Dying Trades in the Holy Land

Collection with 25 media items created by dafnatal7

04 Sep 2014 04:00

A look at some of Israel's last family businesses, which are being crushed by changing times. For some of the most traditional Jewish and Arab businesses, it won't be long before their doors close for the last time. New technologies, large corporations, and the draw of the modern world mean that the next generation of consumers and the heirs to the businesses no longer have an interest in the businesses' futures.

Israel Holyland Holy Land Business Dying Modern World Watch Maker Bakery History Culture Heritage Palestine Israeli Palestinian Arab Jewish Muslim Christian Jaffa Tel Aviv Jerusalem Nazareth Haifa

Baruch Milgram, a 94 years old watchm...
Tel Aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Baruch Milgram, a 94 year old watchmaker, works in his cupboard like shop in Tel Aviv 6 days a week. His workshop has been in the same place since the 1950’s with little change.

Milgram came from a watch making Jewish family in Romania; he learnt his trade from his father, uncles and grandfather. He started going to the workshop when he was 10 years old and learnt his craft from them. He opened his first shop in Romania in 1945 around the same time that the local government started to close and nationalize shops.

Baruch made his first attempt to come to Israel in 1947 with his brother by trying to pass themselves off as Italians returning home by sea. They were caught by the British and interned in Cyprus before finally reaching Israel in 1949. The rest of his family followed the pair to Israel in 1951.

In his heyday, Milgram boasted clients including the family of David Ben Gurion, the first Israeli Prime Minister. But as the years have passed, the torrent of customers visiting the store on ROAD XXX have slowed to a trickle.

“But I am not doing this for the money” Baruch explains “I just need to work. I am satisfied with my work. I will come as long as I have strength, I cannot stay at home”. Nowadays Milgram prefers to work on European style“Cuckoo” clocks. He tries to avoid the small mechanical wristwatches he once worked on due to his eyesight and dexterity. The 94 year old still takes two buses to reach his shop from his home each morning, as he has done for over 60 years.

Today he has 2 children and 10 grandchildren but is now the last member of his family that practice’s his craft. “My kids have found better things to do and people don’t need to have their clocks fixed any more, everything is digital”.

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Baruch Milgram, a 94 years old watchm...
Tel Aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Baruch Milgram, a 94 years old watchmaker, poses outside his shop in Tel Aviv

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Baruch Milgram, a 94 year old watchma...
Tel Aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Baruch Milgram, a 94 year old watchmaker, shows an old picture of him and his wife in the Bahai Gardens in Haifa

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One of 94 year old Baruch Milgram’s...
Tel Aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Baruch Milgram, a 94 year old watchmaker, works in his cupboard like shop in Tel Aviv six days a week. His workshop has been in the same place since the 1950’s with little change.

In his heyday, Milgram boasted clients including the family of David Ben Gurion, the first Israeli president. But as the years have passed, the torrent of customers visiting the store on ROAD XXX have slowed to a trickle.

“But I am not doing this for the money” Baruch explains “I just need to work. I am satisfied with my work. I will come as long as I have strength, I cannot stay at home”. Nowadays, Milgram prefers to work on European style“Cuckoo” clocks. He tries to avoid the small mechanical wristwatches he once worked on due to his deteriorating eyesight and dexterity. The 94 year old still takes two buses to reach his shop from his home each morning, as he has done for over 60 years.

Today he has 2 children and 10 grandchildren, but is now the last member of his family that practice’s his craft. “My kids have found better things to do and people don’t need to have their clocks fixed any more, everything is digital”.

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Fakhry Geday (now deceased) on the ri...
Jaffa
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

The Al-Kamal pharmacy opened its doors to the old city of Jaffa in 1924, under British rule in Palestine. Yusuf Kamel Geday opened his store after studying to be a pharmacist in Istanbul in 1910. He moved the shop to its current location in 1939, 75 years ago. The pharmacist was imprisoned by the British during the Arab revolt between 1936 and 1939.

His son, Fakhry Geday, was born in the Ajami neighborhood of Jaffa, where the business is still located, and joined the business in 1950. He continued to run the business until he passed away just 6 months ago, when he was 88 years old.

Since then, Yusuf’s 38 year old grandson, who carries the same name as his grandfather, continues to run the business. He joined the family business after studying to be a pharmacist in England. Since his father passed away he has been forced to hire an employee from outside the family. Yusuf has one brother and one sister. Their Mother, who passed away 2010, used to be a housewife and also came to the business to help out.

The business claims a number of famous clients in Jaffa, which is now a fashionable part of what is now Tel Aviv. However, Yusuf adds that “we cannot share their identities for professional reasons.”

Yusuf says that everyone in Jaffa knows his shop and many clients try to keep patronizing him even after they have moved to neighboring cities. “This business is communal and our clients are loyal to the place” Yusuf explains. “So we are not total hostages from the competition from the big chains”. Nevertheless, Yusuf adds that “the businesses that suffer the most in the country are the small businesses; there is too much bureaucracy and red tape to deal with. The municipality and authorities are heavy handed”.

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Yusuf Geday shows the pharmacy busine...
Jaffa
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

The Al-Kamal pharmacy opened its doors to the old city of Jaffa in 1924, under British rule in Palestine. Yusuf Kamel Geday opened his store after studying to be a pharmacist in Istanbul in 1910. He moved the shop to its current location in 1939, 75 years ago. The pharmacist was imprisoned by the British during the Arab revolt between 1936 and 1939.

His son, Fakhry Geday, was born in the Ajami neighborhood of Jaffa, where the business is still located, and joined the business in 1950. He continued to run the business until he passed away just 6 months ago, when he was 88 years old.

Since then, Yusuf’s 38 year old grandson, who carries the same name as his grandfather, continues to run the business. He joined the family business after studying to be a pharmacist in England. Since his father passed away he has been forced to hire an employee from outside the family. Yusuf has one brother and one sister. Their Mother, who passed away 2010, used to be a housewife and also came to the business to help out.

The business claims a number of famous clients in Jaffa, which is now a fashionable part of what is now Tel Aviv. However, Yusuf adds that “we cannot share their identities for professional reasons.”

Yusuf says that everyone in Jaffa knows his shop and many clients try to keep patronizing him even after they have moved to neighboring cities. “This business is communal and our clients are loyal to the place” Yusuf explains. “So we are not total hostages from the competition from the big chains”. Nevertheless, Yusuf adds that “the businesses that suffer the most in the country are the small businesses; there is too much bureaucracy and red tape to deal with. The municipality and authorities are heavy handed”.

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Yaakov Yehuda (81 years old, center),...
Tel Aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

In Albert’s pastry shop you can still taste the home country: marzipan, almond cakes and “kisses” cookies - all made by hand with recipes from the land which the shop’s patriarch left behind.

Albert Yehuda came to Israel from Thessaloniki, Greece in the early thirties as a Zionist pioneer. He opened his store in Tel Aviv in 1935 with a desire to bring a taste of home to his promised land. “Albert was one of the lucky ones” his 81 year old son Yaakov Yehuda says “afterwards the Jewish community in Thessaloniki was wiped out. Many of the wider family and whoever stayed in Greece died during the holocaust.”

The business has been continued by his son Yaakov Yehuda (81 years old), and his wife Levana (72), who are today grandparents themselves. They have 3 children and 6 grandchildren who don’t want to continue the business, but come to help from time to time. “I have a genius grandchild”, says Levana, “I won’t let him enter this old trade”.

“What I like about the business”, Levana explains, “is that we know and grow older with our customers through their whole lives. We have clients whose children Bar-Miztva’s we catered for, and then their weddings and their grandchildren’s ceremonies. They come to buy sweets for every event, the relation is warm and the feeling is very homely”.

“The small traditional family businesses are disappearing and only very deeply rooted people hang on to the last of them, and its a shame” Levana says.

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Yaakov Yehuda (81) in his confectione...
Tel Aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

In Albert’s pastry shop you can still taste the home country: marzipan, almond cakes and “kisses” cookies - all made by hand with recipes from the land which the shop’s patriarch left behind.

Albert Yehuda came to Israel from Thessaloniki, Greece in the early thirties as a Zionist pioneer. He opened his store in Tel Aviv in 1935 with a desire to bring a taste of home to his promised land. “Albert was one of the lucky ones” his 81 year old son Yaakov Yehuda says “afterwards the Jewish community in Thessaloniki was wiped out. Many of the wider family and whoever stayed in Greece died during the holocaust.”

The business has been continued by his son Yaakov Yehuda (81 years old), and his wife Levana (72), who are today grandparents themselves. They have 3 children and 6 grandchildren who don’t want to continue the business, but come to help from time to time. “I have a genius grandchild”, says Levana, “I won’t let him enter this old trade”.

“What I like about the business”, Levana explains, “is that we know and grow older with our customers through their whole lives. We have clients whose children Bar-Miztva’s we catered for, and then their weddings and their grandchildren’s ceremonies. They come to buy sweets for every event, the relation is warm and the feeling is very homely”.

“The small traditional family businesses are disappearing and only very deeply rooted people hang on to the last of them, and its a shame” Levana says.

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Yaakov Yehuda (81) making marzipan in...
Tel Aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

In Albert’s pastry shop you can still taste the home country: marzipan, almond cakes and “kisses” cookies - all made by hand with recipes from the land which the shop’s patriarch left behind.

Albert Yehuda came to Israel from Thessaloniki, Greece in the early thirties as a Zionist pioneer. He opened his store in Tel Aviv in 1935 with a desire to bring a taste of home to his promised land. “Albert was one of the lucky ones” his 81 year old son Yaakov Yehuda says “afterwards the Jewish community in Thessaloniki was wiped out. Many of the wider family and whoever stayed in Greece died during the holocaust.”

The business has been continued by his son Yaakov Yehuda (81 years old), and his wife Levana (72), who are today grandparents themselves. They have 3 children and 6 grandchildren who don’t want to continue the business, but come to help from time to time. “I have a genius grandchild”, says Levana, “I won’t let him enter this old trade”.

“What I like about the business”, Levana explains, “is that we know and grow older with our customers through their whole lives. We have clients whose children Bar-Miztva’s we catered for, and then their weddings and their grandchildren’s ceremonies. They come to buy sweets for every event, the relation is warm and the feeling is very homely”.

“The small traditional family businesses are disappearing and only very deeply rooted people hang on to the last of them, and its a shame” Levana says.

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Yaakov Yehuda (81) in his confectione...
tel aviv
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Yaakov Yehuda (81) in his confectionery in Tel Aviv.

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The Matar brothers: Assad, Jaris and ...
Nazareth
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

The story of the Matar family starts with the father of the family, Iskandar Assad Matar (now deceased) in the year 1930.

Iskandar Assad Matar was born in Sakhnin, Palestine in 1906 and was apprenticed in the traditional copper trade as a teenager.

In 1970, the family’s patriarch moved to Nazareth, where he is survived by his three children: Assad (81), Jaris (78) and Naif (75). The three boys learned the craft from their father and today they are responsible for the business. The son of Assad, called Yusef (55) also joined the business and works with his father and uncles.

They make a verity of copper tools/tableware such as traditional coffee pitcher, kitchenware, lamps and even traditional calendars. Most of the clients are larger businesses like hotels, but in the last 2 years “it has been not so good in the business”.

The 3 brothers have 13 grandchildren all together but none of them will continue the family trade. Yusuf explains that in the recent years the business faced financial difficulties. “There are many factories making cheaper products, which are machine made, and people don’t always know to appreciate handmade copper work and to pay higher price for it”.

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The Matar brothers: Assad, Jaris and ...
Nazareth
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

The story of the Matar family starts with the father of the family, Iskandar Assad Matar (now deceased) in the year 1930.

Iskandar Assad Matar was born in Sakhnin, Palestine in 1906 and was apprenticed in the traditional copper trade as a teenager.

In 1970, the family’s patriarch moved to Nazareth, where he is survived by his three children: Assad (81), Jaris (78) and Naif (75). The three boys learned the craft from their father and today they are responsible for the business. The son of Assad, called Yusef (55) also joined the business and works with his father and uncles.

They make a verity of copper tools/tableware such as traditional coffee pitcher, kitchenware, lamps and even traditional calendars. Most of the clients are larger businesses like hotels, but in the last 2 years “it has been not so good in the business”.

The 3 brothers have 13 grandchildren all together but none of them will continue the family trade. Yusuf explains that in the recent years the business faced financial difficulties. “There are many factories making cheaper products, which are machine made, and people don’t always know to appreciate handmade copper work and to pay higher price for it”.

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Old pictures, certificates and sailin...
Haifa
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

When you enter the “Ogen” or Anchor Pub you cannot avoid 86 years old Yoske Pinkus, sitting by the bar with a sailor hat, a pipe and a beer. The inside of the cafe is a small shrine to a life spent at sea: maritime souvenirs, pictures of old vessels and pages of Yoske’s old passports which fill the walls.

Born in Poland in 1928, Yoske Pinkis found himself trapped in 6 different labor and concentration camps including Auschwitz between 1939-1945. He made his final escape in early 1945 dressed as a German soldier, from the gates of a camp, casually cycling out through the gates.

Pinkas arrived in Israel in 1948, after spending two years in post war France. He came alone. Apart from one brother and one sister, all the rest of his family, including his parents, were murdered during the holocaust. His sister stayed in France until the day she died. His brother escaped the camp with him, but lost contact with him until Yoske found him in the USA in the 50’s. In the 70’s his brother came to Israel where he lives to this day.

Yoske came to Israel in a boat and stayed to work there as a sailor. He was a sailor for 20 years. He got married in 1960 and in 1963 he left the sea (“the kids don’t know who you are” said his wife, who died in 1995). A year later, he bought the “Ogen Cafe” that was operating here since 1942, right beside the port.

Many sailors used to come here and this way Yoske kept his contact with the sailor world even after he left the ships. Today Yoske runs the business with his son, Gili. Gili used to come to the business since he was young and took the management of the place in 1998. He renovated and expanded the place and helped keep it as a successful and atmospheric gathering place with an atmosphere that is both nostalgic and well kept.

Yoske has 2 children and 3 grandchildren who lives in the USA.

Gili tells that the place used to be considered as a “bad area” where you wouldn’t want to walk alone at night. But since 2007 when the municipality has renovated the former docks and the area of the “lower city” of Haifa, has started to transform. Today its quite fashionable and the crowds are mixed young and old, local and from outside the area. We almost need a full time secretary to keep up with the business’s paperwork.

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Yoske Pinkus (86), the founder and ma...
Haifa
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

When you enter the “Ogen” or Anchor Pub you cannot avoid 86 years old Yoske Pinkus, sitting by the bar with a sailor hat, a pipe and a beer. The inside of the cafe is a small shrine to a life spent at sea: maritime souvenirs, pictures of old vessels and pages of Yoske’s old passports which fill the walls.

Born in Poland in 1928, Yoske Pinkis found himself trapped in 6 different labor and concentration camps including Auschwitz between 1939-1945. He made his final escape in early 1945 dressed as a German soldier, from the gates of a camp, casually cycling out through the gates.

Pinkas arrived in Israel in 1948, after spending two years in post war France. He came alone. Apart from one brother and one sister, all the rest of his family, including his parents, were murdered during the holocaust. His sister stayed in France until the day she died. His brother escaped the camp with him, but lost contact with him until Yoske found him in the USA in the 50’s. In the 70’s his brother came to Israel where he lives to this day.

Yoske came to Israel in a boat and stayed to work there as a sailor. He was a sailor for 20 years. He got married in 1960 and in 1963 he left the sea (“the kids don’t know who you are” said his wife, who died in 1995). A year later, he bought the “Ogen Cafe” that was operating here since 1942, right beside the port.

Many sailors used to come here and this way Yoske kept his contact with the sailor world even after he left the ships. Today Yoske runs the business with his son, Gili. Gili used to come to the business since he was young and took the management of the place in 1998. He renovated and expanded the place and helped keep it as a successful and atmospheric gathering place with an atmosphere that is both nostalgic and well kept.

Yoske has 2 children and 3 grandchildren who lives in the USA.

Gili tells that the place used to be considered as a “bad area” where you wouldn’t want to walk alone at night. But since 2007 when the municipality has renovated the former docks and the area of the “lower city” of Haifa, has started to transform. Today its quite fashionable and the crowds are mixed young and old, local and from outside the area. We almost need a full time secretary to keep up with the business’s paperwork.

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Yoske Pinkus (86), the founder and ma...
Haifa
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Yoske Pinkus (86), the founder and manager of Pub “Ha-ogen” in Haifa, in his pub

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Card game between Israeli-Arab men in...
Nazareth
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Inside an old structure resides cafe Abu Salem. Tables and chairs are spread around the space and around them are sitting dozens of men in their late 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s. If you will enter this space- it is not certain they will notice you at all. They are all too focused on the games they are playing.

The place is run by a relatively young man- Wissam Abu Salem who is 37 years old, much younger then his veteran customers.

The Cafe was established by his grandfather Indreus Abu Salem (now deceased) exactly 100 years ago, in 1914. Wissam’s father, George Abu Salem, who was the youngest son in the family, used to join him since he was a small kid and continued after the grandfather died in 1960. In 1990, at an early age, Wissam’s father suddenly died of a heart attack, a disaster for all his family and customers. Then his brother Samih tuned the business. In 2007, the grandchild Wissam asked his uncle to run the place who runs the place today.

Wissam has a second career as a DJ. He used to work as a DJ in parties all over the Holy land- from Tel Aviv to Bethlehem and Ramallah. He still works as a DJ to this very day, but more in Nazareth and the north, occasionally spinning outside the area as well.

The place only serves several kinds of hot and cold drinks, and apart then that it is more of a social club. some of the oldest customs have been coming here since they were 15 years old. The place is an important gathering place for them. 2 years after Wissam started running the business in 2009, he tried to close the place on Sundays but the customers came to his home and rebelled, claiming they have no where else to meet. So Wissam kept it open on Sundays too for half a day.

The language you hear is naturally Arabic. As far as religion-you can find here both Muslim and Christians customers, and even some Jews who come from all over the area. One of them is a Jewish man who was born in Iraq. Is there tension around politic topics? I asked. “here there is no politics” Wissam replied, people come to play and have fun, they don’t even gamble on money, but on the coffee” he says.

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Card game in Abu Salem cafe, Nazareth
Nazareth
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Inside an old structure resides cafe Abu Salem. Tables and chairs are spread around the space and around them are sitting dozens of men in their late 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s. If you will enter this space- it is not certain they will notice you at all. They are all too focused on the games they are playing.

The place is run by a relatively young man- Wissam Abu Salem who is 37 years old, much younger then his veteran customers.

The Cafe was established by his grandfather Indreus Abu Salem (now deceased) exactly 100 years ago, in 1914. Wissam’s father, George Abu Salem, who was the youngest son in the family, used to join him since he was a small kid and continued after the grandfather died in 1960. In 1990, at an early age, Wissam’s father suddenly died of a heart attack, a disaster for all his family and customers. Then his brother Samih tuned the business. In 2007, the grandchild Wissam asked his uncle to run the place who runs the place today.

Wissam has a second career as a DJ. He used to work as a DJ in parties all over the Holy land- from Tel Aviv to Bethlehem and Ramallah. He still works as a DJ to this very day, but more in Nazareth and the north, occasionally spinning outside the area as well.

The place only serves several kinds of hot and cold drinks, and apart then that it is more of a social club. some of the oldest customs have been coming here since they were 15 years old. The place is an important gathering place for them. 2 years after Wissam started running the business in 2009, he tried to close the place on Sundays but the customers came to his home and rebelled, claiming they have no where else to meet. So Wissam kept it open on Sundays too for half a day.

The language you hear is naturally Arabic. As far as religion-you can find here both Muslim and Christians customers, and even some Jews who come from all over the area. One of them is a Jewish man who was born in Iraq. Is there tension around politic topics? I asked. “here there is no politics” Wissam replied, people come to play and have fun, they don’t even gamble on money, but on the coffee” he says.

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Wissam Abu Salem, the manager of Cafe...
Nazareth
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Inside an old structure resides cafe Abu Salem. Tables and chairs are spread around the space and around them are sitting dozens of men in their late 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s. If you will enter this space- it is not certain they will notice you at all. They are all too focused on the games they are playing.

The place is run by a relatively young man- Wissam Abu Salem who is 37 years old, much younger then his veteran customers.

The Cafe was established by his grandfather Indreus Abu Salem (now deceased) exactly 100 years ago, in 1914. Wissam’s father, George Abu Salem, who was the youngest son in the family, used to join him since he was a small kid and continued after the grandfather died in 1960. In 1990, at an early age, Wissam’s father suddenly died of a heart attack, a disaster for all his family and customers. Then his brother Samih tuned the business. In 2007, the grandchild Wissam asked his uncle to run the place who runs the place today.

Wissam has a second career as a DJ. He used to work as a DJ in parties all over the Holy land- from Tel Aviv to Bethlehem and Ramallah. He still works as a DJ to this very day, but more in Nazareth and the north, occasionally spinning outside the area as well.

The place only serves several kinds of hot and cold drinks, and apart then that it is more of a social club. some of the oldest customs have been coming here since they were 15 years old. The place is an important gathering place for them. 2 years after Wissam started running the business in 2009, he tried to close the place on Sundays but the customers came to his home and rebelled, claiming they have no where else to meet. So Wissam kept it open on Sundays too for half a day.

The language you hear is naturally Arabic. As far as religion-you can find here both Muslim and Christians customers, and even some Jews who come from all over the area. One of them is a Jewish man who was born in Iraq. Is there tension around politic topics? I asked. “here there is no politics” Wissam replied, people come to play and have fun, they don’t even gamble on money, but on the coffee” he says.

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Customers joke with each other in the...
Nazareth
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Inside an old structure resides cafe Abu Salem. Tables and chairs are spread around the space and around them are sitting dozens of men in their late 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s. If you will enter this space- it is not certain they will notice you at all. They are all too focused on the games they are playing.

The place is run by a relatively young man- Wissam Abu Salem who is 37 years old, much younger then his veteran customers.

The Cafe was established by his grandfather Indreus Abu Salem (now deceased) exactly 100 years ago, in 1914. Wissam’s father, George Abu Salem, who was the youngest son in the family, used to join him since he was a small kid and continued after the grandfather died in 1960. In 1990, at an early age, Wissam’s father suddenly died of a heart attack, a disaster for all his family and customers. Then his brother Samih tuned the business. In 2007, the grandchild Wissam asked his uncle to run the place who runs the place today.

Wissam has a second career as a DJ. He used to work as a DJ in parties all over the Holy land- from Tel Aviv to Bethlehem and Ramallah. He still works as a DJ to this very day, but more in Nazareth and the north, occasionally spinning outside the area as well.

The place only serves several kinds of hot and cold drinks, and apart then that it is more of a social club. some of the oldest customs have been coming here since they were 15 years old. The place is an important gathering place for them. 2 years after Wissam started running the business in 2009, he tried to close the place on Sundays but the customers came to his home and rebelled, claiming they have no where else to meet. So Wissam kept it open on Sundays too for half a day.

The language you hear is naturally Arabic. As far as religion-you can find here both Muslim and Christians customers, and even some Jews who come from all over the area. One of them is a Jewish man who was born in Iraq. Is there tension around politic topics? I asked. “here there is no politics” Wissam replied, people come to play and have fun, they don’t even gamble on money, but on the coffee” he says.

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Veteran Customers Playing Cards in Ca...
Nazareth
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Inside an old structure resides cafe Abu Salem. Tables and chairs are spread around the space and around them are sitting dozens of men in their late 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s. If you will enter this space- it is not certain they will notice you at all. They are all too focused on the games they are playing.

The place is run by a relatively young man- Wissam Abu Salem who is 37 years old, much younger then his veteran customers.

The Cafe was established by his grandfather Indreus Abu Salem (now deceased) exactly 100 years ago, in 1914. Wissam’s father, George Abu Salem, who was the youngest son in the family, used to join him since he was a small kid and continued after the grandfather died in 1960. In 1990, at an early age, Wissam’s father suddenly died of a heart attack, a disaster for all his family and customers. Then his brother Samih tuned the business. In 2007, the grandchild Wissam asked his uncle to run the place who runs the place today.

Wissam has a second career as a DJ. He used to work as a DJ in parties all over the Holy land- from Tel Aviv to Bethlehem and Ramallah. He still works as a DJ to this very day, but more in Nazareth and the north, occasionally spinning outside the area as well.

The place only serves several kinds of hot and cold drinks, and apart then that it is more of a social club. some of the oldest customs have been coming here since they were 15 years old. The place is an important gathering place for them. 2 years after Wissam started running the business in 2009, he tried to close the place on Sundays but the customers came to his home and rebelled, claiming they have no where else to meet. So Wissam kept it open on Sundays too for half a day.

The language you hear is naturally Arabic. As far as religion-you can find here both Muslim and Christians customers, and even some Jews who come from all over the area. One of them is a Jewish man who was born in Iraq. Is there tension around politic topics? I asked. “here there is no politics” Wissam replied, people come to play and have fun, they don’t even gamble on money, but on the coffee” he says.

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Mati Landner (83) in his bakery in Je...
Jerusalem
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Mati Landner could not have been more connected to his work place than this: he was born right here in the second floor of his bakery in “Beit-Israel” Haredi neighborhood, Jerusalem, 83 years ago. “The floor above the bakery was our home and this is where my father and sisters were born” Mati says.

The street where the bakery is located is named “Lendner Street” after the grandfather that established the bakery and was from the founders of the veteran Jerusalem neighborhood.

The bakery makes only one product: ״Chala” A traditional Jewish bread, which is baked in an old brick oven. The recipe is the same recipe from Romania “with some improvements I added through the years” Mati adds.

The bakery consists of 3 generations: Mati (83), His father Zalman and his grandfather Moshe-Dov.

The grandfather, Moshe Dov Lendner, came to Israel from Romania in 1880. People told him that “you go to the holy land to die not to live” and he replied that he is going to build the land. He came to Israel on foot and with horses and the way was tough. He started to bake bread for the family and due to the demand opened the bakery in 1896, in the same house where the family was living. When Mati’s father, Zalman, was 18 and finished his studies in Yeshiva, his father asked him to take over the business.

Mati had 8 brothers and sisters, Mati is the second before the youngest among them. They were always in business since they were small. After Mati was in school and finished his Army service, his dad asked him to join the business. “I didn’t want to do it” says Mati, “but my father said he is building this bakery for me and I have to continue”. So since 1952, since he was 21, Mati has been in the business. His father continued to work beside him until his latest years, and died in 1964. Five of his brothers and sisters have also passed away.

Today Mati is a grandfather himself, with 2 children and 5 grandchildren. None of them want to continue the business “Nobody wants to work hard today”, Mati says. “Today you can easily make more money in other businesses and fields”. 5 years ago Mati narrowed the activity to 24 hours a week- from Thursday eve to Friday noon. Mati and his family are religious but not Haredi. The neighborhood was also religious and became Haredi only in the last decade or so.

“I don’t earn enough this business to make it worthwhile, but you can’t just close a business of 118 years without thought” he says. He intends to continue “Until the messiah comes!” he adds.

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A photograph of Mati’s father, Rabi...
Jerusalem
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

Mati Landner could not have been more connected to his work place than this: he was born right here in the second floor of his bakery in “Beit-Israel” Haredi neighborhood, Jerusalem, 83 years ago. “The floor above the bakery was our home and this is where my father and sisters were born” Mati says.

The street where the bakery is located is named “Lendner Street” after the grandfather that established the bakery and was from the founders of the veteran Jerusalem neighborhood.

The bakery makes only one product: ״Chala” A traditional Jewish bread, which is baked in an old brick oven. The recipe is the same recipe from Romania “with some improvements I added through the years” Mati adds.

The bakery consists of 3 generations: Mati (83), His father Zalman and his grandfather Moshe-Dov.

The grandfather, Moshe Dov Lendner, came to Israel from Romania in 1880. People told him that “you go to the holy land to die not to live” and he replied that he is going to build the land. He came to Israel on foot and with horses and the way was tough. He started to bake bread for the family and due to the demand opened the bakery in 1896, in the same house where the family was living. When Mati’s father, Zalman, was 18 and finished his studies in Yeshiva, his father asked him to take over the business.

Mati had 8 brothers and sisters, Mati is the second before the youngest among them. They were always in business since they were small. After Mati was in school and finished his Army service, his dad asked him to join the business. “I didn’t want to do it” says Mati, “but my father said he is building this bakery for me and I have to continue”. So since 1952, since he was 21, Mati has been in the business. His father continued to work beside him until his latest years, and died in 1964. Five of his brothers and sisters have also passed away.

Today Mati is a grandfather himself, with 2 children and 5 grandchildren. None of them want to continue the business “Nobody wants to work hard today”, Mati says. “Today you can easily MAKE MORE MONEY in other businesses and fields”. 5 years ago Mati narrowed the activity to 24 hours a week- from Thursday eve to Friday noon. Mati and his family are religious but not Haredi. The neighborhood was also religious and became Haredi only in the last decade or so.

“I don’t earn enough this business to make it worthwhile, but you can’t just close a business of 118 years without thought” he says. He intends to continue “Until the messiah comes!” he adds.

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The outside entrance to Lendner’s b...
Jerusalem
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

The exterior of Mati Landner'sbakery in “Beit-Israel” Haredi neighborhood, Jerusalem.

The street where the bakery is located is named “Lendner Street” after the grandfather that established the bakery and was from the founders of the Jerusalem neighborhood.

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Hani Zalatimo (41) making a “Mutaba...
Jerusalem
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

In a hidden corner of the old city there’s a coolish space with a high ceiling, where only one dish is made: Mutabak (which means “folded” in Arabic). This is a candy made of thin pastry, which is filled with cheese or walnuts. The pastry is baked till its crisp just in the right amount. It is then coated with sugar water and served to your table.‬‬‬

This craft is the work of the Zalatimo family 3 generations. The current proprietor Hani Zalatimo father learned this recopy in Lebanon and fought everyone in the family. Hani (41) and his father (70) are the ones that work here.

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Hani Zalatimo (41) making “Mutabakâ...
Jerusalem
By dafnatal7
03 Sep 2014

In a hidden corner of the old city there’s a coolish space with a high ceiling, where only one dish is made: Mutabak (which means “folded” in Arabic). This is a candy made of thin pastry, which is filled with cheese or walnuts. The pastry is baked till its crisp just in the right amount. It is then coated with sugar water and served to your table.‬‬‬

This craft is the work of the Zalatimo family 3 generations. The current proprietor Hani Zalatimo father learned this recopy in Lebanon and fought everyone in the family. Hani (41) and his father (70) are the ones that work here.