Bosnian Landmine Survivors

Collection with 21 media items created by Transterra Editor

06 Jan 2014 16:00

Almost two decades after the war in Bosnia & Herzegovina ended with the signing of the Dayton Peace Agreement, the country remains threatened by more than 120,000 landmines, a dark legacy of the war, buried in the ground along former frontlines. As urban areas are meanwhile largely demined, people living in the remote landside of Bosnia are permanently threatened by the silent hazard near their homes.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 6
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Nearly 1.250 square kilometers of Bosnia – about 2,5 % of its total land mass – are still profoundly mined. Big vegetation is one of the biggest problems in the act of demining along with the fact that a lot of the soil is contaminated with metal from bullets, cartridge, fragments, shrapnel, barbwire and other metal garbage. Due to safety reasons a deminer has to check every signal, even the smallest, until a depth of 20cm. This makes the job of clearing a mined area slower and more dangerous.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 7
Doboj, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Goranović (40), far right, stepped on a landmine while serving in the army of Republika Srpske in 1992 and suffered a below-knee amputation of his right leg. After the end of the war Goran didn’t receive any financial or psychological support. He is living with his family in a very remote area in Doboj region, Republika Srpska. In 2002 Zoran Panic (far left), who is working for the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) in Doboj, learned about his case and the initiative started to support Goran with a cultivator for agricultural use as well as weekly visits. Here the two are accompanied by Ramiz Bećirović from LSI Tuzla.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 8
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Warning sign at the entrance of a wood land near Olovo.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 9
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ibrahim Bijelic (38) has been badly injured during a landmine incident in late 2012 when the family was collecting firewood in the nearby forest. His 6-year old son Tarik has been fatally wounded in the same incident and died in the arms of his father. Like for many other villagers in such a remote area the only possible way for the Bijelic family to make a living is by seling collected firewood from the forests. Ibrahim and his family have not been supported by the government since the incident. They are in need of financial and psychological support. The Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) supports the family with regular visits and provided an agricultural cultivator so that Ibrahim is able to earn some money.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 11
Doboj region, bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Since she was a little girl collecting firewood has always been essential to Razija Aljić (54). This made her make a living and to weather long and cold winters in remote Bosnian landside.

After the war, following the return to their pre-war house in the village of Lukavica Rijeka in Doboj municipality, the circumstance got very wicked and the family’s tragedy took its course:

In 1996 Razija has lost her 19-year old son Nedzad in a landmine incident near their house. Only two years later her husband got killed in another explosion. In summer 2011 Razija’s second son Yusuf and his brother-in-law were fatally wounded by a landmine explosion and died in the forests. Ruzmir (19) is Razija’s only remaining son.

During the interview he points out that in order to support a living for his family he will soon go back to the forests.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 12
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Stanusic from Bosnia & Herzegovina Mine Action Center (BHMAC) is clearing an area near Visoko. Members of the mine squad work alone and scan about five square meters with a metal detector every 30 minutes. Since 1995 nearly 50 mine clearance personnel have been killed, 115 have been seriously wounded.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 13
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Deminers from BH MAC have successfully cleared a small area near Visoko and withdrawn the security tapes. (from left to right: BH MAC inspector Sinisa, team leader Marko, deminer Nebojsa, operative officer Savo)

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 14
Zivinice, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ajka Ibrahimovic didn’t receive any governmental support since the tragic events in 1995. Back ten,she and her 5-year old son Aldin were seriously wounded due to the explosion of unexploded ordnance (UXO). The incident killed two women and seven children including Ajkas nephew. Until today Ajka has shrapnel pieces inside her body and lungs. Removing them in an operation would be too dangerous.

LSI has supported her with the allocation of a greenhouse. Ajka is now successfully growing vegetables and selling them to neighbors in her hometown Zivinice.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 15
Zivinice, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Aldin Ibrahimovic is studying at the faculty of mining in Tuzla and will soon graduate. Untill today, Aldin has shrapnel pieces inside his body. As often as he can he is supporting his mother in her greenhouse.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 16
Zivinice, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ajka Ibrahimovic is proudly showing the harvest of her greenhouse. Since the LSI supported her with the allocation of a greenhouse in 2011 she is successfully earning money out of growing vegetables.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 17
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ibrahim Bijelic (38) showing his agricultural cultivator.Itwhich has been provided by the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) with financial support of UNDP and Norwegian Aid.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 18
Doboj region, bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Goranović (40) stepped on a landmine while serving in the army of Republika Srpske in 1992 which made him suffer from a below-knee amputation of his right leg. He is living with his family in a very remote area in Doboj region, Republika Srpska. In 2002 the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) in Doboj knew about his case and started to support Goran with a cultivator for agricultural use.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 19
Doboj region, bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Goranović (40) showing his agricultural cultivator. It has been provided by the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI) with financial support of UNDP and Norwegian Aid.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 20
Doboj region, bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Jozo Karinovic (42) stepped on a landmine while serving in the army in Brezove Dane in 1992 which made him suffer from a below-knee amputation of his left leg. With financial support of the LSI he started to do grow fruits for living.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 21
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

After a day of demining an area near Visoko BH MAC officials and deminers meet for a debriefing. Team leader Borislav, second from right, explains the situation.

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Bosinian Landmine Survivors 22
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

BH MAC team leader Borislav is holding a map of the mined area in front of him. Nearly 1.250 square kilometers of Bosnia – about 2,5 % of its total land mass – are still profoundly mined.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 1
Sarajevo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

War damages in Bosnia & Herzegovina’s capital Sarajevo have mostly been disappeared during the past decade. On August 25th, 1992, due to heavy shelling of the city, the Vijećnica, Sarajevo’s National Library and nearly all of its books burst up in flames. In 2013 the outside restoration has been completed and re-opening is scheduled for 2014.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 2
Visoko, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Goran Stanusic from Bosnia & Herzegovina Mine Action Center (BHMAC) is clearing in an area near Visoko. Members of the mine squad work alone and scan about five square meters with a metal detector every 30 minutes. Since 1995 nearly 50 mine clearance personnel have been killed, 115 have been seriously wounded

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 3
Sarajevo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Since the outbreak of Bosnia’s three-year war in 1992 nearly 10.000 people have either been killed or badly injured in landmine incidents all over the country.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 4
Olovo, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Adila Bijelic (62) and her family have been seriously affected by Bosnia’s landmine situation in multiple tragedies. Her husband Fehim got killed by a landmine in 1996. In another incident in late 2012 her son Ibrahim was badly injured while her 6-year-old grandson Tarik was fatally wounded and died in the arms of his father.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors 5
Zivinice, Bosnia
By Michael Biach
30 Sep 2013

Ajka Ibrahimovic (50) was badly injured during an explosion ordnance (UXO) incident in 1995. Until today Ajka has shrapnel pieces inside her body and lungs. Removing them in an operation would be too dangerous. A shrapnel inside her lung can be seen as a white point on this x-ray.