Illness: Editor's Picks

Collection with 18 media items created by Transterra Editor

13 Dec 2013 16:00

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Health in Uganda (35 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows , a baby girl, affected by the guinea worm, in severe conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Guinea worm, is another serious pathology, in remote areas of Uganda.

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Health in Uganda (34 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Grace, a one and half years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in severe conditions, in Luweero general hospital and her mother taking care of her. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a young mother, is looking after at her daughter, seriously affected by the Dracunculus Medinensis, also known as Guinea worm disease,that is caused by the large female nematode, Dracunculus Medinensis, which is among the longest nematodes infecting humans. The adult female is primarily larger than the adult male. Mature female worms migrate along subcutaneous tissues to reach the skin below the knee, forming a painful ulcerating blister. They can also emerge from other parts of the body, such as the head, torso, upper extremities, buttocks, and genitalia. A person gets infected, by drinking water from stagnant sources (e.g., ponds) contaminated with copepods containing immature forms of the parasite (juveniles), which have been previously released from the skin of a definitive host. The infection can also be acquired by eating a fish paratenic host, but this is rare. The parasite is known to be found mostly in some West-African countries .

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (13 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
12 Jul 2007

Kelebe Adamu (R) is helping to feed a young daughter (C) of one of the women working at the workshop in the lepers slum of Northern Addis Ababa, July 11 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Young kids, too young to watch after themselves stay with their parents inside the workshop.

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The Daily Dose | Tuberculosis in Camb...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

Hands of a patient receiving medications for the day from an NGO community health worker.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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Isolation | Tuberculosis in Cambodia
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

An old patient waiting for TB test results in Phnom Penh. The patients admitted in the government hospitals are kept in separate wards away from the administration and other areas.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Bor...
Azaz, Syria
By Ben Taub
03 Apr 2013

Transit Camp, A’zaz, SYRIA

“My wife will die if she doesn’t have heart surgery in three or four days,” Asad Hoammed lamented as he prepared tea in his UN refugee tent. But getting the operation first requires getting her out of war-torn Syria and into a Turkish hospital that would somehow be willing to treat her for free.

It’s been more than a month since Mr. Hoammed and his wife left their hometown of Tall Rifat seeking Turkish medical care, but having no money to begin a new life outside Syria has made the crossing impossible. Instead, they ended up in a refugee transit camp on the northern border with roughly 13,000 other Syrians waiting either to get into Turkey or for the war to end so they can go home and rebuild.

Most fled intense violence and shelling in and around Aleppo.

The tea was still too hot to drink, so Mr. Hoammed lit a cigarette. He took a slow drag as Syrian regime fighter jets bombed rebels laying siege to a military airport a few miles away. The distant thundering rattled none and inspired a few prayers for those likely killed, but the proximity posed no risk. Those few miles make a serious difference, as the transit camp is situated at the edge of the Turkish border. Any approaching jet would risk obliteration by Turkish air defenses.

Still, the transit camp isn’t a safe place to live. “One person is sick in every tent,” insisted the men gathered on Mr. Hoammed’s tarp floor. They blamed it on dirty drinking water.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged the spread of disease is a dire situation but disputed that refugees’ drinking water is tainted in any way. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

According to Dr. Al-Nasr, Turkish authorities will grant access and free hospital care if failure to perform a major operation would have urgent and imminent consequences. But how imminent is imminent? Mr. Hoammed thinks his wife has just a few days left to live, and that any action now may be too little, too late.

He paused for a moment, then reached for a plastic bag hanging from the tent wall from which he produced a coin-purse full of pills and a small Chinese charm sent by a business contact in Beijing two years ago. That was when his wife first fell ill. “This charm is to protect her health,” wrote the Chinese businessman.

At that time, Mr. Hoammed worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government. Soon after the war began, he defected and returned home to Tall Rifat. His two sons picked up arms a few months later, Abdel with the Free Syrian Army and Hamoud with Jabhat al-Nusra, the well-trained Islamist faction that also hopes to take down the Syrian regime.

Mr. Hoammed hasn’t seen his sons since he and his ill wife arrived at the transit camp in late February. Tonight he intends to plead his case and seek free crossing and heart surgery for the woman he has lived with and loved through war and peace.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
03 Jul 2012

After seven years of suffering from diabetes and no access to adequate treatment and nutrition, 49-years old Rodrigo lays in bed, waiting for his last moment in his small home in San Jorge La Laguna, Guatemala. This father of five children has been in and out of hospital frequently. He chose not to return there to spare his family from financial difficulties.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
03 Jul 2012

After seven years of suffering from diabetes and no access to proper treatment and nutrition, 49-years old Rodrigo lays in bed, waiting for his last moment in his small home in San Jorge La Laguna, Guatemala. This father of five children has been in and out of hospital frequently. He chose not to return there to spare his family from financial difficulties.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their lack of basic necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Positive is negative: HIV/AIDS in the...
Wamena, Indonesia
By Carolincik
01 Feb 2013

ARV medicine is free in Papua, but there are only two different types available. S. (14) has suffered from painful rashes and skin problems since she started her treatment, but there are no alternative ARV cocktails available.

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Health in Uganda (11 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda-March 10, 2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a woman affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Positive is negative: HIV/AIDS in the...
Wamena, Indonesia
By Carolincik
01 Feb 2013

A women's disfigured hands tell of a long history of loss. Traditionally Dani women amputate a finger everytime a close member of the family deceases.

The fact that HIV infection is higher among ethnic Papuans is representative of greater socio-economic inequalities. Much remains to be done to reach the United Nations Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS and the Millennium Development goals. In Papua, the severity of the situation has been completely underestimated by the authorities and so far, their response to the epidemic has been severely inadequate. In order to decrease dissatisfaction with their rule, a general attitude of the Indonesian government has been to provide local governments in Papua with large amounts of money. It is then assigned to various programs without proper preliminary research and subsequent monitoring. The actual causes of the problem however, are rarely tackled. The poor standards or complete lack of health services and education throughout the region not only facilitate the spread of the disease, they also severely impede any efficient response to the epidemic. Indeed, although the provincial governments have made HIV testing and treatment free, many Papuans do not have access to health care or education and are unlikely to be reached by awareness raising campaigns any time soon. In the meantime, the virus continues its deadly advance into the highlands.

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The Death of a Village
Sawantwadi, Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
11 Mar 2013

Thirty-eight yea-old Kishan Chauhan lost his leg to gangrene after a lesion caused by arsenic poisoning became infected

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Kill Me Quick (10 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

Shahrukh Hussain started drinking Changaa when he was stabbed in the eye. He was assaulted by young boys "high" on the drink when they stole 3,000 ksh (34 usd) from him. The other eye became septic and he lost all vision. "I had no eyes, no job, no shelter - what else was I to do, but drink?" he said.

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The Will Of Maickel
Caracas, Venezuela
By @LatAmSight
15 Aug 2012

Maickel Melamed was born in 1975 with a physical motor deficiency. In 2011 he ran the New York marathon. This year he will run in Berlin. Maickel has run five marathons in four years, when just one was supposedly impossible.

Maickel training indoors, B Roll:

“En ese momento cuando crees que no, es donde sigues. En ese momento donde todo te dice oscuridad, es donde tú crees en la luz así no la veas. Todo lo contrario: cuando no ves la luz, es cuando más la atraes."

“In that exactly moment when you think you can’t make it, you just have to keep going. That moment where everything says dark, is where you believe in light, even if you cannot see it. When you can’t see the light, is when you most attract it.”

Maickel training outdoors:

“Si a mí me dijeron que yo no iba a vivir, me dijeron que yo no iba a caminar, me dijeron que yo no iba a subir montañas, me dijeron que yo no iba a hablar bien y soy conferencista desde hace más de diez años.”

“I was told that I would die, that I would never walk, that I would never climb a mountain that I would never talk properly, and I have been speaking in lectures for more than 10 years.”

Maickel Melamed:

“A cada no le fuimos poniendo un sí, y ese es el sí que le queremos regalar a cada ser humano.”

“Instead of NO we say YES, and that YES is our gift to every single human being.”

Maritza de Melamed, Maickel's mother:

“Él, como dice su papá, como que se prueba y a la vez es algo como una función que él tiene una cosa que él tiene como un deber, cómo te puedo decir yo, como algo así que él mismo se lo ha propuesto.”

“He, as his father says, he (Maickel) tests himself, and at the same time it is like a duty he must accomplish, as I can tell you, he meets what he proposes.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Sentía que cada vez que yo hacía algo, que me llevaba más allá de mis propios límites, los límites de mi entorno también se expandían, entonces entendí que eso era quizá la diferencia que yo tengo para aportar.”

“I was feeling that every time that I’ve achieved something that took me beyond my limits, my limits were expanded as well, then I think that maybe that is the difference with what I have to give.”

Maickel training outdoors, B Roll:

“Y vivimos buscando nuestra diferencia y yo creo que esa es nuestra búsqueda primaria cuál es nuestra diferencia."

“We live looking for that which makes us different, I believe that this is our main basic quest, what sets us apart.”

Mr. and Mrs. Melamed, B Roll:

“Yo le diría a todos esos padres que tienen una situación como la que se me presentó a mí, de que..."

“I would to like say all those fathers who have a situation as I've been presented with Maickel, that...”

Alberto Melamed, Maickel's father:

“esos muchachos vinieron a esta vida por algo, y nosotros estamos en la obligación de darles todo el cariño y todo el apoyo que podemos darles para poderlos sacar adelante.”

“...this guy came into this life for something, and we are under the obligation to give them all the love and care, and all the support that we can, to keep them moving forward by themselves.”

Crossing the finish line, NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Maickel training, B Roll:

“El entrenamiento es muy intenso, son seis días a la semana, aproximadamente tres horas y media diarias a veces más, hay largos de ocho horas y media de entrenamiento.”

“Training is quite intense, six days per week, almost four hours per day, but sometimes we reach almost nine hours.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Es un entrenamiento muy intenso diseñado específicamente para mi persona, cada ser humano es diferente.”

“Is a very tough training, specially designed for me, every human is different.”

Photos:
“Esto es dedicado a todos esos seres humanos que tienen esos sueños adentro y que están esperando una chispita para despertarlos e ir en búsqueda de ellos.”

“This is dedicated to those human beings that have dreams, for those who are waiting for something to spark their life, wake up and go for it.”

End of NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Short Documentary
Country: Venezuela
Director: Placido Garrido
Editorial Producer: Alvaro Mendoza Saad
@LAtAmSight 2012

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