Orphan Education in Rural Uganda

Collection with 15 media items created by Mais Istanbuli ★★★★★

25 Jul 2012 08:00

With the support of a local charity, young orphans from the Conde Hill Orphanage are given the opportunity to attend the Young Cranes Primary School in Bombo, Uganda. The children lost their parents to HIV/AIDS and have no other adequate guardians to make sure they acquire the proper education they need in Uganda’s meager economy. Although Uganda is the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to implement both a universal primary and secondary education through the elimination of school fees, Young Cranes Primary School faces poor conditions and lack of sufficient resources. Neighboring countries are also determined to provide the best education they can to those in need, yet their economic struggles and poor living standards often complicate the process. 
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Uganda East Africa Education Youth School Children Rural Hiv Human Interest Poverty Collection Photo Essay Photo Collec...

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Education in Rural Uganda (1 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Early in the morning, Nico, Teo, Tina, Nakato and Eva of Conde Hill Orphanage run to school. Many have lost family because of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Uganda. Teo and Tina, for example, are 8 year-old twin girls who were homeless for two years after losing their family to HIV/AIDS. Conde Hill founder Gideon Mubiru, who lost 37 of his 39 siblings to HIV/AIDS, took them in. Over time Tina had grown to be skeptical of outsiders, so the members of Conde Hill had a tough challenge to overcome. Furthermore, Teo has a mental disability that places her a year behind her sister. Because of support from local charity Gideon Anti-AIDS Foundation (GAAF), these students are given the chance to attend school each day. Slowly, students like Tina and Teo can learn to smile again in the wake of this new educational opportunity. GAFF covers the cost of housing, food and uniforms for the students.

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Education in Rural Uganda (2 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

Young Cranes Primary consist of three tin roofed brick building and adjoining thatched straw rooms. As many as 70% percent of rural schools lack adequate classrooms, and lessons are often held outside.

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Education in Rural Uganda (3 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

A primary teacher reviews a math lesson prior to a test the following day. Students take their lessons in English, but often have teachers who are unqualified for the subjects being taught or lack the needed textbooks. Many qualified teachers remain in urban areas in order to have running water and electricity.

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Education in Rural Uganda (4 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
24 Jul 2012

Education is highly valued in Uganda, and the government's aim to offer universal access to primary and secondary education reflect this. However, the delivery of programs is marred by resource and personnel shortages. Additionally, more than 1.5 million youth will not enter secondary school each year.

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Education in Rural Uganda (5 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

One of the children from Conde Hill, Teo Babirye, has a learning disability that prevents her from progressing at a level similar to that of other students in the class. However, her teacher Moreen Nakiboneka takes the time each day to work with Teo in order to help her. Moreen is a recently-graduation teacher, still full of passion despite her discouraging working conditions, a passion that helps her teach Teo and Tina. Teo's twin sister, Tina Nakato has moved on to a year higher than her. Even though Tina is in a different class, she's often caught walking by the classroom to check on her sister.

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Education in Rural Uganda (6 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Like all other teachers in Young Cranes Primary School, Moreen Nakiboneka teaches in English, a historical nod to Uganda's colonial past. She is a recent graduate from university, and confided that while she loves teaching, the pay, only $150 a month, isn't enough for her to make ends meet. She does, however, command the respect of the village elders and her students.

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Education in Rural Uganda (7 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

The rich red dirt paths that link the small village leave their mark on the children. More than 90% of Ugandans live in a rural area, with attendance rates in these areas lower than in urban hubs.

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Education in Rural Uganda (8 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

The literacy rate in Uganda is high for youth (15-24 years), standing at almost 90%, but dips to 73% for adults.

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Education in Rural Uganda (9 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

Chalk slates are used by many of the students, another symptom of resource shortages. Relative to incomes, notebooks can prove to be costly.

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Education in Rural Uganda (10 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

A brief break in between lessons leads to some curious looks by the students. The classroom of second primary, while suffering from a chronic lack of resources, is brought to life by the laughs and shouts of the students.

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Education in Rural Uganda (11 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

Many of the classrooms are minimally equipped and rely on old, often out of date texts. Teachers are forced to make do with the resource shortage. Moreen Nakiboneka teaches in a classroom illuminated only by the soft rays of light streaming through the windows. She is also one of the lucky teachers. In rural areas, government-run schools often have high student/teacher ratios and many will lack electricity. In some areas, there are as many as 200 students to 1 teacher.

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Education in Rural Uganda (12 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
24 Jul 2012

As the afternoon sun hangs low in the sky, it's tempting to view the prospects for these children, as they go up against a plethora of problems, as being bleak. Uganda's struggle for economic growth still hinges on fixing its education woes. Calls for more money in education are growing, 45% of the Ugandan population are youth and children.

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Education in Rural Uganda (13 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Students take a break between lessons in Young Cranes Primary. While education is universal, fees for meals, supplies and uniforms still place a large financial burden on many families.

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Education in Rural Uganda (14 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Teo (left) and Tina (right) can be playful, but Tina is still very protective of her sister.