the choice between the Waffen SS or the SS Wallonie. I chose the SS Wallonie."

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Adolph Straka
Ljubljana
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Adolph Straka is a Slovenian who fought as a volunteer in the German army against the Russians in Europe, and with alongside the Red army.

"When the Russian took me as prisoner, I was identified as a Yugoslavian, so I got better treatment," he said. "I remained prisoner of war for only three days, and I then swore to Stalin, my name was changed to Rudy, as I bore the same first name as Adolph Hitler."

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Jean Mathieu
Languimberg
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Jean Mathieu is a French national who was forced into the German army to fight against the advancing Russians during WWII.

"With the coming of the Germans, I remained at the family home, he said," but because I was a peasant, the Germans left me alone until 1942, when I was sent to Northern Bavaria to a work camp."

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Giovanni Doretta
Saint-Denis
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Giovanni Doretta who in an elite mountain unit in Russia as part of the Italian army on the Russian front.

"In August 1942 the division was sent to the Russian front, to the Caucasus," he said. "We took the train to the Ukrainian city of Izium, but counter-orders were sent by the Germans, and we had to unload and walked 300 kilometers to the Don front near Stalingrad."

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The Ritual celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
28 Mar 2010

Taranto-Italy- March 28th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street.