School for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border)

Collection with 11 media items created by Ferran Quevedo

11 Jul 2014 04:00

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in many cultural activities . They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

Syria Conflict Uprising Civil War Assad Regime Fsa Rural Jihad Rebel Rebels Refugees Gallery Domestic Con... Unicef Unhcr Acnur Médicos Del... Medecins Du ... Gvc Pax Syriana Al Qaeda Hezbollah Sunni Jihadist Syrian Children Destruction Violence Escalation Escalatory P... Complexity Mother Médecins Du ... Education Human Rights Chid Protection Right To Edu... Health Care

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa (Lebanon-Syrian border) Bekaa Valley
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in several activities such as the Christmas party, mother's day, etc.. They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Monthly medical examination at the public school. In general all the children are in good health

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The nursery. There are 70 Syrian children aged from 3 to 6 years divided in two classrooms

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Almost every day the children receive a caloric suplement as biscuits or sandwich and fruit juice during the afternoon

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa is one of three schools that hosts child refugees in the area. The other two schools are in no man's land territory

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

A girl is engaged in the French lesson. They also study English and Arabic as co-official languages ​​of the Lebanese education system

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Two brothers enjoying a class days after arriving to Lebanon

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

lunch break for the sandwich. Many of these children have survived more than two years under the bombings in cities like Homs or Aleppo

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in several activities such as the Christmas party, mother's day, etc.. They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa, more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents, can receive primary education and health care.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

School starts at 3 pm. There are very few teachers in the town and they work in the public school up in the morning.