Editor's Picks 2 August 2013

Collection with 8 media items created by Transterra Editor

02 Aug 2013 08:00

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POLISARIO Soldier
Liberated Territories, Western Sahara
By Docphot
11 May 2011

This POLISARIO Solider stands in front of a converted Landcruiser which has been fitted with a heavy machine gun.

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God is Great
Gulu, Uganda
By Amy Hume
21 Dec 2011

EOW General Burney MC on the bus to Gulu to organize a Hip Hop event in the North.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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LP Street Gangs in Citee du Soleil, H...
Cite Soleil, Haiti
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
06 Feb 2013

The Haitian LP Street gang is one of many gangs controlling the various slumps found through out the capital Port-au-Prince in Haiti. Some gangs are more violent then others. The most hardcore ones control their turf using intimidation and violence with guns smuggled to Haiti via the US or South America. Murders are a common site in the Haitian capital where most of the 2.5 million souls live in poverty. Certain parts of Port-au-Prince, like Citee du Soleil are as dangerous as the famous favelas of Rio.
Basha, the leader of the LP Street gang is not just a gang leader, but also a community organizer. As the Haitian government has mostly failed its people after the earthquake of 2010, Basha and his 16 strong groups of soldiers have taken upon themselves to help the people living within his zone of influence. His second hand man, Sam, helps him with all tasks that might be needed to assure the gang’s survival. From acquiring weapons to drugs, or taking cuts on the profit from the local whorehouse, the LP street gang, in that sense resembles many of the other gangs involved in crime in Port-au-Prince. However Basha and his main soldier, Sam, who grew up in Florida, have decided to also help locals but forcing politicians to listen to them.
Basha will spend time organizing meetings with ministers to open their eyes on the current situation people are living in. To this date, tenth of thousands of Haitians still living in tent cities spread out around the capital, adding to the already deep fracture of Haitian society. LP gang members go around the various camps in their zone of influence breaking up fights, easing tensions, or trying to have bathrooms and electricity built in the camps. With some success, the LP street gang has managed to assert its authority on the people.
Other gangs in the capital also control various parts of the capital, with Citee du Soleil, being the most dangerous of all the slums in Port-au-Prince. Citee du Soleil, known for its violence, and gun battles, is also a meeting ground for gangs if discussions are needed. In 2010, right after the earthquake UN troops battled their way inside the area to flush out gang soldiers, killing dozens in the process. Today, the gangs have taken control of the Citee du Soleil slums once more. The LP street gang have, overtime, establish strong connections with the though gangs controlling the area. Deals are made, information is passed long, making sure, and everyone gets a cut of the action.
The LP street gang lead by Basha and his man Sam, are hopeful that Haiti’s future will be bright, but as tensions are rising once more within the small nation, the gangs are ready at all times to make their mark with the use of weapons and extortions. The LPs are no exceptions.

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Kill Me Quick (8 of 10)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
27 Jan 2013

A common occurance in Mathare slum: lying semi-conscious in the middle of the street due to a heavy Changaa drinking session.

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Children On Death Row In Yemen (8 of 8)
Sana'a, Yemen
By dustweare
06 Feb 2013

Abdul Aziz, 16, has been disowned by his family and after an incorrect age assessment test, is now at high risk of being executed.

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Red Light Districts: A Story About Pr...
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
By newspoint
29 Sep 2012

Sonagachi is one of Calcutta’s largest red light districts – narrow alleys, lined with small ‘apartments’ and corner stores form a confusing and nightmarish maze. The buildings lean into the street, the roads are crowded, it’s hot. The city seems to want to eat itself. Sonagachi is one of the very few places in India where women have a higher street profile than men. That’s because most of them are prostitutes. Approximately 9000 women, many of them trafficked into the country from Bangladesh or Nepal, work in Sonagachi. Around 60.000 more sex workers are active across Calcutta.

In overcrowded India things don’t come in small measures. Two and a half million women and
children (around 500.000 prostitutes in India are under 16) are working in the country’s sex industry.
More than 5 million people are already HIV positive. Governments, both local and national, do little
to tackle the increasing risk of a large-scale AIDS epidemic. Large red light areas like Sonagachi are
at the centre of a problem that may soon spiral out of control and affect millions of people in Bengal
and the neighbouring state of Bihar. Sex workers are socially shunned and prostitution is illegal,
which makes the women in Sonagachi extremely susceptible to extortion, blackmail, rape or murder
by local gangsters, pimps and the police.

Byte: Sudeshna Basu Mukharjee, Sociologist

Byte: Pinki, Sex worker

“I am living at this place as a mother no one wants to live. I want to make my children’s future bright , When we’ll get older then our children will not going to support us.”

Byte: Juhi Tamang, Teacher

“My mother does not want me to join this field. Till the time I can do work hard, I’ll do.”