Documentary Films

Collection with 39 media items created by Transterra Editor

25 Jun 2014 21:00

Collection of the Transterra Media documentaries.

Documentary Documentaries Transterra D... Documentary ...

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Letters to my (Former) Enemy
USA
By benoit.faiveley
11 Oct 2011

Letters to My (Former) Enemy is a documentary film directed by Benoit Faiveley and is currently in production. Contact [email protected] for more information

The characters in the Documentary:
Mary is the mom of a soldier who went to Iraq twice. He is now recovering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Mary is also the woman who inspired the idea for this documentary.

Chanan, Seth and Jeremiah are veterans. Chanan is now hanging out with anti-war people. He is studiying to be a nurse. Seth has a very American hobby: firearms. He also works at the Coffee Strong café, a place he opened near a military base. Jeremiah is a Republican who used to think “Bush was too much of a lefty.” He is studying to be an actor.

These Americans will interact with four Iraqis : Baqir, Ahmed, All’a and Mohy. Baqir is a doctor. He requested political asylum in Sweden when four of his brothers were arrested by the American troops. Ahmed fought in the Mahdi Army while his brother was an interpreter for the American forces. The two “brothers at war” now live in Stockholm. All’a is a Baathist and is nostalgic for the Saddam Hussein Era... even though he’s a Shiite. Mohy has always been against : against the Baath party, against Saddam, against the U.S. He is a former communist. In contrast, Haider keeps supporting the American intervention, even if Baghdad remains in a mess today...

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Transition (Part 2 of 2)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Jan 2010

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. But they seem to have already been persuaded by state TVs' official propaganda pro Bashar Al Assad.
This teaser refers to a full HD 50 min. documentary film.

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Transition (Part 1 of 2)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

PART 2: http://transterramedia.com/media/18536

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 26 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) My name is Wissam and I'm from Syria, I'm a student of Journalism in my final year ...In Moscow The reason why I came to study in a country that lacks freedom of press is that Russia was the only country to give me a visa after I resigned. Oh, I forgot to tell you... I was an officer in the Syrian army

(VO) After the Syrian dictator Hafez al-Assad's death, his son Bashar inherited the power for that, the Constitution was amended, in the world's fastest assembly. The former Constitution demanded that the minimum age for being president should be 40 years of age. They've changed it for 34, the age of Bashar at the time I realized it was about time to write my resignation letter and leave Syria I didn't see my mom for the last 8 years I was afraid of visiting my family in Syria since an old friend from the army told me I was wanted by the Syrian intelligence they've received a report from the embassy in Moscow saying I was against the regime I remembered my father at that point When I was a kid, he used to say: “The walls have ears” By that time, I didn't understand He lived 79 years in fear. When I was in the army, he advised me not to speak about the regime in front of other officers I used to find it funny, him worried about me, and then he told me: “These people are criminals, you didn't see what I saw” Once, he told me about an event so that I could understand his uncommon fear of the regime He told me how the army came and took one person from each house during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in 1980, in Aleppo They took around 100 people, among them children and elderly. It was a very difficult moment for my father, when he saw his childhood friends lined against the wall and get executed These crimes were called Al Mashariqa Massacre, named after the neighborhood where it occurred That's how Hafez al-Assad controlled the country for 3 decades, committing the worse massacres of these times The most famous of them was the Hama Massacre In this city, he killed dozens of thousands of civilians through shelling and artillery in 1982

(VO) In March 2011, the revolution began in Syria I realized then that the blood series started again The dictator inherited from his father not only the country, but also his criminality The difference this time was the will of the people, which had already changed with the generations The dictator used all means of intimidation, such as executions, torture and rape to eliminate the peaceful protests He counts on the support of loyal states, such as Iran and Russia, which provide him with weapons and hinder international resolutions against him But with the continuous bloodshed, people decided to take up arms and defend themselves After the liberation of wide areas in Aleppo, I decided to go back there where I grew up and from where I was away for a long time

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Stolen Brides: Syrian Refugee Women i...
Al Mafraq, Jordan
By Sharron Ward
29 Mar 2013

An exclusive powerful film exposing the sexual exploitation and abuse of Syrian refugee women who are subjected to "pleasure marriages," rape, kidnapping and sexual harassment in Za’atari refugee camp, Jordan.
Duration: 10 minutes
Format: HD 16:9 1080i 1920 x 1080 25 fps, Apple Pro Res HQ 422 PAL
Viewing format: 4:3 low res version

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What a Trip! Cycling from Germany to ...
Germany, Tschech Republik, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore
By Maximilian Semsch
02 May 2008

In 2008 Maximilian Semsch at the age of 24 cycled from Munich to Singapore to find out more about himself and to go on a real adventure, as life must be more than just working. He did the journey all by himself, without the help of a professional camera team. As there was no one to talk to, his camera became his best friend during the trip. His journey started in May 2008 in his hometown Munich. His route took him through Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine into Russia and further on to Kazakhstan. Semsch then did hit rock bottom, as he was refused a visa and couldn't enter China. After days of consideration he did decide to skip China and flew to Thailand. His route through south-east Asia took him from Thailand to Cambodia back into Thailand and via Malaysia he finally reached Singapore, after 211 days and 13.500km on his bike. Semsch recorded everything on his trip. The nice and helpful people he bumped into, drinking vodka in Russia with complete strangers and its aftermath of a hangover the next day but he also tells about his fight against loneliness, heat and extreme headwind. He always does it in a very personal way that gives the audience the feeling of sitting on the back of his bike.

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What a Trip - Around Oz Episode 1
Australia
By Maximilian Semsch
30 Nov 2011

Episode 1 of 9 from the documentary "What a Trip - Around Oz". Maximilian and his team cycled around Australia on E-Bikes. 16.000 km from Sydney to Sydney

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What a Trip - Around Oz Episode 2
Australia
By Maximilian Semsch
01 Oct 2011

Episode 3 of 9 from the documentary "What a Trip - Around Oz". Maximilian and his team cycled around Australia on E-Bikes. 16.000 km from Sydney to Sydney.

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What a Trip - Around Oz Episode 5
Australia
By Maximilian Semsch
01 Oct 2011

Episode 3 of 9 from the documentary "What a Trip - Around Oz". Maximilian and his team cycled around Australia on E-Bikes. 16.000 km from Sydney to Sydney.

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What a Trip - Around Oz Episode 5
Australia
By Maximilian Semsch
24 Sep 2013

Episode 3 of 9 from the documentary "What a Trip - Around Oz". Maximilian and his team cycled around Australia on E-Bikes. 16.000 km from Sydney to Sydney.

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What a Trip - Around Oz Episode 7
Australia
By Maximilian Semsch
01 Oct 2011

Episode 7 of 9 from the documentary "What a Trip - Around Oz". Maximilian and his team cycled around Australia on E-Bikes. 16.000 km from Sydney to Sydney.

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Homemade Oil Refineries On an ISIL Fr...
Msheirfeh, Qamishli, northeast Syria
By Rozh
16 Jun 2014

February 26, 2014
Msheirfeh, Qamishli, Syria

Desperate conditions in northeastern Syria have caused some residents to turn to the dangerous practice of homemade, roadside oil-refining in the hope of earning enough to survive. The village of Msheirfeh is located on a volatile frontline between ISIL and and an alliance of Kurdish and Christian militias. Everyday, self-made oilmen risk their lives to refine raw crude oil, facing warfare and precarious working conditions. The oil refining process produces an uncontrollable amount of poisonous and explosive fumes and the unregulated working conditions have led to accidents with exploding refineries and poison-related amputations. Despite this, many young men see this kind of work as their only chance of earning a living, with schools and universities closed due to the civil war.

Interviews with workers:

First Interview (no name given):
''These are three barrels. We fill up three and we get from it one; gas, fuel and diesel. First we get the fuel. The bigger the fire, the more the product, this is the process.''

Second Interview (no name given):
''First we get the oil here; there’s water with it. We burn it for around 12 hours. First we get the fuel, after 4 or 5 hours. By then the water will be gone. Then we start getting gas and then diesel at the end. The barrel gets us 3000 liras, the gas 7 or 7 and a half, and the diesel 45 or 50. We’re not really making any money from it. We don’t want to do this anymore.”

Q: How long have you been working here and how does this effect on your health?

“It has been a month that I have worked here, there is nothing else to do. We make around 5000 Syrian Pounds ($33) on every barrel, sometimes 4000 ($26). Sometimes we only break even because the oil is expensive. In terms of side effects, your lungs get clogged. Some people are getting sick, major headaches. It is death, slow death. Sometimes there are explosions. Up until now we witnessed 5 explosions. One guy got cut in half. It doesn’t usually happen, but when you re-heat gasoline it often explodes. Someone did it and died. However this one here, if anything goes wrong, is not supposed to explode. We don’t trust the media, they’re bias. You guys might be here to stop us from work, but this is where we get our livelihood.
I don’t want to give my name because you might shut us down and I don’t have another way to make money. Find us another job and we will shut down the refineries. I am 18 years old, I was in college studying law but I stopped."

Q: Why did you come here? What were the circumstances for you leaving college?

"I was in law school, first year. I couldn’t sustain myself, I was begging for bread. So I came here, started working and started to make a little bit of money. Eventually I left college for good. We hope things go back to the way they were so I can move on with my life. Before it was much better, we were able to travel to Damascus and Lebanon. Now we can’t because of the stealing and killing that happens on the road. So I started working in these refineries, as you can see there’s nothing else. No more studies. Even the kids are working here. We hope things get back to normal and oil prices go down, because we’re barely making it.''

General talking:
First person: “Come and see the fuel coming up.”
Second Person: “This is oil with gas.”

Second Interview (no name given):
''There is a bit of water here with the fuel. Sometimes we get better oil that’s water-free, but nowadays we’re mostly getting oil mixed with water from the wells. We can’t tell where the problem is from, if it’s from the wells or the transporter. Oil prices are soaring, we get the oil for 3200 Syrian Pounds ($21) and pay an extra 500 ($3.30) to the guy. So in all you pay 3700 Syrian Pounds ($24), sometimes you break even, sometimes you lose 1000 ($6.6) or 1500 Syrian Pounds ($10).''

Third Interview - Maher Hussein:
“I scratched my hand on metal scrap from the barrels and I got oil on it. Now it’s been numb for a few weeks. Someone else got oil in his wounds so he went to a clinic and they cut off his hand. I’ve been working here for two months. I stopped working around a month ago, because of my hand."

Q: Are you scared they might cut off your hand as well?

“Of course I am afraid. I’ve been going to the doctor and getting some medicine but my hand’s not getting any better.”

Q: What did you do before working in the fields?

“I used to study and now I even stopped working here because of my hand and without oil there is no work.”

Fourth Interview – Ahmad Hamdosh:
“Before I was a schoolteacher, now I stopped school and I’m working here in the fields. We’re not sleeping at night because of the coughing. We were comfortable and happy working at the school. Now we work in oil and it’s full of sicknesses. Some guy got cancer working here. God knows what’s going to happen to my hand. There’s one guy they cut off three of his fingers because of a small scratch that he got oil on it. If they hadn’t cut them off, his whole hand would’ve been infected and they would have had cut it all off. Before you used to get compensation, now no one gives you anything and you can’t even work.

Most importantly, from the bottom of my heart I wish for security to come back. Security is the most important thing, security and affordable prices. I wish even it’d be half of what it was before. The barrels are getting here for 3500 Syrian Pounds ($23), which is almost nothing, and I’m still making sure it’s the exact amount on the scale. Now they’re charging us on the milliliter, before people used to make millions in the oil business.

My name is Ahmad and I’m 22 years old. You open this here and put in the oil, and then you turn on the fire under it. The smoke fills the upper half of the barrel, and then it goes into the tube and the pipe goes through the water and you get the fuel on the other side. After the fuel you get the gas, after the gas you get the diesel. At the end we open it here to take out the waste. We call it ‘zero’ and we keep it to fuel the fire for the barrels. A teapot, we’re heating water for tea here. We’re already getting all the smoke in our lungs; it is not going to make a difference if we boil the tea here.”

Fifth interview – Mehdi Darwish:
“I’m a business graduate. There’s nothing else to do around here. There’s no work in Hassake other then this. Working in oil is all right but the prices per barrel are getting higher and higher and the oil is coming mixed with water. We’re working hard through sweat and blood and we’re exhausting ourselves. We put in place a new oil refinery to enhance the production. The smoke goes through the tube, through the water, to cool it down and we get fuel, diesel and gas. There has to be two people working, one on the burner and the other one has to fill the tank. Out of three oil barrels we get one barrel of diesel and around 150(?) fuel and gas.”

Interview 6 – Awad Al Jasim:
“I used to work as a mechanic. I am 18 years old. I came here to work in the burners and I also have heart problems. Thank you!”

Interview 7 – Mohamed Monther:
“They [ISIL] throw the oil on the ground and take the cars and say that it is theirs now. They take the car sell it, or use it in car-bomb operations. We have nothing here we are barely getting by. They come from Pakistan and Kyrgyzstan looking for Nymphs (female sex jihadists) here. We don’t have any Nymphs here. Look at the state the Syrian people are in. This is no way to live.”

Interview 8 – No Name Given:
“Once they [ISIL] say ‘Allah Akbar’, they cut the person's head off. Is that halal? Are we chickens?”

Shot List: (Description of various shots in the video)

The rest of shots are wide shots of the refineries spread all over the main road and shots of the interviewees working, walking and talking with each other while on the makeshift refineries. The shots show the daily routine of life at the refineries.

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Homemade Oil Refinery in Qamishli, Ms...
Qameshli, Syria
By Rozh
09 Apr 2014

DOPE SHEET

Story Title: Making a Living at Syria’s Untold Frontline

Date: 26 February

Location: Msheirfeh, Qamishli, northeast Syria.

Storyline: Msheirfeh was a small tranquil agricultural village prior to the civil war and now trapped in the front line, it has become home for a highly dangerous homemade oil refining business, for which its’ locals often risk it all to make a small income and survive through the hard times.

Interviewees with workers:

First Interview – No Name Given:
''These are three barrels, we fill up three and we get from it one; gas, fuel and diesel. First we get the fuel. The bigger the fire, the more the product, this is the process.''   Second Interview – No Name Given:
''First we get the oil here, there’s water with it. We burn it for around 12 hours. First we get the fuel, after 4 or 5 hours. By then the water will be gone. Then we start getting gas and then diesel, at the end. The barrel gets us 3000 liras, the gas 7 or 7 and a half, and the diesel 45 or 50. We’re not really making any money from it. We don’t want to do this anymore.   Q: How long have you been working here and how does this effect on your health?
  It has been a month I’m working here, there is nothing else to do. We make around 5000 liras on every barrel, sometimes 4000; sometimes we only break even because the oil is expensive.
In terms of side effects, your lungs get clogged. Some people are getting sick, major headaches. It is death, slow death. Sometimes there are explosions. Until now we witnessed 5 explosions. One guy got cut in half. It doesn’t usually happen but when you re-cook gasoline it often explodes. Someone did it and died. Though this one here, if anything goes wrong it’s not supposed to explode.
We don’t trust the media, they’re bias. You guys might be here to stop us from work but this is where we get our livelihood.
I don’t want to give my name because you might shut us down and I don’t have another way to make money. Find us another job and we shut down the refineries.
I’m 18 years old, I was in college studying law but I stopped.
  Q: Why did you come here? What were the circumstances for you leaving college?
  I was in law school, first year, I couldn’t sustain myself, I was begging for bread. So I came here, started working and started to make a little bit of money, and finally I left college for good. We hope things go back to the way they were so I can move on with my life. Before it was much better, we were able to travel to Damascus and Lebanon. Now we can’t because of the stealing and killing that happens on the road. So I started working in these refineries, as you can see there’s nothing else. No more studies. Even the kids are working here. We hope things get back to normal and oil prices go down, because we’re barely making it.''
  General talking:
First person: Come and see the fuel coming up.
Second Person: This is oil with gas.
  Second Interview – No Name Given:
''There is a bit of water here with the fuel. Sometimes we get better oil, water free but nowadays we’re getting oil mixed water from the wells. We can’t tell where the problem is from, if it’s from the wells or the transporter. Oil prices are soaring, we get the oil for 3200 liras and pay an extra 500 to the guy. So in all you pay 3700 liras, sometimes you break even, sometimes you lose a 1000 or a 1500 liras.''
  Third Interview - Maher Hussein:
“I scratched my hand on metal scrap from the barrels and I got oil on it. Now it’s been numb for a few weeks. Someone else got oil in his wounds he went to a clinic and they cut off his hand. I’ve been working here for two months. I stopped working a month or so ago because of my hand.
  Q: Are you scared they would cut off your hand as well?
  Of course I am afraid. I’ve been going to the doctor and getting some medicine but my hand’s not getting any better.
  Q: What did you do before working in the fields?
  I used to study and now I even stopped working here because of my hand and without oil there is no work.”
  Fourth Interview – Ahmad Hamdosh:
“Before I was a schoolteacher, now I stopped school and I’m working here in the fields. We’re not sleeping at night because of the coughing. We were comfortable and happy working at the school. Now we work in oil and it’s full of sicknesses. Some guy got cancer working here. God knows what’s going to happen to my hand. There’s one guy they cut off three of his fingers because of a small scratch that he got oil on it. If they hadn’t cut them his whole hand would’ve been infected and they would’ve cut it all off. Before you used to get compensation, now no one gives you anything and you can’t even work.
Most importantly, from the bottom of my heart I wish for security to come back. Security is the most important thing, security and affordable prices. I wish even it’d be half of what it was before. The barrels are getting here for 3500 liras, which is almost nothing, and I’m still making sure it’s the exact amount on the scale. Now they’re charging us on a milliliter, before people used to make millions in the oil business.
My name is Ahmad and I’m 22 years old.
You open this here and put in the oil, and then you turn on the fire under it. The smoke fills the upper half of the barrel, and then it goes into the tube and the pipe goes through the water and you get the fuel on the other side. After the fuel you get the gas, after the gas you get the diesel. At the end we open it here to take out the remains. We call it zero, we keep them to fuel the fire for the barrels.
A teapot, we’re heating water for tea here. We’re already getting all the smoke in our lungs; it is not going to make a difference if we boil the tea here.”
  Fifth interview – Mehdi Darwish:
“I’m a business graduate. There’s nothing else to do around here. There’s no work in Hassake other then this.  Working in oil is all right but the prices per barrel are getting higher and higher and the oil is coming mixed with water. We’re working hard through sweat and blood and we’re exhausting ourselves. We put in place a new oil refinery to enhance the production. The smoke goes through the tube, through the water, to cool it down and we get fuel, diesel and gas. There has to be two people working, one on the burner and the other one has to fill the tank. Out of three oil barrels we get one barrel of diesel and around 150(?) fuel and gas.”   Interview 6 – Awad Al Jasim:
“I used to work as a mechanic. I am 18 years old. I came here to work in the burners I also have heart problems. Thank you!”

Interview 7 – Mohamed Monther:
“They throw the oil on the ground and take the cars and say it is there's now. They take the car sell it, or use it in car bomb operations. We have nothing here we are barely getting by. They come from Pakistan and Kirgizstan looking for Nymphs (women Jihadist receive in heaven) here. We don’t have any Nymphs here. Look at the state the Syrian people are in. This is no way to live.”

Interview 8 – No Name Given:
“Once they say Allah Akbar they cut the person's head off. Is that halal? Are we chicken?”

Shot List: (Description of various shots in the video)

The rest of shots are wide shots of the refineries spread all over the main road and shots of the interviewees working, walking and talking with each other while on the makeshift refineries. The shots showsa the daily routine of life at the refineries.

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Uprising Preview
Cairo, Egypt
By f.stanton
16 Apr 2012

In January 2011, millions of Egyptians took to the streets in a spontaneous eruption against thirty years of oppression under the regime of Hosni Mubarak. Communicating via Facebook and Twitter, the largely peaceful protesters braved tear gas, beatings, and live bullets in the hope of facing down security forces and overthrowing the government. Over eight hundred lost their lives, and several thousand were arrested and tortured by security forces.
“Uprising” tells the story of the Egyptian revolution from the perspective of those who participated, their struggle for freedom against tremendous odds, their sacrifice, and the courage and ingenuity that allowed them to succeed. Using footage of the revolution as well as interviews with key organizers and participants, “Uprising” provides a behind-the scenes view of one of the most dramatic events of our generation. Many of those profiled were arrested, some were tortured, several were shot. All of them describe it as the most meaningful and rewarding event of their lives. The film explores the frustrations that had built for decades, the role of social media in unleashing the revolution, the youth and courage that changed a nation, and the implications for the future. Their success in forcing the downfall of the regime, one of the most significant foreign policy developments since the fall of the Berlin Wall, has changed the face of the Middle East and provided hope for millions of oppressed people across the world. The Egyptian revolution was unique, in its use of technology, in its youth, and in its scale, and it happened at the heart of a region that is especially important and fragile. Above all, it is a story of profound hope, of courage rewarded, of a people who in a spontaneous, peaceful eruption beat back a police state and threw off the shackles of decades of degradation and oppression.

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Big Questions - Emerging Markets
By Patricia Werhane
24 Apr 2014

Can one person make a difference? Follow two married American entrepreneurs who are doing just that in Ghana, with wells, pineapples, and a school for the deaf, and look at how outsiders can positively affect change in a foreign country.

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'Les eaux cachées' (Hidden Waters) --...
Fez, Morocco
By Joe Lukawski
31 Mar 2012

Trailer (HD) for 'Les eaux cachées' (Hidden Waters), a documentary film about the past, present and future of water in Fez, Morocco.

Directed and Produced by : Joe Lukawski

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Delhi's Urban Crisis -- Growing Waste...
Delhi, India
By bajpairavi
05 Jul 2012

Indian capital Delhi and its satellite towns have nearly 23 million residents, making it the world’s second most populous metropolitan region. Its population is growing at a phenomenal pace, demanding a commensurate increase in infrastructure support to keep the city livable. But the rate of development is lagging behind.

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"We Resist" _ TRAILER
Buenos Aires, Argentina
By @LatAmSight
21 Apr 2012

ARGENTINA
2011
52min
Directors: Philippe Bernard § Nicolas Mu
Trailer Editor DF: Mariano Melega
Creative Producer: Rebecca Martin

Brief synopsis

Hip-hop: whatever the language, whatever the country, these two words conjure up negative images. Many people see hip-hop only as a musical genre and consider it indelibly linked to violence, drugs and delinquency. Yet the overriding aim of hip-hop as a culture is to unite, educate and spread peace. It does this through four distinct forms of expression: words (rap), music, dance and graffiti. Our documentary examines the rise of hip-hop in a country whose recurrent economic and social crises have left it, too, on the margins. The result is a unique look behind the clichés of Argentina, known abroad largely for football, tango and Evita. We see Buenos Aires, and hip-hop, with new eyes.
Argentina’s turbulent contemporary history, including periods of openness and others of isolation from the outside world, have forced hip-hop musicians and artists to merge influences from abroad with elements of their own national culture. Hip-hop still occupies a niche in Argentina, but it is extremely dynamic and has forged its own identity, rather than simply copying its American or French cousins.
Graffiti artists from France, Brazil or the United States who were unable to give free rein to their artistic expression because of police repression at home, found incredible freedom and acres of white walls in Argentina. They taught their techniques to Argentine graffiti artists who imbued them with their own particular hallmarks: Jaz is one of the precursors of the “grafiteado” style, a mix between graffiti and the home-grown “fileteado” whose flourishes and curlicues are an Argentine tradition, still adorning city buses and signs today. The rapper Mustafa Yoda drew his influence from “payadores” or gaucho minstrels famous for their improvisation, for his freestyle battles. Argentina’s convulsed political, social and economic history continues to inspire the combative lyrics of groups such as Bas Crew or Actitud María Marta. El Guapo appears as the symbol of this successful quest for identity : he unites the past and the future, tango, folk, rock and hip-hop. With his inimitable style, this great collector of tango records plunges us into the Argentina of Carlos Gardel and Astor Piazzola.
This documentary peels back the skin of Argentina. The creativity, dedication and determination of these hip-hop artists are a reflection of a country which continues to advance, despite its political, social and economic difficulties.

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Dérives
Montreal, Canada
By SpiralDragon
31 Oct 2012

Ensglish follows

Réalisé de façon indépendante sans aucune contribution financière, le film Dérives est le résultat de plus de trente heures d'entretiens réalisés avec des citoyennes et des citoyens témoins et victimes d'abus policiers.

Le film est partagé gratuitement depuis le 13 février dernier sur Internet à partir du site web du collectif (www.99media.org), avec l'objectif de nourrir le débat public sur la question de l'exercice de la répression et ses conséquences sociales. Une répression qui fut banalisée - voire encouragée - à la fois par les sphères politiques et médiatiques québécoises.

En un mois, le total des visionnements pour Dérives a atteint la somme de 50 000. Le film a également été diffusé plusieurs fois devant public et sera projeté le samedi 16 mars 2013 dans le cadre du festival Hors Cadre. Il s’agit d’un succès qui dépasse toute espérance pour un film qui n'a fait l'objet d'aucune mention par les médias traditionnels et qui prouve que les créateurs des médias émergents pourront désormais s'affranchir de la nécessité d'une attention médiatique.

--------English--------

Produced independently without any financial aid, Dérives is the result of more than thirty hours of interview with citizen witnesses, and victims, of police brutality.

The film has been available online for free since February 13th on the collective's website (www.99media.org), with the goal of contributing to the public debate on the issue of repression and its social consequences... repression that has been banalised, even encouraged, by Quebec's political and media spheres.

A month after its release, Dérives has been seen more than 50 000 times. The film has also been screened publicly a number of times and will be featured on Saturday, March 16th 2013 at the Hors Cadre festival. This is an unprecedented success for a Quebec documentary without any traditional media mention, proving the emerging media scene can now overcome the need of mainstream media attention.

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Stateless Part 2
Kampala, Geneva, London, Chicago
By DocuProf
03 Jan 2013

Since the 1994 Genocide, Rwandan refugees from that conflict- and from subsequent events- have created a population of over 150,000 (some say 250,00) living around the world.
In June of 2013, most of these refugees will lose their refugee status and be forced back to Rwanda by the UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees) and host countries.
The refugees fear repatriation to a country they see as oppressive, dictatorial and discriminatory.

This film explores why it is NOT a proper time to invoke this return by the UN and host countries.

It has interviews with major figures in refugee studies, Paul Rusesabagina (The REAL "Hotel Rwanda" person), Theogene Rudesingwa (former Ambassador to the US from Rwanda) who has been exiled as well as UN officials, Human Rights activists and refugees themselves.
Much of the film was actually shot by the refugees.
46 min long for a broadcast hour

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Stateless Part 1
Kampala, Chicago, London, Geneva
By DocuProf
01 Jan 2013

Part 2 http://transterramedia.com/media/16897

PART 1
Since the 1994 Genocide, Rwandan refugees from that conflict- and from subsequent events- have created a population of over 150,000 (some say 250,00) living around the world.
In June of 2013, most of these refugees will lose their refugee status and be forced back to Rwanda by the UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees) and host countries.
The refugees fear repatriation to a country they see as oppressive, dictatorial and discriminatory.

This film explores why it is NOT a proper time to invoke this return by the UN and host countries.

It has interviews with major figures in refugee studies, Paul Rusesabagina (The REAL "Hotel Rwanda" person), Theogene Rudesingwa (former Ambassador to the US from Rwanda) who has been exiled as well as UN officials, Human Rights activists and refugees themselves.
Much of the film was actually shot by the refugees.
46 min long for a broadcast hour

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Rwanda Reconciliation
Rwanda
By carloscastro
01 Jul 2012

SYNOPSIS
Nearly 20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, reconciliation between ex-prisoners and survivors has been a blessing and a curse, bringing villages together in forgiveness, while other victims live next-door to the very people who've committed atrocities that haven't been brought to justice.

"The first day we ex-prisoners and survivors sat face to face, we thought that the survivors would revenge. But they were also worried. They thought we had returned to commit another genocide," said a man who was imprisoned for eight years for the crimes he committed in 1994.

Reconciliation was the only way to survive and a political priority for the government that arose after the genocide and it is still in power. The justice of the Gacaca Courts — which were formed to convict people who committed war crimes — the government and the press all pushed on that direction of reconciliation. But at the same time, it has been imposed, a one-way process that created cracks. The suffering and the wounds of so many atrocities are still present today.

This documentary is part of a series called the ‘After Peace' project, which seeks to analyze and explain how four countries (Rwanda, Lebanon, Guatemala and Bosnia-Herzegovina) have dealt an armed conflict in their country in the last quarter of the 20th century.

Documentary collection can be viewed here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1254

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Guatemala: Rescuing the memory
Guatemala
By carloscastro
30 Jul 2012

After its war, Guatemala had two Truth Commissions, one driven by the UN and the other by the Church. Both reports agree that the State is responsible for the majority of crimes committed during the conflict. They further point out that the State committed acts of genocide against the Mayan population. There were over 600 massacres like the one occurred on the community of Plan de Sánchez, that each year commemorates the crime. Even today, after 16 years, Guatemala fights a permanent battle both against oblivion and for justice. Institutions such as the Guatemalan National Police Historical Archive, the Centre for Human Rights Legal Action or the Forensic Anthropology Foundation work -without the support of the State-, to repair victims still seeking a clue, those responsible for the disappearance of a family member or justice.

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Bosnia: Divided Peace
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By carloscastro
01 Jun 2011

The long way towards peace starts just after the signature of the peace agreements, when the complex and difficult process of building peace, memory, truth, reconciliation and justice for all the victims begins. The documentaries of the ‘After Peace' project seek to analyze and explain different ways taken by various countries who suffered an armed conflict in the last quarter of the 20th century. Researchers, activists for peace and reconciliation, victims, lawyers and educators expose what has been done and what has been ignored in their countries and talk about their experiences.
The Dayton Peace Accords divided Bosnia Herzegovina into two entities. The deal left a "very complicated system, as it was created in order to protect the fragile ethnic balance at all levels," says Srecko Latal, an analyst of the International Crisis Group. Moreover, the consequences of Dayton are still tangible in society. The education system segregates students by their ethnic, thousands of people live in camps while others search for their missing relatives. Nowadays, forgiveness is still far but part of civil society believes in reconciliation and work to achieve it and for the reparation of the victims.

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LEBANON: Pact of Silence
Lebanon
By carloscastro
01 Jun 2011

SYNOPSIS:
Those who fought the war imposed silence. They could do so because they still have power. The political elite in Lebanon neither assumed their guilt in a conflict that pitted the country's communities nor held external actors accountable for their participation. Their objective has been to build a new country over the ruins of the old one in order to forget the war. The words justice, truth and reconciliation are not on the political agenda, but there are voices still crying courageous. "I can not reconcile with the criminal if I do not know the truth. Then I will decide whether to forgive or not", says Wadada Halwani, president of the Committee of Families of the Kidnapped and Missing persons in Lebanon.

The long way towards peace starts just after the signature of the peace agreements, when the complex and difficult process of building peace, memory, truth, reconciliation and justice for all the victims begins. The documentaries of the ‘After Peace' project seek to analyze and explain different paths taken by various countries who suffered an armed conflict in the last quarter of the 20th century. Researchers, activists for peace and reconciliation, victims, lawyers and educators expose what has been done and what has been ignored in their countries and talk about their experiences.

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Saliendo Adelante (Moving Forward)
Bogota, Colombia
By Ben Cheetham
26 Aug 2012

Walking through Bogotá it would be hard to ignore the overwhelming presence of those who call its streets home. Thousands of young people make up this sub-group of society, a legacy of decades of political instability. This Film takes place in one of 26 houses set up by ‘the Institution for the Protection of Childhood and Adolescence’ (IDIPRON) located in the centre of Bogotá.

‘Saliendo Adelante’ explores the life of José who, now in his early 20’s, has lived on the streets since the age of 6. José is now attempting to change his life’s trajectory by talking part in the programme of social rehabilitation offered by the institution. Through the film we are also introduced to the work of Orlando, a teacher at the institution, and his efforts to offer those like José other ways of visualizing the world around them.

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From Runes to Ruins - Anglo Saxon Pag...
United Kingdom
By Tom Rowsell
20 Apr 2014

FULL DOCUMENTARY VIEWABLE ON REQUEST

From Runes to Ruins is the first ever documentary film about Anglo-Saxon paganism. Independently produced and funded, it is unique in its emotive and artistic approach to religious history.

All over Britain there are people whose lives are influenced by the largely forgotten culture of the Anglo-Saxon barbarians who founded England. There are landmarks, place names and aspects of our language which are remnants of Anglo-Saxon paganism. It is from Woden, the god of war, that we take the name for the third day of the week, Wednesday (Woden’s day). There are many places around England named after Woden, like the ancient earthwork of Wansdyke which was probably a cult-centre of the god. In this film, Tom Rowsell, an expert in the paganism of early medieval England, travels around the country looking at places like Wansdyke and talking to people whose lives are influenced by the Anglo-Saxons and their pagan religion. The film features all kinds of peculiar characters; like neo-pagans worshipping Thor in Oxfordshire, the leader of the London Longsword Academy and historical re-enactors who like nothing more than to get dressed up in armour and swing axes at each other.

From Runes to Ruins combines amusing and characterful interviews with informative history all presented with beautiful cinematography and an original and haunting synth soundtrack.

Despite the significance of Anglo-Saxon paganism to the history of Britain, no one has ever made a documentary exclusively on this subject. In this film, Thomas Rowsell reveals a forgotten aspect of English history that many are oblivious to, by uncovering paganism in runes and ruins

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Big Questions - Poverty is a System
Tanzania
By Patricia Werhane
24 Apr 2014

Go to Tanzania to see how health care and education are being used to deal with major illnesses in rural communities. We discuss the importance of how businesses and NGOs do work while looking at a leper colony and a project using communication to prevent malaria. Does a pharmaceutical company have a greater responsibility to people than other businesses?

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Big Questions - The Children of Syria
Jordan
By Patricia Werhane
24 Apr 2014

We talk with Syrian refugees currently seeking refuge in Jordan, and hear their stories and challenges. UN aid workers and Jordanians talk with us about the the challenges of dealing with refugees, and how children are, and will continue to be, heavily affected.

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Big Questions - Cottage Industries
Bangladesh
By Patricia Werhane
28 Feb 2014

After microlending, Cottage Industries are used to help bring people out of poverty by creating the means for the poor to sustain themselves. Examine how this works while visiting a variety of these small businesses, including a fishery operation bringing money, food, health, and education to its community.

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Big Questions - Microlending
Bangladesh
By Patricia Werhane
22 Jan 2014

We look at the strengths and weaknesses of microlending both as an idea and a tool for poverty alleviation, talking with experts in the field (including Nobel peace prize winner Muhammad Yunus), and showing how it’s being combined with other poverty alleviation efforts in Bangladesh to create a self-sustaining environment for a poor, rural community.

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Kurdish Female Fighters: A Day in Syr...
Terbespi, Syria
By Rozh
05 May 2014

March 18, 2014

Tirbespi, Northeast Syria.

Storyline: Female fighters of the pro-Kurdish Yekineyen Parastina Jin (Women Protection Units) (YPJ) tell their stories, their experiences, why they joined and what they fight for in this women-only militia amid the civil war in Syria.

Interviewees:

  1. Janda Chya, prefers to be called only as "Janda"
    Captain, YPJ Sehid Warsin Brigade

2.Dicle Jutiar, prefers to be named only as "Dicle"
Captain, YPJ Sehid Warsin Brigade

  1. Shilan Muslim, "Shilan"
    Combatant, YPJ Sehid Warsin Brigade

  2. Sozda Muhammad, "Sozda"
    Combatant, YPJ Sehid Warsin Brigade

  3. Zilan Salih, "Zilan"
    Teacher

6.Desine Xelef, "Desine"
Combatant, YPJ Sehid Warsin Brigade

  1. Manifa Salih
    Mother of Janda Chya

Shot List

  • Cutaways of AK47 being cleaned and getting loaded.

  • Zoom out establishing the location.

  • Static shots of the company fighters coming to morning attention

  • Mid and close-up shots of the interviewees outside in the open and inside a room of the camp.

  • Cutaway shots of the fighters walking around and guarding their camp as well as checkpoints.

  • Cutaway of a fighter reading a book. Others clean rifles or walk to their posts.

-Wide shots of one of the building of the camp, in front of which the fighters receive weekly food.

  • Wide, mid, close-up shots as well as zoom in and out of the fighters' daily routine: talking, joking, singing, dancing, language teaching and having launch. The shots include inside building and outside in the open at the camp.

  • Close ups, mid and wide shots of interviewees cleaning theirs rifles at the time they talk of their experiences when they first joined, why they joined and what their families think of them as women fighters. Also highlighting their fears and how they overcame them.

  • Cutaway checkpoint shots.

  • Shots inside a car taking an interviewee to visit her family and talks about how she cannot often visit because of continues attacks against them.

  • Wide and mid shots following talents while being interviewed at the camp.

  • Wide and mid shots following two talents entering a family village home.

  • Wide, mid and close ups of the talents and family members inside and outside the village home as well as through the village when they goodbye apart.

  • Short shots of from inside the car showing a drive through Tirbespi's main road while en route to the village house.

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Big Questions - Fresh Start
Joseph, Michigan, USA
By Patricia Werhane
01 Apr 2014

‘Fresh Start’ is a corrections program in Berrien County jail in the US state of Michigan that aims to break the cycle of offending that its enrollees, and many current and former inmates, face. See how the program teaches the inmates how to face their actions, as we talk to ‘Fresh Start’s participants and founder about the goals and effects of the program.

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Big Questions - Millennium Village Pr...
Kumasi, Ghana
By Patricia Werhane
16 May 2014

Go inside a Millennium Village, a UN effort developed by Jeffrey Sachs to intervene in a number of areas of need (agriculture, health, education, infrastructure) in one concentrated effort, and see their Telemedicine operation, which brings medical assistance to people for whom assistance is too far away to access or not available.

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Big Questions - Indigenous Rights
Minnesota, USA
By Patricia Werhane
28 Jan 2014

We look at how centuries-old agreements are still heavily influential today, in both a legal battle in Minnesota between the state government and the Ojibwe tribe and the lives of Ojibwe tribal members living on the White Earth reservation.

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Big Questions - The Faces of Wage Theft
Chicago, Illinois, USA
By Patricia Werhane
28 Jan 2014

Join us as we examine a major issue facing persons from all walks of life that is often hidden from sight. We talk to wage theft victims about how it affects them, their families and their communities. We discuss the ethics of employers not paying workers properly or at all, and what can and should be done.

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Big Questions - Homeless No More
Chicago, Illinois, USA
By Patricia Werhane
02 May 2014

James, an American Vietnam War veteran/former gang member/alcoholic with 20+ years sober, participates in a variety of welfare programs, and spends his days helping and giving back to those in need. See welfare and philanthropy through his eyes, as we discuss their effects on both the people who support these systems and who they support.

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Big Questions - Benefit Corporations
Oakland, California, USA
By Patricia Werhane
22 Feb 2014

Visit an Oakland, California-based Benefit Corporation which gives its profits back to charities chosen by its customers. Meet the charities and Benefit Corporations it works with, and see how for-profit philanthropy is improving lives in the community.

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Big Questions - Food Deserts
Chicago, Illinois, USA
By Patricia Werhane
31 Mar 2014

Follow us to a Chicago food desert to shop for a family of four, and talk with a doctor who grew up in the neighborhood about what shopping was like for her family growing up. We also visit with food assistance programs (including the Chicago Food Depository) to see how they affect their communities, and what challenges they face.