The Streets of Raqqa

Collection with 8 media items created by Transterra Editor

25 Oct 2014 11:15

October 25, 2014
Raqqa, Syria

As the US-led airstrikes against the Islamic State group continue, life goes on in the IS capital of Raqqa. Evidence of IS governance abound on things like billboards, which remind women to cover their faces, and fighters acting as traffic police. Shops go about business as usual, trading in US Dollars and Syrian Pounds, but also facing the challenge of import restrictions.

Raqqa Syria Photos Photo Is Islamic State Isis Isil Islamic Stat... Islamic Stat... Street Billboard Civilians Air Strikes United States

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The streets of raqqa 05
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

Clock Square. The square is often the sight of public executions, including beheadings and crucifixions.

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The streets of raqqa 03
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

People shopping in Tal Abyad Street.

The currency of the shops and markets is either Syrian Pounds or US Dollars. The economy is reportedly neither bad nor good. Merchants trying to import things from outside of Raqqa often face problems of paying high tariffs at regime checkpoints or face the difficulty of a closed border with Turkey, which prevents them from importing goods cheaply.

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The streets of raqqa 01
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
26 Oct 2014

A billboard erected by the media center of Islamic State stands over Al Naeem Square in central Raqqa. The billboard reads: "We will win, despite the international coalition."

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The streets of raqqa 04
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

There are no specific time restrictions on the opening and closing of shops, but there are some restrictions requiring shop owners to close their shops at prayer time and congregate in front of the shops for public prayer. There are no specific working hours, some open at 6 am and some at 7. Some close after the last prayer and some stay till after 10pm.

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The streets of raqqa 06
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

Billboard reminding citizens that the niqab, or veil, is mandatory for women in public. Women still reportedly venture into public, but are required to adhere to the dress codes set out by the Islamic State, including the wearing of clothes that cover the entire body and a veil over the face. While women do not have a curfew, they are not allowed to walk alone at night and are required to have a male relative (brother, father, husband, uncle) with them.

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The streets of raqqa 07
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

February 23 Street.

Employment opportunities are available for certain professions. Public works industries continue employing electrical engineers, mechanical engineers and civil engineers. The consumer protection agency is employing food industry engineers, chemists and veterinarians.

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The streets of raqqa 02
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

An IS fighter takes on the role of traffic police. The Islamic State fighters in charge of governing Raqqa come from a variety of backgrounds. Some fighters are from Raqqa and some are Syrians from other cities. There are also fighters from different countries, including Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and Morocco. The key is that those who interact with the public are Arabs because it is important for citizens to be able to communicate with the authorities in the streets.