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بعد قرار التقاعد القسري ... الموظفين ...
gaza
By ramzi
20 Aug 2029

تقرير| بعد قرار التقاعد القسري ... الموظفين يعيشون اوضاع حياتية صعبة - رمزي أبو جزر ‏

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Inside Chernobyl
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
23 Feb 2021

On April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions have lead to greatest nuclear disaster of mankind. In the aftermath more than 200,000 people had be evacuated, 50,000 people alone from the town of Pripyat. This reportage explores the aftermath 35 years after the catastrophe, exploring the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl with its four different units (including infamous control room 4, where the fatal decisions happened). It also explores abandoned towns, the ghost-town of Pripyat. There are portraits of one of the last resettlers, elderly people who decided to live in the Zone.

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Inside Chernobyl: 35 years after mank...
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
23 Feb 2021

On April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions have lead to greatest nuclear disaster of mankind. In the aftermath more than 200,000 people had be evacuated, 50,000 people alone from the town of Pripyat. This reportage explores the aftermath 35 years after the catastrophe, exploring the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl with its four different units (including infamous control room 4, where the fatal decisions happened). It also explores abandoned towns, the ghost-town of Pripyat. There are portraits of one of the last resettlers, elderly people who decided to live in the Zone.

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Inside Chernobyl: 35 years after mank...
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
23 Feb 2021

On April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions have lead to greatest nuclear disaster of mankind. In the aftermath more than 200,000 people had be evacuated, 50,000 people alone from the town of Pripyat. This reportage explores the aftermath 35 years after the catastrophe, exploring the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl with its four different units (including infamous control room 4, where the fatal decisions happened). It also explores abandoned towns, the ghost-town of Pripyat. There are portraits of one of the last resettlers, elderly people who decided to live in the Zone.

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Inside Chernobyl: 35 years after mank...
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
23 Feb 2021

On April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions have lead to greatest nuclear disaster of mankind. In the aftermath more than 200,000 people had be evacuated, 50,000 people alone from the town of Pripyat. This reportage explores the aftermath 35 years after the catastrophe, exploring the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl with its four different units (including infamous control room 4, where the fatal decisions happened). It also explores abandoned towns, the ghost-town of Pripyat. There are portraits of one of the last resettlers, elderly people who decided to live in the Zone.

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2021_Chernobyl-5356
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Posters and billboards for the May, 1st parade were stored inside a building in Pripyat and are still visible 35 years after the nuclear disaster.

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2021_Chernobyl-5377
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

An abandoned car in front of Pripyats firestation where the first emergency calls were received following the explosion of Reactor one inside the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5388
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Thousands of vehicles have been used during the intense cleanup following the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl. All the vehicles were extremly contaminated. There were different graveyards, some of them have been illeagally stripped for scrap metal, others were later buried in the ground. This image is taken in a vehicle-graveyard next to the firestation in Pripyat.

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2021_Chernobyl-5330
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The famous ferry wheel of Pripyat. The amusment park was scheduled to open on May 1st, 1986 but due to the nulcear disaster following the explosion of Reactor one at the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl, the amusement park was never opend and used.

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2021_Chernobyl-5335
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The famous ferry wheel of Pripyat with abandoned buildings in the background. The amusment park was scheduled to open on May 1st, 1986 but due to the nulcear disaster following the explosion of Reactor one at the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl, the amusement park was never opend and used.

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2021_Chernobyl-5340
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Part of Pripyat's amusement park. The amusment park was scheduled to open on May 1st, 1986 but due to the nulcear disaster following the explosion of Reactor one at the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl, the amusement park was never opend and used.

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2021_Chernobyl-5316
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

An abandoned tower building in the streets of Pripyat with a hammer and sickle emblem on the top of the 16 story building. Pripyat was once home to 50,000 people but is a ghost town since the nuclear disaster of Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5378
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Thousands of vehicles have been used during the intense cleanup following the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl. All the vehicles were extremly contaminated. There were different graveyards, some of them have been illeagally stripped for scrap metal, others were later buried in the ground. This image is taken in a vehicle-graveyard next to the firestation in Pripyat.

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2021_Chernobyl-5383
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Thousands of vehicles have been used during the intense cleanup following the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl. All the vehicles were extremly contaminated. There were different graveyards, some of them have been illeagally stripped for scrap metal, others were later buried in the ground. This image is taken in a vehicle-graveyard next to the firestation in Pripyat.

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2021_Chernobyl-5280
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Remains of the stained glass facade of Café Pripyat are seen through a broken window inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Pripyat, once a town of 50,000 residents, became a ghost town after evacuation following the explosion of Nuclear Reactor Number Four at the Chernobyl Power Plant.

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2021_Chernobyl-5228
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5275
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Remains of the stained glass facade of Café Pripyat are seen through a broken window inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Pripyat, once a town of 50,000 residents, became a ghost town after evacuation following the explosion of Nuclear Reactor Number Four at the Chernobyl Power Plant.

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2021_Chernobyl-5200
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The supermarket in the abandoned town of Prypjat. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5221
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Pianos stay inside an abandoned market place in the town of Prypjat. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5231
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5212
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5181
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5188
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Visitors walking in the abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5193
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5180
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5172
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Beautiful mosaic in the abandoned town of Prypjat covered in snow. Prypjat used to be home for more than 50,000 people but had to be evacuated and abandoned after the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl.

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2021_Chernobyl-5163
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Snow is falling at the entrance of the infamous Red Forest in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.
. Red Forest gained its name from the colour of the trees after they died following the absorption of high levels of radiation.
. After the nuclear disaster, parts of the Red Forest were bulldozed and buried by liquidators in waste gravevards. The sign in the image is reffering to such a "temporarily" graveyard.
. The site remains one of the most contaminated areas in the world today.

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2021_Chernobyl-5153
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Soviet propaganda grafitti on the wall of a house in Chernobyl-2. DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5146
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5123
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5095
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5069
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5111
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5062
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Abandonend and broken parts of the DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5066
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Abandonend and broken parts of the DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.