Editor's Picks 4 April 2013

Collection with 9 media items created by Editor's Picks

04 Apr 2013 21:00

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

The gold diggers wash the soil during the day and all night, hoping that it reveals the precious metal. The majority of prospectors arrive illegally from neighboring countries like Zimbabwe. The gold nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and rivers where the water is no longer suitable for drinking and the ground infertile. The rivers become heavily polluted from mercury used to extract the gold, poisoning aquatic life in the river and posing a serious health risks for the gold diggers. The diggers work on their own account and after selling the gold they must give half of the money to the owner of the land they found it on.

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"We Resist" _ TRAILER
Buenos Aires, Argentina
By @LatAmSight
21 Apr 2012

ARGENTINA
2011
52min
Directors: Philippe Bernard § Nicolas Mu
Trailer Editor DF: Mariano Melega
Creative Producer: Rebecca Martin

Brief synopsis

Hip-hop: whatever the language, whatever the country, these two words conjure up negative images. Many people see hip-hop only as a musical genre and consider it indelibly linked to violence, drugs and delinquency. Yet the overriding aim of hip-hop as a culture is to unite, educate and spread peace. It does this through four distinct forms of expression: words (rap), music, dance and graffiti. Our documentary examines the rise of hip-hop in a country whose recurrent economic and social crises have left it, too, on the margins. The result is a unique look behind the clichés of Argentina, known abroad largely for football, tango and Evita. We see Buenos Aires, and hip-hop, with new eyes.
Argentina’s turbulent contemporary history, including periods of openness and others of isolation from the outside world, have forced hip-hop musicians and artists to merge influences from abroad with elements of their own national culture. Hip-hop still occupies a niche in Argentina, but it is extremely dynamic and has forged its own identity, rather than simply copying its American or French cousins.
Graffiti artists from France, Brazil or the United States who were unable to give free rein to their artistic expression because of police repression at home, found incredible freedom and acres of white walls in Argentina. They taught their techniques to Argentine graffiti artists who imbued them with their own particular hallmarks: Jaz is one of the precursors of the “grafiteado” style, a mix between graffiti and the home-grown “fileteado” whose flourishes and curlicues are an Argentine tradition, still adorning city buses and signs today. The rapper Mustafa Yoda drew his influence from “payadores” or gaucho minstrels famous for their improvisation, for his freestyle battles. Argentina’s convulsed political, social and economic history continues to inspire the combative lyrics of groups such as Bas Crew or Actitud María Marta. El Guapo appears as the symbol of this successful quest for identity : he unites the past and the future, tango, folk, rock and hip-hop. With his inimitable style, this great collector of tango records plunges us into the Argentina of Carlos Gardel and Astor Piazzola.
This documentary peels back the skin of Argentina. The creativity, dedication and determination of these hip-hop artists are a reflection of a country which continues to advance, despite its political, social and economic difficulties.

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Homelessness in Texas (2 of 9)
Houston, Texas, USA
By dennisyermoshin
19 Dec 2009

Fred developed callous and fungus on his hands and feet, over the years of living on the streets.

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Port Gabtoli (7 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Fear and Ammo in a Texas Suburb (27 o...
Dallas, Texas
By Spike Johnson
01 Sep 2010

"Clack clack clack...clack clack clack," shouts Ralph Severe as he points his camouflaged Kalashnikov assault rifle past his "Survivalism" students, transitions to his pistol and spirals his massive frame to the floor and into a gymnastic roll.

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LP Street Gangs in Citee du Soleil, H...
Cite Soleil, Haiti
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
06 Feb 2013

The Haitian LP Street gang is one of many gangs controlling the various slumps found through out the capital Port-au-Prince in Haiti. Some gangs are more violent then others. The most hardcore ones control their turf using intimidation and violence with guns smuggled to Haiti via the US or South America. Murders are a common site in the Haitian capital where most of the 2.5 million souls live in poverty. Certain parts of Port-au-Prince, like Citee du Soleil are as dangerous as the famous favelas of Rio.
Basha, the leader of the LP Street gang is not just a gang leader, but also a community organizer. As the Haitian government has mostly failed its people after the earthquake of 2010, Basha and his 16 strong groups of soldiers have taken upon themselves to help the people living within his zone of influence. His second hand man, Sam, helps him with all tasks that might be needed to assure the gang’s survival. From acquiring weapons to drugs, or taking cuts on the profit from the local whorehouse, the LP street gang, in that sense resembles many of the other gangs involved in crime in Port-au-Prince. However Basha and his main soldier, Sam, who grew up in Florida, have decided to also help locals but forcing politicians to listen to them.
Basha will spend time organizing meetings with ministers to open their eyes on the current situation people are living in. To this date, tenth of thousands of Haitians still living in tent cities spread out around the capital, adding to the already deep fracture of Haitian society. LP gang members go around the various camps in their zone of influence breaking up fights, easing tensions, or trying to have bathrooms and electricity built in the camps. With some success, the LP street gang has managed to assert its authority on the people.
Other gangs in the capital also control various parts of the capital, with Citee du Soleil, being the most dangerous of all the slums in Port-au-Prince. Citee du Soleil, known for its violence, and gun battles, is also a meeting ground for gangs if discussions are needed. In 2010, right after the earthquake UN troops battled their way inside the area to flush out gang soldiers, killing dozens in the process. Today, the gangs have taken control of the Citee du Soleil slums once more. The LP street gang have, overtime, establish strong connections with the though gangs controlling the area. Deals are made, information is passed long, making sure, and everyone gets a cut of the action.
The LP street gang lead by Basha and his man Sam, are hopeful that Haiti’s future will be bright, but as tensions are rising once more within the small nation, the gangs are ready at all times to make their mark with the use of weapons and extortions. The LPs are no exceptions.

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Bunker Schools in Syria (Part 27 of 35)
Al Bab, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
15 Oct 2012

Following months of routine shelling, the “liberated” Syrian town of Al Bab bands together in an attempt to grasp a bit of normalcy for their children. Since August, six schools have been shelled in Assad’s escalated aerial bombardment, and class has been moved to underground bunkers and basements, adapting to the times. Many parents fear sending their children to school, but now community members are volunteering their time in order to safely get the kids out of the house... and back to school.

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Tens of thousands of children studyin...
Pakistan Administered Kashmir (PAK)
By objectivereporter
03 Mar 2013

Around 2, 800 schools were decimated by an earthquake that hit a large part of northern Pakistan in 2005. The government failed to reconstruct those schools even after 8 years, risking the lives of thousands of children who are forced to take lessons under the open sky in harsh winter and scorching summer. The government claims that it faces a paucity of funds to rebuild decimated schools while on the other hand, critics of government say most funds provided by the international community for rehabilitation have been directed to other projects. Officials say around 200,000 children in areas located above 5000 feet high altitude are compelled to continue study either in wall-less, roofless shelters or worn-out tents. Government claims that 1,100 schools out of total 2, 800 have so far been built while construction work 900 schools has been suspended due to want of funds. The construction work on 700 schools yet to be started. Due to non-availability of funds number of drop out of children have been increased as parents are reluctant to send their children to such schools due to health hazards.
The October 8, 2005 earthquake, which originated in the Himalayan mountains of Pakistan was the worst disaster in the history of the country; it left more than 70,000 dead, injured twice that number, left up to 1 million homeless and 1 million in immediate need of assistance.
The Government of Pakistan estimated that 17,000 children died, 23,000 children suffered disabilities and long-term injuries while more than 39,000 children lost one parent and 1,700 lost both parents. Thousands more were left homeless and vulnerable. Most of children died when they were in schools when earthquake struck the area razing sub-standard constructed schools buildings to ground and burying thousands of children alive

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Dos Americas: The Reconstruction of N...
New Orleans, Lousiana, USA
By upheavalproductions
28 Jan 2011

Post-Katrina reconstruction is still in progress throughout the Gulf Coast, with much of the city of New Orleans still in ruins. Set two and half years following the hurricane, this documentary focuses on those rebuilding this city, through interviews with some of the estimated 100,000 Latino migrant laborers who converged in this area after the storm. Despite terrible working conditions, massive fraud, a housing crisis, severe harassment by law enforcement, and very limited resources, New Orleans’ Latino community has mushroomed since the storm and is establishing an infrastructure proportional to its size.

Take a look at how this community is organizing to defend itself against numerous injustices and the attempts to bridge the gap between themselves as new residents and the pre-Katrina population, all within the extremely unique and tragic context of post-Katrina New Orleans.