Africa: Editor's Picks

Collection with 14 media items created by Transterra Editor

11 Dec 2013 16:00

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Origin Rwanda (17 of 30)
Rwanda
By jonathankalan
26 Jul 2012

Rwanda was the first African country to hold the "Cup of Excellence", one of the world's most prestigeous specialty coffee competitions, in 2008. Now in it's 4th year in Rwanda, Liana Ishinwe, 25, scores coffee for the Cup of Excellence Pre-Trials. Kayonza, Rwanda.

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Origin Rwanda (15 of 30)
Rwanda
By jonathankalan
07 Jun 2011

Fresh cherries are depulped to separate the seeds/parchment from the soft flesh. For premium coffee, cherries must be depulped quickly after they are picked or they will become bitter.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

They build artificial bases and dams at the river bank where they wash the soil day and night to find the gold.

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (1 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

A soft drink is advertised in the Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya.
Statistics talk about a range between 350,000 and 1 million people living in the slum: it is the biggest one in Africa and one of the biggest in the world.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (12 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
07 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Stephen Lewagat from the anti poaching unit during a patrol in Tsavo East game park in Kenya 7 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

Those who carry the sacks from the mine to the river bank walk up to 1000 meters with the bags on their head. They get 15 meticals (half of an American dollar) per sack they deliver to the river. On average, they deliver 48 to 50 sacks a day Mozambique 2013.

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Ethiopian Women Living With Leprosy (...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
13 Aug 2007

Leprosy has been for many centuries, in Ethiopia, a sickness with enormous social implications. The physical consequences of catching such an illness has forced many infected by the disease into a solitary life or, at best, into leper’s colonies through out the country. With medicinal progress and campaigns to explain to locals that leprosy is not contagious amongst humans, some understanding of the illness has made headway in the country. Such a change can be seen in the capital where an entire hospital was built, mostly with European money, to deal with this lingering sickness. The Alert hospital, as locals commonly name it, specializes in skin illnesses, and mostly with leprosy. Situated in the heart of a leper colony in Southern Addis Ababa where thousands of lepers live and raise their families. It treats thousands of people each year, locals often coming from far away in remote areas to get treatment. The hallways are usually loaded with dozens of families from the countryside, bringing sick family members, often after a long and tenuous travel. They wait for a day or two sometimes to see a specialized doctor. For the really ones, rooms are available almost free of cost, as foreign money keeps the institution afloat. The doctors, cladded in white are always available separating lepers from infectious diseases, putting the most sick in specially equipped rooms, which usually contains 6 to 8 beds. Operations, like amputation, a rather common affair, in the world of leprosy are always done inside the hospital by specially trained surgeon. The presence of the Alert hospital in the slum has changed the life of many lepers in Ethiopia, but foremost has saved thousands of lives living inside this ghetto where local official rarely venture. Constant danger, rampant poverty, and no sanitation has left thousands living inside this slum stranded outside Ethiopian society with no hope to climb the social ladder. The slum was created, like so many before it, to forget the leprosy problem, seen as an evil due to its quite graphic nature, scaring for life the unfortunates who contract the sickness. Inside the slum, women with leprosy cover themselves with a white sheet as to be recognized, covering their faces to stop starring or fear from healthy Ethiopians. But not all is bleak. A group of women with leprosy have gotten together to fight their condition. They created a small business where a dozen or so of these women knit and put together traditional garments and bed sheets. Using their bare hands and ancients machinery, these women have managed to organize a small business where they can earn a small salary from their sales. Kelebe, 60 years old, is one of these women. She arrived in the slum from the Northern part of the country to start over and perhaps find a better life after her husband died. She brought with her, her children, cousins, and other relatives, to increase their chances of survival. Once there, she was quickly reminded that her condition would not make things life easy for her and her family. She managed to find a shack made out of mud with metal roofing, and dirt floors. She, however did not give up, and joined these businesswomen. The fruit of her work has helped her to feed herself as well as her family members. In fact it has allowed her to prosper, buy new close and give some schooling to the youngest in her family. With an ongoing fix price of 50$ for the most expensive bedding, the little company has been able to sustain itself for a few years now, feeding a dozen family. However this small grouping seem to be the exception to the rule. Most lepers in the slum keep starving; their offspring have no more future than their parents did before them, and the government seems uninterested in helping this portion of the population.

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Health in Uganda (18 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows two women affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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God is Great
Gulu, Uganda
By Amy Hume
21 Dec 2011

EOW General Burney MC on the bus to Gulu to organize a Hip Hop event in the North.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (1 of 20)
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
10 Jul 2007

An old leper man is sitting on a side of the road in the leper's slum in Northern Addis Ababa showing his faith in Jesus July 10 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Locals are devout Christians, showing their faith in their everyday lives; it also allows them believe in a future cure.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (6 of 20)
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Jul 2007

Kelbe Adamu is marching towards the main local church for her daily appreance inside the slum for lepers of Addis Ababa July 15, 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Many lepers from the slum go to this church each day to pray, and believe that this will help them get better.

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Lost In The Jungle (5 of 31)
Etaeto, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
10 Sep 2012

Kalibo Mandigo - Etaeto - Democratic Republic of Congo - September 10th, 2012

The hunt for precious coltan is killing Africa's dwindling Pygmy population. The village of Kalibo Mandigo, located in the Ituri rain forest in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, lies in the heart of an obscure war zone that few in the West know about. The densely forested expanse along a stretch of border between the nation once known as Zaire and Uganda, furnishes some 80 percent of planet's Columbite Tantalite, or "coltan," an ore that is an essential ingredient in the creation of the miniature Tantalum capacitors present in virtually all electronic devices, including laptops, cell phones and pagers. Coltan is panned for by hand in much the same way as gold during the California gold rush of the 19th century. The demand by major companies such as Nokia and Sony for coltan (Australia is the other major source) has made the Congo into a battleground for rogue miners, who enter the country, through Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi. The number of Pygmies is in constant decline as a result of the border fighting. On the move constantly, the pygmies, who are considered inferior, face the wrath of Congolese troops and Rwandan raiders who cross the border seeking the coltan. They were victims of rape, murder and cannibalism. According to Minority Rights Group International there is extensive evidence of mass killing, cannibalism and rape of Pygmies and they have urged the International Criminal Court to investigate a campaign of extermination against pygmies. Although they have been targeted by virtually all the armed groups, much of the violence against Pygmies is attributed to the rebel group, Movement for the Liberation of Congo.

The picture shows a pygmi hunter, with his bow and arrows, before starting the hunting.