Editor's Picks 18 April 2013

Collection with 10 media items created by Editor's Picks

18 Apr 2013 08:00

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Migrants (8 of 43)
calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
05 Apr 2010

Migrants trying to get cover for the rain.
The days goes in circles. Time is spendt on waiting for the next free meal and the next oportunity for getting to England. Most of the time the migrants are staying close to the food distribution. Doing nothing.

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Antigua, Guatemala Celebrates Semana ...
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
29 Mar 2013

Anda returns to the church after hours of procession. During Semana Santa, a number of processions are carried out throughout the day.

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Women Wrestling (4 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Martha La Altena and her sister, Maria la Maldita - real name Maria Mamani Herrera - put on earrings and make up before Martha's fight in El Alto at night. Only women from the Aymara ethnic group wear the distinctive bowler hats that were introduced in the early 1900's.

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Zucchini Protest (9 of 10)
Egypt
By elmasdr
17 Apr 2013

Members of the April 6th Youth Activist Movement protest the incarceration of three other activist members in front of the Egyptian high court .

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Umayyad Mosque
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
05 Apr 2013

The devastation that appears in the courtyard of the Umayyad mosque is a result of the clashes that occurred between the FSA and Syrian Regime.

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Islam
Addicted to Tramadol
From Benghazi
Has spent one month in the clinic

‘I was skateboarding a lot and started taking Tramadol because it means you can skate for longer and don’t get tired.’

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The Light In The Cave (Subtitles)
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
24 Sep 2010

This film features the story of the filmmaker, Suleiman Amanzad, who survived the genocide of the residents of Bamyan province in central Afghanistan by the Taliban in 1999. The filmmaker was four years old when the Taliban captured their village and began massacring people.

His family and other villagers hid themselves in a cave near the village, and this is how they survived the genocide. After that the family of the filmmaker move to Kabul, where Suleiman gets a chance to go to school. He also gets a scholarship from the US Embassy of Kabul and attends one year of high school in the United States.

The film is eight minutes long.

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Red Light Districts: A Story About Pr...
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
By newspoint
29 Sep 2012

Sonagachi is one of Calcutta’s largest red light districts – narrow alleys, lined with small ‘apartments’ and corner stores form a confusing and nightmarish maze. The buildings lean into the street, the roads are crowded, it’s hot. The city seems to want to eat itself. Sonagachi is one of the very few places in India where women have a higher street profile than men. That’s because most of them are prostitutes. Approximately 9000 women, many of them trafficked into the country from Bangladesh or Nepal, work in Sonagachi. Around 60.000 more sex workers are active across Calcutta.

In overcrowded India things don’t come in small measures. Two and a half million women and
children (around 500.000 prostitutes in India are under 16) are working in the country’s sex industry.
More than 5 million people are already HIV positive. Governments, both local and national, do little
to tackle the increasing risk of a large-scale AIDS epidemic. Large red light areas like Sonagachi are
at the centre of a problem that may soon spiral out of control and affect millions of people in Bengal
and the neighbouring state of Bihar. Sex workers are socially shunned and prostitution is illegal,
which makes the women in Sonagachi extremely susceptible to extortion, blackmail, rape or murder
by local gangsters, pimps and the police.

Byte: Sudeshna Basu Mukharjee, Sociologist

Byte: Pinki, Sex worker

“I am living at this place as a mother no one wants to live. I want to make my children’s future bright , When we’ll get older then our children will not going to support us.”

Byte: Juhi Tamang, Teacher

“My mother does not want me to join this field. Till the time I can do work hard, I’ll do.”

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Dérives
Montreal, Canada
By SpiralDragon
31 Oct 2012

Ensglish follows

Réalisé de façon indépendante sans aucune contribution financière, le film Dérives est le résultat de plus de trente heures d'entretiens réalisés avec des citoyennes et des citoyens témoins et victimes d'abus policiers.

Le film est partagé gratuitement depuis le 13 février dernier sur Internet à partir du site web du collectif (www.99media.org), avec l'objectif de nourrir le débat public sur la question de l'exercice de la répression et ses conséquences sociales. Une répression qui fut banalisée - voire encouragée - à la fois par les sphères politiques et médiatiques québécoises.

En un mois, le total des visionnements pour Dérives a atteint la somme de 50 000. Le film a également été diffusé plusieurs fois devant public et sera projeté le samedi 16 mars 2013 dans le cadre du festival Hors Cadre. Il s’agit d’un succès qui dépasse toute espérance pour un film qui n'a fait l'objet d'aucune mention par les médias traditionnels et qui prouve que les créateurs des médias émergents pourront désormais s'affranchir de la nécessité d'une attention médiatique.

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Produced independently without any financial aid, Dérives is the result of more than thirty hours of interview with citizen witnesses, and victims, of police brutality.

The film has been available online for free since February 13th on the collective's website (www.99media.org), with the goal of contributing to the public debate on the issue of repression and its social consequences... repression that has been banalised, even encouraged, by Quebec's political and media spheres.

A month after its release, Dérives has been seen more than 50 000 times. The film has also been screened publicly a number of times and will be featured on Saturday, March 16th 2013 at the Hors Cadre festival. This is an unprecedented success for a Quebec documentary without any traditional media mention, proving the emerging media scene can now overcome the need of mainstream media attention.