Editor's Picks 28 June 2013

Collection with 9 media items created by Editor's Picks

28 Jun 2013 08:00

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Gezi Gets Gassed (33 of 46)
Istanbul, Turkey
By umutvedat
19 Jun 2013

A journalist captures the moment with his camera.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
19 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (5 of 12)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A boy carries crockery at a pottery workshop in Gaza which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (10 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

A grandmother practice self defence techniques with other grandmothers 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Bedouin Women Struggling through Trad...
Arish, Egypt
By zeer news
21 May 2013

Background:

The place of women within the tribal system of the Bedouins of North Sinai is very restricted and anchored to very specific traditions. The situation of Bedouin women, in fact, is connected to the tribal structure. In the Bedouin culture, the status of families is determined by their size. Women are thus both venerated and marginalized to the role of "birth givers". 
Therefore, Bedouin women are obliged to marry as soon as possible and they are subject not only to a strict cultural code, but also to a strict sexual code of conduct. Each individual, through his action, represents his family as a whole in the society. Each shameful or not acceptable conduct will damage the honor of the entire family. 
Being subject to these strict codes and rules, only a very small minority of Bedouin women have access to the public sphere and to social life outside the domestic walls.
In this reportage it will be shown the voices of both Bedouin and Egyptian women and men, that are fighting for a social change for Bedouin women, and that explain the situation for women in Sinai.

Selwa el Hirsh, an active woman of the Billi tribe of Rabaa (near Bir el Abd) shows her struggle in trying to enable Bedouin women to integrate in the economical sphere of their families through handicraft. She explains the importance of women in participating in the economy of the family.
Mona Barhoum, is an activist in Rafah, engaged on women and development issues. She gave more then 5000 ID to Bedouin women and she run as a candidate in the last parliamentary elections.
Sheikh Arafat, a sufi sheikh of the tribe of the Sawarka, is the director of the Al Gora Society (in al Gora, in the nearby of Sheikh Zwaid), an NGO working on human rights and development in Sinai.
Said Hytaiek is a Bedouin activist of Sheikh Zwaid, explaining how the policies of the last 30 years on Sinai didn't bring any progress on the women issues in the region.
Sheikh Goma el Tarrabin, a member of the most facultous families of the Tarrabin, and very famous smuggler, explains ( only audio) the traditions and marriage in the tribal system.
Sheikh Abd el Hendy, an Orfi judge (the traditional Bedouin legislation) of Chabaana, in the nearby of Sheikh Zwaid explains the legislative status of women in the Bedouin traditions.

Shotlist:

00:00 - 01:00 Selwa El Hirsh: “In the name of Allah my name is Selwa el Hirsh, a leader for the women of North Sinai. I am a Bedouin, the tribe of Baradeya, family el-Hirsh.
We have here six places: Bir el Abd, Sinai is Bir el Abd, el Arish, this is the capital, Sheikh Zwaid, Rafah, el-Hassala, Nekhel. We have six areas in North Sinai. Women in the past were very weak, she tried to cultivate to help her husband to grow her boys, girls in the house. There is no learning, no culture, nothing, only she was growing some sheep in the house.”

Images: man on the beach of el-Arish, el Arish University, militaries walking on the beach of el Arish, Chabaana (Sheikh Zwaid )peach trees, palm trees of the beach of El Arish, rooftops and building of el Arish, Orfi tribunal in Chabaana, fruit trees in Bir el Abd, woman with child in her balcony, children playing in Rabaa village, sheep in cage in Chaabana.

01:00- 02:04 Sheikh Arafat (director of Al-Gora Society): “Despite all the services we do for women, there is still a lot of challenges in Sinai community because of the uneducated ones and because the women they cannot finish their education in so many places in this region. And the other places the girls leaving school in the primary school because there are no preparatory or high schools for them. At some other places they stop at high schools because there are no universities and sometimes the university is too far and not easy to reach.”

Images: Bedouin men in peach trees in Chabaana, Flyer of Al-Gora Society activities on women, two Bedouin women in traditional clothes and baby, particular of the mother holding the baby, Bedouin women and the baby, village of Sheikh Zwaid with girls and donkey chariot.

02:04- 02:34 Said Hytaiek (activist):
“The women in Sinai suffer a lot because she lives in a men community that does not believe in the woman goal nor the woman rights. And she lives in a community that puts her role only inside the house.”

Images: Women with Niqab and baby walking in the street, main street of El Arish.

02:34- 03:11 Goma Tarrabin (Tarrabin rich man and smuggler):
“My name is Goma Abu Sahba Tarabin tribe, Sinai, Egyptian citizen like any other Egyptian citizen, Muslim, Arab and we have our custom and tradition in our community that we cannot change. The women’s state in Sinai is not like anywhere else. And because of our customs and traditions that we have for long time, from our grand-grandparents, we can’t change the women state in 10 or 20 years.”

Images: Bedouin men and children in a Bedouin hut on the beach of el Arish, children in the hut, beach of el Arish, Bedouin man preparing Shisha.

03:11– 03:38 Selwa el Hirsh:
“We have here rules, in Sinai, between the tribes. We have rules. No one from the other tribes can touch me. Ok? We have rules here, but now no one care about the rules, women not safe, families not safe, the adults not safe.”

03:38- 04:11 Goma Tarrabin:
“one of the problems women faces in Sinai is education, marriage, even in growing up their children and sometimes the husband gets married more than two or three times. The average of getting married in the Bedouin community starts from 16.”

Images: Bedouin women with children, two Bedouin women (one working) with children, Bedouin teenager girls preparing tea on the seaside.

04:11- 05:39 Judge Abd el Hady (Orfi judge):
“I am el haj abdel hady atteia hassan, from Ashira el Mansoureya, I am an Orfi judge. And one of the most important people in Sinai. The Orfi law is when the people have some problems and they have to sit with Orfi to solve the disputes. The society gives to women a lot of options, a lot of freedom, for ex is she can go to all the houses, so now she is a strange person there, so the father of the house deals with her like if he was her owner. If she wants to divorce she can. If she wants rights, give her the rights. She goes to Massaid and Massaid take a lot of care of her.”

Images: particular of hands taking a cigarette, inside the Bedouin Tribunal, men listening to the judge, three Bedouin men in the tribunal listening to the judge, portrait of one man listening to the judge, portrait of another Bedouin smoking a cigarette and listening to the judge, outside of the Tribunal judge talking with a man, zoom on judge talking with the man.

05:39- 06:59 Selwa el Hirsh:
“Some of us(women) are educated, and we have a job. But the others women here don't have a job, and she wants to help her husband, she wants to make something in the family, for her family. These productions help the family to have many money, so she is trying her husband to bring money to her, she want to increase the income of the family. Our grandmothers give us this: When I was a child my mother gave me one piece and she asked me to look at her and to teach me how to do it. Since the childhood until she becomes an hold woman. All her life. If she increases the income, the Governorate increases its income, the country, all Egypt, increases its income. Our economy is low now, we want to raise our economy, by cultivating Sinai, by these productions, by make factories.”

Images: particular of hands of woman working on handicraft, Bedouin women working, other Bedouin woman sitting beside her husband while she works, handicraft clothes in the trade show in Arish University, Bedouin women laughing with her husband, Bedouin family sitting all together under the shadow of a tree while women are working, old Bedouin woman, market in Arish, manequins of women clothes.

06:59- 07:25 Said Hytaiek:
“ we want to have a civil country to give the woman all her rights, even Mubarak did not commit on the rights of the women and the state organizations they have never given any solutions to solve all the women’s problem in Sinai, or even all over Egypt.”

Images: Arish downtown, woman in Niqab with two daughters crossing the street, Arish downtown, two women (one veiled one in Niqab) with their children.

07:25- 07:48 Selwa el Hirsh:
“Hosni Mubarak government and Morsi government, all of them don't care about Sinai. They (the women) are trying, in politics, to have places in politics in Sinai, on the TV, they want to appear to speak about problems in Sinai.”

Images: Selwa presenting handicraft products made by Bedouin women, Selwa talking with a man.

07:48- 08:56 Mona Barhoum (political activist):
“The situation of women in Sinai, is the same like all the Egyptian women. They got backward in everything that they gained before the revolution, like their membership in the local committees and making the decisions.
The main issue is that there is no faith in woman role in the political life by the political parties. And she is very welcome when she is voting, but she is not when she is a member. As Sinai people now we ask the actual government to invest and develop Sinai.”

Images: Mona walking in the entrance of the court, Mona with her cat, portrait of Bedouin woman in traditional clothes, two Bedouin women with kids in the garden of the house, Bedouin woman eating fruits from a tree, Mona going outside of her house.

08:56- 09:10 Selwa el Hirsh:
“Everything is related to the woman, Woman is member of this society. If the society is good the woman will be good, if the society is bad, the woman will be bad. Everything is back to us.”

Images : Bedouin girls playing a game on the sand.

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Burning Muslim Brotherhood Flag In Ca...
Downtown Cairo, Egypt
By elmasdr
19 Apr 2013

Activists burned a Muslim Brotherhood flag in Tallat Harb square along with thousands of protesters in front of the High Court, against Mohammed Morsi and the Brotherhood.

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Tahrir SQ is waiting
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Egypt
25 Jun 2012

Tahrir, cairo , june 24

protesters in Tahrir SQ, are waiting for election results .

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Egypt's Revolutionary Artist's Union
Cairo, Egypt
By Kevin McAfee
01 Jul 2011

A short produced video about a group of artists who occupy Tahrir Square to promote peaceful artwork about the Egyptian revolution.

Matching article with photo illustration can be found at: www.kevin-mcafee.com

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Uprising Preview
Cairo, Egypt
By f.stanton
16 Apr 2012

In January 2011, millions of Egyptians took to the streets in a spontaneous eruption against thirty years of oppression under the regime of Hosni Mubarak. Communicating via Facebook and Twitter, the largely peaceful protesters braved tear gas, beatings, and live bullets in the hope of facing down security forces and overthrowing the government. Over eight hundred lost their lives, and several thousand were arrested and tortured by security forces.
“Uprising” tells the story of the Egyptian revolution from the perspective of those who participated, their struggle for freedom against tremendous odds, their sacrifice, and the courage and ingenuity that allowed them to succeed. Using footage of the revolution as well as interviews with key organizers and participants, “Uprising” provides a behind-the scenes view of one of the most dramatic events of our generation. Many of those profiled were arrested, some were tortured, several were shot. All of them describe it as the most meaningful and rewarding event of their lives. The film explores the frustrations that had built for decades, the role of social media in unleashing the revolution, the youth and courage that changed a nation, and the implications for the future. Their success in forcing the downfall of the regime, one of the most significant foreign policy developments since the fall of the Berlin Wall, has changed the face of the Middle East and provided hope for millions of oppressed people across the world. The Egyptian revolution was unique, in its use of technology, in its youth, and in its scale, and it happened at the heart of a region that is especially important and fragile. Above all, it is a story of profound hope, of courage rewarded, of a people who in a spontaneous, peaceful eruption beat back a police state and threw off the shackles of decades of degradation and oppression.