Editor's Picks 25 June 2013

Collection with 5 media items created by Editor's Picks

25 Jun 2013 08:00

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São Paulo Protests Turn Violent (9 of...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
14 Jun 2013

A man tries to defend himself from attacks as police officers resorted to violent tactics to stop the protests that took over Sao Paulo in early June. Thousands of residents peacefully marched against an increase in the price of a single bus fare. Police officers were accused of firing bullets and tear gas at protesters and assaulting some participants and bystanders. The attacks that emerged angered the residents and shifted their focus from rising transport costs to wider issues. Sao Paulo, June, 2013.

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Rebel In Destroyed House Misrata (24-24)
Misrata, Tawergha, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
23 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (17 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Stateless Part 1
Kampala, Chicago, London, Geneva
By DocuProf
01 Jan 2013

Part 2 http://transterramedia.com/media/16897

PART 1
Since the 1994 Genocide, Rwandan refugees from that conflict- and from subsequent events- have created a population of over 150,000 (some say 250,00) living around the world.
In June of 2013, most of these refugees will lose their refugee status and be forced back to Rwanda by the UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees) and host countries.
The refugees fear repatriation to a country they see as oppressive, dictatorial and discriminatory.

This film explores why it is NOT a proper time to invoke this return by the UN and host countries.

It has interviews with major figures in refugee studies, Paul Rusesabagina (The REAL "Hotel Rwanda" person), Theogene Rudesingwa (former Ambassador to the US from Rwanda) who has been exiled as well as UN officials, Human Rights activists and refugees themselves.
Much of the film was actually shot by the refugees.
46 min long for a broadcast hour

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Holocaust Survivor's Experiences Conn...
Israel
By upheavalproductions
20 Apr 2011

Dr. Hajo Meyer is a Holocaust survivor and anti-Zionist activist. He has been conducting a speaking tour titled "Never Again For Anyone," sharing his experiences of surviving Auschwitz and his perceptions of Zionism and the Israeli occupation of Palestinian land.

This video is a selection of clips from an interview with Dr. Meyer on February 19, 2011 and discusses his views of the antagonistic relationship between Zionism and Judaism.

Produced by Upheaval Productions.