Editor's Picks 4 July 2013

Collection with 11 media items created by Editor's Picks

04 Jul 2013 08:00

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Tahrir Square, July 3 (12 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Mat Wolf
04 Jul 2013

Crowds in Giza marching to Tahrir Square celebrate the arrival of security forces shortly after the Egyptian military's 48-hour ultimatum for President M0hammed Morsi to share power has expired on July 3, 2013.

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (12 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
07 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Stephen Lewagat from the anti poaching unit during a patrol in Tsavo East game park in Kenya 7 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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Garbage City (29 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A car is transporting a massive amount of to be recycled material into the slum.

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Bosnia: Divided Peace
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By carloscastro
01 Jun 2011

The long way towards peace starts just after the signature of the peace agreements, when the complex and difficult process of building peace, memory, truth, reconciliation and justice for all the victims begins. The documentaries of the ‘After Peace' project seek to analyze and explain different ways taken by various countries who suffered an armed conflict in the last quarter of the 20th century. Researchers, activists for peace and reconciliation, victims, lawyers and educators expose what has been done and what has been ignored in their countries and talk about their experiences.
The Dayton Peace Accords divided Bosnia Herzegovina into two entities. The deal left a "very complicated system, as it was created in order to protect the fragile ethnic balance at all levels," says Srecko Latal, an analyst of the International Crisis Group. Moreover, the consequences of Dayton are still tangible in society. The education system segregates students by their ethnic, thousands of people live in camps while others search for their missing relatives. Nowadays, forgiveness is still far but part of civil society believes in reconciliation and work to achieve it and for the reparation of the victims.

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LEBANON: Pact of Silence
Lebanon
By carloscastro
01 Jun 2011

SYNOPSIS:
Those who fought the war imposed silence. They could do so because they still have power. The political elite in Lebanon neither assumed their guilt in a conflict that pitted the country's communities nor held external actors accountable for their participation. Their objective has been to build a new country over the ruins of the old one in order to forget the war. The words justice, truth and reconciliation are not on the political agenda, but there are voices still crying courageous. "I can not reconcile with the criminal if I do not know the truth. Then I will decide whether to forgive or not", says Wadada Halwani, president of the Committee of Families of the Kidnapped and Missing persons in Lebanon.

The long way towards peace starts just after the signature of the peace agreements, when the complex and difficult process of building peace, memory, truth, reconciliation and justice for all the victims begins. The documentaries of the ‘After Peace' project seek to analyze and explain different paths taken by various countries who suffered an armed conflict in the last quarter of the 20th century. Researchers, activists for peace and reconciliation, victims, lawyers and educators expose what has been done and what has been ignored in their countries and talk about their experiences.

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Guatemala: Rescuing the memory
Guatemala
By carloscastro
30 Jul 2012

After its war, Guatemala had two Truth Commissions, one driven by the UN and the other by the Church. Both reports agree that the State is responsible for the majority of crimes committed during the conflict. They further point out that the State committed acts of genocide against the Mayan population. There were over 600 massacres like the one occurred on the community of Plan de Sánchez, that each year commemorates the crime. Even today, after 16 years, Guatemala fights a permanent battle both against oblivion and for justice. Institutions such as the Guatemalan National Police Historical Archive, the Centre for Human Rights Legal Action or the Forensic Anthropology Foundation work -without the support of the State-, to repair victims still seeking a clue, those responsible for the disappearance of a family member or justice.

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Tahrir Square, July 2 (12 of 18)
Cairo, Egypt
By Mat Wolf
03 Jul 2013

Anti-Morsi crowds pack into Tahrir square to demonstrate for the ouster of the Egyptian President on July 2, 2013.

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Remembering Srebrenica (9 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2011

Woman crying over her relative's coffin inside the hangar of Potochari before burial ceremony

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Hundreds of signatures on rebel state...
Cairo, Egypt
By elmasdr
17 May 2013

Activists in Egypt collected hundreds of signatures for a rebel statement campaign from Egyptian citizens against Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi and Muslim brotherhood.

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Egypt's Revolutionary Artist's Union
Cairo, Egypt
By Kevin McAfee
01 Jul 2011

A short produced video about a group of artists who occupy Tahrir Square to promote peaceful artwork about the Egyptian revolution.

Matching article with photo illustration can be found at: www.kevin-mcafee.com

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Uprising Preview
Cairo, Egypt
By f.stanton
16 Apr 2012

In January 2011, millions of Egyptians took to the streets in a spontaneous eruption against thirty years of oppression under the regime of Hosni Mubarak. Communicating via Facebook and Twitter, the largely peaceful protesters braved tear gas, beatings, and live bullets in the hope of facing down security forces and overthrowing the government. Over eight hundred lost their lives, and several thousand were arrested and tortured by security forces.
“Uprising” tells the story of the Egyptian revolution from the perspective of those who participated, their struggle for freedom against tremendous odds, their sacrifice, and the courage and ingenuity that allowed them to succeed. Using footage of the revolution as well as interviews with key organizers and participants, “Uprising” provides a behind-the scenes view of one of the most dramatic events of our generation. Many of those profiled were arrested, some were tortured, several were shot. All of them describe it as the most meaningful and rewarding event of their lives. The film explores the frustrations that had built for decades, the role of social media in unleashing the revolution, the youth and courage that changed a nation, and the implications for the future. Their success in forcing the downfall of the regime, one of the most significant foreign policy developments since the fall of the Berlin Wall, has changed the face of the Middle East and provided hope for millions of oppressed people across the world. The Egyptian revolution was unique, in its use of technology, in its youth, and in its scale, and it happened at the heart of a region that is especially important and fragile. Above all, it is a story of profound hope, of courage rewarded, of a people who in a spontaneous, peaceful eruption beat back a police state and threw off the shackles of decades of degradation and oppression.