DIFFICULT EID FOR SYRIANS & EGYPTIANS - Editor's Picks 25 Oct 2012

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25 Oct 2012 00:00

Though Eid is a time for celebration, many Muslims are facing the challenges of economic struggles and war, dampening the holiday spirit. In Syria, families hope for a respite from the violence, while in Egypt storekeepers are hoping for business.

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Skyrocketing Food Prices Ahead Of Mus...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
25 Oct 2012

Skyrocketing prices hit Egyptians ahead of the big Muslim holiday, the Feast of Sacrifice (Eid Al-Adha), particularly the prices of meat, vegetables and fruits, which Egyptians buy in exceptionally large quantities on this occasion.

Muslims in Egypt and worldwide buy sacrificial animals, whether a cow, ram, goat, etc, to slaughter on the first day of the Feast, known by Muslims as Eid, but those who cannot afford it just buy meat to cook and share with family members.

The kilogram of meat used to vary from 35 to 40 Egyptian pounds, but on these days it has exceeded 70 pounds, which is not affordable by a lot of Egyptians, 40% of which live under poverty line. [1 USD = 6.1 EGP]

Egyptian butchers complain that the difficult financial conditions of the people reflected in their selling.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.”

Rising prices didn’t stop at meat, but the prices of vegetables and fruits also recorded notable increase.

Some vegetable and fruit sellers say that the Eid eve used to be a prime selling season before the revolution, and that this year the selling on this day is just like other days.

Egyptian customers now reduce the quantities of food they used to buy for such an occasion, whether it is meat, fruits or vegetables.

Some see that food prices are incredibly higher this year while others see that they are reasonable.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.”

A few hours before the big Muslim holiday kicks off, Egyptians, 90% of whom are Muslims, hope that the new president and his government fulfill their promises regarding improving people’s standard of living and financial conditions, boosting economy and reducing poverty.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 25, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 25, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, a bridge and traffic in Cairo
2. Various shots at a butcher’s, butchers chopping and slicing meat, a customer waiting
3. Various shots of cows at a stockyard
4. Pan right, a man dragging a cow
5. Various shots of sheep at a stockyard in the street
6. Various shots of customers at a butcher’s
7. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.” 8. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits
9. Various shots of fruits displayed for sale on stands in the marketplace, including peaches, pineapples, mangoes, etc
10. Various shots of a fruit seller
11. Various shots of tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes and other vegetables displayed for sale in the marketplace
12. Various shots of the vegetable seller
13. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace
14. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits displayed for sale
15. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.” 16. Pan right, an old man buying something at the marketplace
17. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace