Yazidi Refugees Find Shelter in Turkey

Collection with 19 media items created by emrerende

Turkey 05 Sep 2014 00:00

Up to to 16.000 Yazidi refugees have found shelter in Turkey after fleeing the Islamic state onslaught in and around Sinjar in mid-August, 2014. Many have been accommodated in camps set up by Turkey's governmental relief agency. Turkey says it will soon be ready to open three new refugee camps in northern Iraq for Yazidis and Turkmen fleeing violence in Iraq. The government says it has already spent more than 3.5 billion dollars looking after Syrian refugees and is asking the international community to shoulder some of the burden when it comes to refugees from Syria and Iraq.

Yazidi Yazidis Iraqi Islamic State Sinjar Turkey Refugees Refuge

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Yazidis refugees are housed in an area which was originally planned for Christian Iraqis.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

A mother and her baby wait for their turn at the camp's main clinic.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Doctors in the camp say that most of the Yazidis who've arrived at the camp suffer from exhaustion and dehydration.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

The camp provides basic healthcare on site. Those who need further medical care are sent to hospitals in Midyat and Mardin.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

There are just under 3000 Yazidis in the Midyat camp. They started arriving on the 15th of August.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Beriva Kassem, 19, was one of the thousands trapped on Mount Sinjar when it was encircled by IS fighters.

"We left Sinjar because of ISIL. The word of ISIL frightens people, especially Yazidi people. We ran away to protect our women, children and our honor. We kept defending ourselves until the last bullet and there were clashes until 3 o’clock around our village.

We, women fled to the mountains in the area of Der Asi at 8.30, but my father and uncles stayed to defend Sinjar. After that we saw Peshmerga forces were withdrawing, we ran away after the Kurdistan and Iraq [governments] left us alone. We did not run away because of ISIL, but also because of Muslims and Arab people in Sinjar who will occupy our houses.

We walked for a long time until we reached the mountain and, because of the rugged area, thousands of women were suffering from lack of water. Then we moved to safer area.
We were able to defend ourselves, but we [women] were afraid of kidnapping [by IS]. We ran away to protect our honor.

We Yazidi people, and our religion are always targeted. They did not attack us randomly, but they meant to commit genocide and crimes against the Yazidi people. We have no future here. We cannot find stability here under tents. We would like to live in an independent and stable state. We fled also to protect the generation of our children. Maybe we can live here for ten years, but our children cannot. Since the time of our ancestors we have been subjected to more than 70 genocides. No, we cannot go back to Iraq. When we fled, our Arab neighbors invited us to their houses, but we told them that we do not have the same honor. If ISIL had not attacked us, then Arabs and other Kurds would have attacked us.

My family has been divided, some fled to Syria and some stayed in Iraq and we traveled long distances and crossed many mountains until we reached here. Also thousands of families have been divided and even pregnant women were staying alone on mountains."

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Rojbin, age 9, says she wants to go back home. Her parents tell us they can probably never go back to Iraq,

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Ankara says it is closely cooperating with the Kurdish Regional Government in Iraq with regard to setting up new camps near the northern Iraqi towns of Zakho and Dohuk.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Summer temperatures in Turkey's south east can reach 40 degree celcius.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

The estimated number of Yazidi refugees in Turkey is believed to be 16.000.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

The refugees in the camp, both Iraqi-Yazidi and Syrian, are allowed to go into nearby town of Midyat once a week.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

The camp, which is run by Turkey's relief agency has a clinic, schools and an extra curricular activity area.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Many of the children are dealing with dehydration, malnutrition an Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Turkey says it has spent three and a half billion dollars on Syrian refugees since the beginning of the civil war. The daily cost of running a camp is $50.000.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Many of the refugees lost relatives either during the fighting or during the treacherous trek from Iraq to Turkey.

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Yazidis in Turkey
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

The camp in Midyat is now running at full capacity, hence the need for new camps. Turkey says it will build three new refugee camps in Northern Iraq to help cope with the growing number of people in need of shelter.