DOCUMENTARY COLLECTION - Editor's Picks

Collection with 13 media items created by Editor's Picks

16 Jul 2013 10:00

TRANSTERRA is becoming more than just a marketplace where producers can showcase and sell their documentaries. We are a resource for archive footage, and a community that provides collaboration opportunities.

The documentaries shown here are part of TRANSTERRA's greater catalog of options. Full-length screenings are available for most, and you can access these by sending an e-mail request to [email protected].

North America
MENA
Egypt (6) Libya (1) Morocco (1) Palestine (1)

Sub-Saharan Africa
Central Asia
Southeast Asia
East Asia

Documentary North America Mena Sub Saharan ... Central Asia Southeast Asia East Asia Trailer Preview Produced Editor's Picks

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Dos Americas: The Reconstruction of N...
New Orleans, Lousiana, USA
By upheavalproductions
28 Jan 2011

Post-Katrina reconstruction is still in progress throughout the Gulf Coast, with much of the city of New Orleans still in ruins. Set two and half years following the hurricane, this documentary focuses on those rebuilding this city, through interviews with some of the estimated 100,000 Latino migrant laborers who converged in this area after the storm. Despite terrible working conditions, massive fraud, a housing crisis, severe harassment by law enforcement, and very limited resources, New Orleans’ Latino community has mushroomed since the storm and is establishing an infrastructure proportional to its size.

Take a look at how this community is organizing to defend itself against numerous injustices and the attempts to bridge the gap between themselves as new residents and the pre-Katrina population, all within the extremely unique and tragic context of post-Katrina New Orleans.

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Letters to my (Former) Enemy
USA
By benoit.faiveley
11 Oct 2011

Letters to My (Former) Enemy is a documentary film directed by Benoit Faiveley and is currently in production. Contact [email protected] for more information

The characters in the Documentary:
Mary is the mom of a soldier who went to Iraq twice. He is now recovering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Mary is also the woman who inspired the idea for this documentary.

Chanan, Seth and Jeremiah are veterans. Chanan is now hanging out with anti-war people. He is studiying to be a nurse. Seth has a very American hobby: firearms. He also works at the Coffee Strong café, a place he opened near a military base. Jeremiah is a Republican who used to think “Bush was too much of a lefty.” He is studying to be an actor.

These Americans will interact with four Iraqis : Baqir, Ahmed, All’a and Mohy. Baqir is a doctor. He requested political asylum in Sweden when four of his brothers were arrested by the American troops. Ahmed fought in the Mahdi Army while his brother was an interpreter for the American forces. The two “brothers at war” now live in Stockholm. All’a is a Baathist and is nostalgic for the Saddam Hussein Era... even though he’s a Shiite. Mohy has always been against : against the Baath party, against Saddam, against the U.S. He is a former communist. In contrast, Haider keeps supporting the American intervention, even if Baghdad remains in a mess today...

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Uprising Preview
Cairo, Egypt
By f.stanton
16 Apr 2012

In January 2011, millions of Egyptians took to the streets in a spontaneous eruption against thirty years of oppression under the regime of Hosni Mubarak. Communicating via Facebook and Twitter, the largely peaceful protesters braved tear gas, beatings, and live bullets in the hope of facing down security forces and overthrowing the government. Over eight hundred lost their lives, and several thousand were arrested and tortured by security forces.
“Uprising” tells the story of the Egyptian revolution from the perspective of those who participated, their struggle for freedom against tremendous odds, their sacrifice, and the courage and ingenuity that allowed them to succeed. Using footage of the revolution as well as interviews with key organizers and participants, “Uprising” provides a behind-the scenes view of one of the most dramatic events of our generation. Many of those profiled were arrested, some were tortured, several were shot. All of them describe it as the most meaningful and rewarding event of their lives. The film explores the frustrations that had built for decades, the role of social media in unleashing the revolution, the youth and courage that changed a nation, and the implications for the future. Their success in forcing the downfall of the regime, one of the most significant foreign policy developments since the fall of the Berlin Wall, has changed the face of the Middle East and provided hope for millions of oppressed people across the world. The Egyptian revolution was unique, in its use of technology, in its youth, and in its scale, and it happened at the heart of a region that is especially important and fragile. Above all, it is a story of profound hope, of courage rewarded, of a people who in a spontaneous, peaceful eruption beat back a police state and threw off the shackles of decades of degradation and oppression.

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Registered Dangerous Trailer
Egypt
By khalil_raof
20 Apr 2011

A trailer for Registered Dangerous, a one hour documentary about the criminal underclass in Egypt.

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Preserving Old Cairo: One Egyptian's ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
11 Nov 2011

A short documentary about a resident of an historic building in Cairo, and his defiance toward authorities who would destroy it. Directed by Ahmed Salih

00:00-01:55
"This work is dedicated to my mother who taught me loving people and life." A sign referring to "Ahmed Maher Basha Street"
01:55-05:22
My name is Salah-ElDin Ali Mohamed, born in building no. 5 at El Karabeiah alley in Darb Ahmar. The building in which I live is a historical one, and considered one of the oldest in Fatimid Cairo. It was built before 1900 which makes it almost 120 years old. It is also considered an architectural piece of art built in Ottoman style, which is a 'rare' kind of architecture. The building is somehow luxurious in an aesthetic way but it was the most common feature in that kind of architecture at that time. It was built at a time when electricity and water were not as reachable as today, so they designed it in a way to allow sun-light to enter the house as long as possible; sun-light was used as 'normal' lighting system for the houses from dawn to dusk. Moreover, moon-light was also considered as a lighting system in the evenings, with an aesthetic view. The reason for the beautiful light rays that filled the houses whether day or night is the colored glass on the windows, which is a very natural element using sun-light and moon-light to create beautiful shadows. This building has many pioneers and it gets photographed all the time by tourists or Agha Khan Organization or organizations related to heritages. This building, in specific, is well-known worldwide. The government should care more about the value of this building and engineering students should come here and be given lectures about the art of architecture and study how it was built and how the walls come together that way. It is a 'rare' beautiful piece of art.
06:50-07:32
A place like Darb Ahmar should be a preserved touristic area in which only pedestrians are allowed to pass by; streets should be designed in a way related to the historical period, and thus it would be invested in tourism to become another source of income instead of destroying these historical buildings and losing our history in order to build a bigger building to gain more money.
08:29-10:33
This building has been sold to someone twenty years ago. Although I was born in this building, I do not know who built it. Twenty years ago, the heirs of that owner came to the building and sold it to someone who was living in the ground floor which I do not know much about; I only see people coming and going to the ground floor every now and then. Later on, I discovered that these people where trying to ruin the walls since such an old building needs years to be destroyed. One day, I heard great noise and I went down to see what was happening, and I saw a great part of the ceiling of the ground floor destroyed. However, the way it was done must have been based on some studies because tearing down the ceiling led to the damage of other two of the walls next to it. I wish to see this building like it used to be and I'm willing to tell the officials every story about the building. Only then would I be at peace.
10:48-11:41
My name is Omar Salah-ElDin, the son of Haj Salah. I was born and raised in Fatimid Cairo, and it's hard for anyone born and raised in such a place to live elsewhere. This area is the heritage of this country or rather the whole country. Egypt has always been filled with alleys, and that's what always characterized it. My father, my family and I are strongly attached to that building. My friends as well as I know the value of this place and since we were children we used to come here to study, so it's a great symbol to us. It is hard for us to leave this place because it is our history.

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We Are Egypt
Cairo, Egypt
By lillie
25 Jan 2012

Months before the momentous uprising in Egypt, many talked of a revolution – but no one knew when that day would come.

What we see in the 75 minute film are the highs and lows of the passionate leaders who toiled for years before seeing success from their sacrifice. It is an account of their struggle against extraordinary odds to remove an uncompromising authoritarian regime determined to stay in power.

"We Are Egypt" is the story behind the story of the Arab Spring. If you are interested in licensing this documentary film or in seeing a sneak preview of the full version, please email [email protected]

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'Les eaux cachées' (Hidden Waters) --...
Fez, Morocco
By Joe Lukawski
31 Mar 2012

Trailer (HD) for 'Les eaux cachées' (Hidden Waters), a documentary film about the past, present and future of water in Fez, Morocco.

Directed and Produced by : Joe Lukawski

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Occupation Has No Future
Israel
By upheavalproductions
18 Jan 2011

This film covers the character of Israeli occupation of Palestine. Documenting opinions not usually revealed from both Israelis and Palestinians. A behind the scenes look into how militarism and occupation is implemented in the mindsets of Israeli citizens at a young age. Powerful interviews with Israelis who were once soldiers that are now anti occupation and Palestinians who give personal accounts of life inside the occupation.

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The Light In The Cave (Subtitles)
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
24 Sep 2010

This film features the story of the filmmaker, Suleiman Amanzad, who survived the genocide of the residents of Bamyan province in central Afghanistan by the Taliban in 1999. The filmmaker was four years old when the Taliban captured their village and began massacring people.

His family and other villagers hid themselves in a cave near the village, and this is how they survived the genocide. After that the family of the filmmaker move to Kabul, where Suleiman gets a chance to go to school. He also gets a scholarship from the US Embassy of Kabul and attends one year of high school in the United States.

The film is eight minutes long.

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If You Eat Garlic, You Will Get Full
Heraat, Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
11 Jan 2012

This film features the miserable life of a group of children in the western city of the Heraat province of Afghanistan by showing their work on the streets of the city.

More importantly, it shows the ill behavior of the residents of the city toward these kids. The film shows how they are treated as outcasts in the society, with people not allowing them in the sports fields, shops, and so on.

The film is ten minutes long.

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Hollywood Versus Nollywood, Trailer
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
04 May 2013

Hollywood Contra Nollywood By Tee Jay Dan
APRIL 23, 2013 2 COMMENTS

“Critics should be active participants…propound and participate.” BM Dzukogi.

Nothing said in praise of Nollywood, in whatever fashion or design will invalidate the fact that the industry is threatened with poor funding, low quality production, technical ineptitude, piracy and blighted distribution channels. But we must not dwell on the many sins of Nollywood. We should appraise the industry; analyze her with the genuine hope of rediscovering her lost beauty. We must, stakeholders and consumers alike, collectively and jealously trade ideas and criticism; serve as a galaxy of souls to our very own motion pictures enterprise. I am playing my quota by writing this article in hopes that every reader will play their role by spreading the word until the identified defects are righted!

Here’s a little education on how a proper film industry functions. Top on the chain is THE MONEY nearly bracketed by THE FINDERS.

THE MONEY is further categorized into FILM and TV. The FILM category consists of major studios such as Universal, Disney, Warner Brothers e.t.c, whereas the TV category refers to Cable Networks such ABC, FOX, CBS e.t.c. Like every other business, these studios and Networks are structured with CEOs, Presidents, Creative Executives, Assistants and Business Affairs Executives.

THE FINDERS literally refers to professionals who find talents/stories for the studios/networks. The Finders serves as mediators between studios/networks and the products. Since studio execs are too preoccupied to read through heaps of specs/scripts these guys handle the hunt job. They function just like literary agents in the business of publishing.

It is the collation of these two factions; THE MONEY and THE FINDERS that makes up what is known as Hollywood. There is more to the solid structure of Hollywood but this will suffice for lack of space. Sadly, Nollywood strives on the exact the opposites of these dictates! There is no single Studio in Nigeria! The absence of a skeletal framework is Nollywood’s first and major problem. With a functional structure in place, Nollywood will look sexier to potential investors as investment returns will become guaranteed – only then can we bury the old days of financially constrained productions.

It is funny how the lots of producers in Nollywood believe funding to be the most pressing need that must be remedied if the industry is to be revitalized. They often find out albeit painfully so that even with the billions of the world they cannot make mind blowing movies with only money. In this business of ours it is believed that a good film could be made with a bad cast and poor production but no good film can be made with a bad story. There is no gainsaying the fact that our home videos are pretty predictable because the stories made into films are stereotypes! Any good screenwriter could easily hash out two or more stories from a typical Nollywood flick! Do you feel mentally exhausted after seeing a Nollywood film? This is because your brain is busy trying to patch together the unrelated stories/scenes in our home videos. Our producers need to pay closer attention to stories before they give the green light. Here’s an assignment: watch a Chinese, Bollywood or Hollywood movie without the sound then watch a Nollywood film in the same manner – watch the Nollywood clip first if you like. Then return here and share your experience. Please pick films you have not seen before and remember to mute the sound. Yes, that is the power of a good story of the lack thereof!

Recently I joined camp with Balogun Omo Oba Dayo of Ravernsbourne UK; a Nigerian Filmmaker based in the United Kingdom. In the course of our joint venture I learned a great deal. Nigerians making good movies are either independent producers or our brethren in the Diaspora. Movies like DR. BELLO, LAST FLIGHT TO ABUJA, TWO BRIDES AND A BABY, THE LOST NUMBER by Tony Abulu, Obi Emelonye, Blessing Egbe and Kester Nsirim respectively are clear examples. Oh, there are three kinds of filmmakers in Nigeria; the Nollywood filmmakers, Nigerian Filmmakers in the Diaspora and the Independent filmmakers. It is therefore out of good faith that I propose a conscious romance between these three factions of Filmmakers of Nigerian origin.

Funding is a crucial part of filmmaking especially in Nigeria. Here’s a bitter truth. Over 80% of filmmakers in Nigeria source for production money from marketers in Alaba. These marketers go as far as dictating names for films without reading the scripts! Have you noticed some Nollywood flick with a title that clearly conflicts with the storyline? Now you know why. A similar percentage of the technical crew are a bunch of ‘trial and error’ apprentices who self-graduated or were actually sent forth by their ‘masters’ to wreck Nollywood the more. The camera man you hire for your birthday today might be shooting Nollywood’s next ‘block buster’ tomorrow if he knows a producer or if a friend of his wins a lottery and decides to make a movie. As much as lack of funds is a problem, industry veterans should sign up for professional courses. It doesn’t take a lifetime!

We still suffer some shamefully from poor sound and picture quality in Nollywood. Take the just concluded AMAA 2013 event for instance.

Finally, because Nollywood churns out thousands of movies annually is not a yardstick to say it is without blemish. Popularity isn’t necessarily prosperity so goes the saying. A female Nollywood apologist argued that the industry guys are making big bucks alright hence do not need to up their game. This is laughable. See, in Nigeria pirates earn more than the filmmakers. Forget the paparazzi, safe for some side ‘runs’ our movie stars will be dying in penury. To say Nollywood is fine as it is is a terrible misconception. Let’s have a working structure then we can attract investors. Let’s build a tight knit industry and engage in collaborative ventures so we can make superb movies. Deal with Nigerians in the Diaspora, tackle piracy and pirates head on, mend the rift in AGN, and awaken DGN and SWG from slumber then watch Nollywood bloom.

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Bolivian Female Wrestlers / Multimedia
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Bolivian Wrestlers fight back against the dominant culture of machismo and discrimination. Photo Essay also available: see the image collection here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/928