On Women's Shoulders

Collection with 33 media items created by Berta Tilmantaite

Ecuador 03 Feb 2017 15:06

It is a woman’s task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca. Salasacas mostly live off agriculture, animal husbandry, and handicrafts. Traditionally, women would take care of the house chores and the children, and men would work the fields. As time went by, more and more work would land on women’s shoulders: now their responsibilities are not only housekeeping and taking care of the animals, including gathering kikuyo, but agriculture, too. Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs. Here, men and women wear traditional outfits everyday, obey festive rituals, and do handicrafts: they spin yarn and weave everyday and festive clothes, as well as tapestries, on archaic looms.

Ecuador Women

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are carrying freshly cut grass to feed the animals. The embankment is too steep and too intricate to be worked with mowers and cars. Even the donkeys wait for their burden on the top of the slope; women have to cut the grass by hand and carry it to the top themselves. Some, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is loading the grass on the donkey's back. Some women, who do not own donkeys, carry their burden home on their backs and have to repeat the process several times.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. Strings of fluffy wool slide between their fingers and obediently lie down on swiftly turned spools, which are not unlike integral parts of their hands.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. She constantly spins wool, whenever her hands are free.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) is walking back to the village with a donkey loaded with freshly cut weed. She constantly spins wool, whenever her hands are free.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. Strings of fluffy wool slide between their fingers and obediently lie down on swiftly turned spools, which are not unlike integral parts of their hands.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are walking back to their village with the two donkeys loaded with freshly cut weed. Strings of fluffy wool slide between their fingers and obediently lie down on swiftly turned spools, which are not unlike integral parts of their hands.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50)is walking back to the village with the donkey loaded with freshly cut weed.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is feeding her animals with freshly cut weed, Salasaca, Ecuador.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and a kitten in her land, Salasaca, Ecuador.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. WomenÕs work on the slope Ð that looks like an abyss from above Ð can be dangerous. If they lose their balance or stumble under heavy weights, workers can fall down and roll tens of meters to the ground, dislocate their arms, legs, or suffer other injuries.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. WomenÕs work on the slope Ð that looks like an abyss from above Ð can be dangerous. If they lose their balance or stumble under heavy weights, workers can fall down and roll tens of meters to the ground, dislocate their arms, legs, or suffer other injuries.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. WomenÕs work on the slope Ð that looks like an abyss from above Ð can be dangerous. If they lose their balance or stumble under heavy weights, workers can fall down and roll tens of meters to the ground, dislocate their arms, legs, or suffer other injuries.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Tools that sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) use to cut, bind and carry the weed.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

one of the tools that sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) use to bind and carry the weed.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. WomenÕs work on the slope Ð that looks like an abyss from above Ð can be dangerous. If they lose their balance or stumble under heavy weights, workers can fall down and roll tens of meters to the ground, dislocate their arms, legs, or suffer other injuries.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is picking the corn for dinner after feeding her animals in Salasaca, Ecuador.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are picking the corn for dinner after feeding her animals in Salasaca, Ecuador.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cooking dinner in the kitchen of her house, in Salasaca, Ecuador.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) is walking down to the river to grass grass and spinning wooly ran on the way.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Sisters Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) and Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) are cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. WomenÕs work on the slope Ð that looks like an abyss from above Ð can be dangerous. If they lose their balance or stumble under heavy weights, workers can fall down and roll tens of meters to the ground, dislocate their arms, legs, or suffer other injuries.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Martina Masaquiza Sailema (50) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. The grass is called kikuyo. Women carry it on the backs or load the donkeys with this heavy burda in.

Salasaca district in Tungurava province, Equador, takes up only 12 square kilometers, but has preserved strong identity of the local inhabitants, as well as authentic culture and customs.

Thumb sm
Berta Tilmantaite Photo Ecuador On Wo...
Salasaca
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Apr 2016

Luz Maria Masaquiza Sailema (38) is cutting the grass to feed the animals. It is a womanÕs task to feed and take care of the animals in Salasaca, Ecuador. WomenÕs work on the slope Ð that looks like an abyss from above Ð can be dangerous. If they lose their balance or stumble under heavy weights, workers can fall down and roll tens of meters to the ground, dislocate their arms, legs, or suffer other injuries.